Vermont’s Creative Economy

first_imgVERMONT ARTS COUNCIL CELEBRATES 40 YEARS OF SUPPORTINGTHE “CREATIVE ECONOMY”Arts Council applauds today’s release of “Advancing Vermont’s CreativeEconomy”by the Vermont Council on Rural DevelopmentMontpelier, Vt. (October 4, 2004) The release today of “AdvancingVermont’s Creative Economy” by the Vermont Council on Rural Development clearly shows that there are social and economic benefits to investing in the arts and culture. According to the report, communities that have thriving cultural centers are more likely to attract business and entrepreneurs than those that do not. The Vermont Arts Council has been working under this premise 1964 and, coincidentally, will begin at year-long celebration of its 40th anniversary this month.”The release of this report couldn’t come at a better time,” said artist, teacher, and Chair of the Arts Council’s board of trustees, Irwin Gelber of Barnet. “Next week, on October 16th at Marlboro College, the Council will kick off the celebration of its 40th Anniversary. It is a great anniversary gift to have this public recognition of what we, who work in the arts, have always known: The arts are central to our quality of life. The arts play a major and often pivotal role in our economy and perhaps most importantly, the arts are a priority in our children’s education.”In addition to providing individual grants and awards to Vermont artists, the Arts Council promotes enduring ways to make the arts a part of all Vermont communities, bringing enjoyment and inspiration to citizens and visitors in all corners of the state. To accomplish this, the Arts Council partners with other public benefit organizations at the local, state and national level, as well as with the private sector in education, human services, and economic development.The Cultural Facilities Grant Program is just one example of how the Arts Council supports a “creative economy.” The Cultural Facilities Grant Program, which is funded by the Legislature and administered by the Vermont Arts Council, provides grants for the improvement of community facilities that provide cultural activities. Recipients of Cultural Facilities Grants include: the Vergennes Opera House, the renovation of which sparked a renewal of the entire downtown area; improvements to the stage lighting at Damon Hall in Hartland; and the addition of accessible restrooms to the Hardwick Town House in the Northeast Kingdom. The “Advancing Vermont’s Creative Economy” report recommends a 400% increase in funding for this grant program from its current $50,000 level to $200,000 annually.”The Cultural Facilities Grant Program is ‘the little engine that could’ of downtown redevelopment and community renaissance,” said Alex Aldrich, Executive Director of the Vermont Arts Council. “Most of the grants we award go toward the improvement of historical buildings in the heart of Vermont’s communities so that a greater variety of cultural activities can be provided to the people of those communities.”Aldrich also sees huge potential in the report’s recommendation #8 that Vermont’s state economists “Track and Report the Impact of the State’s Creative Economy.” “For years, those of us in the arts, humanities, and preservation fields, have seen the impact of our work on community development. Now we have an independent and authoritative voice advocating that this sector deserves public research and investment,” said Aldrich.The Vermont Arts Council was founded in 1964 with a mission to support artists and strengthen the role of the arts in the lives of people and communities. The Council fosters classical, traditional, and emerging forms of artistic expression by functioning as a community partner and a catalyst for artists and organizations. It offers professional development opportunities and technical advice, collects and disseminates arts information, and acts as the state’s foremost arts advocate. For more information about the Vermont Arts Council or its 40th Anniversary Celebration, please call (802) 828-5422 or visit www.vermontartscouncil.org(link is external).Executive SummaryThe creative economy is critical to the future competitiveness of Vermont in the global marketplace. Vermonts heritage, arts and culture are integral strengths. They are an economic sector in Vermont today; they also provide a foundation to the sense of place and creative workforce critical to innovation in other sectors, add value to the Vermont brand, and magnify the attractive power of Vermont as a location to do business. The creative economy is a hidden economic driver, one that deserves understanding, recognition, and investment.The Vermont Council on Culture and Innovation (VCCI) was convened in May 2003 by the Vermont Council on Rural Development. VCCIs charge was to evaluate the role of and challenges to the creative economy in the state and to build a practical and strategic plan for its advancement. This Action Plan is the product of that work. This report makes specific recommendations for how to grow the States creative economy as a vital and complementary part of the states economy as a whole. These recommendations encourage collaboration among Vermonts private sector, cultural organizations, and local, state, and federal government to use Vermonts cultural resources to spark and leverage community and economic development. It documents seventeen recommendations in the four areas listed below that the Governors adminis-tration,Legislature, and public and private partners are encouraged to undertake to expand innovation, enhance community life, attract and encourage entrepreneurs, build Vermonts market identity, and stimulate job growth. Support the Growth of Creative Enterprises by expanding markets, unifying promotion, enhancing the Vermont brand, producing celebratory events, building a Vermont artists and artisans market identity, and providing technical support and access to capital for culturally-based businesses and creative entrepreneurs. Promote and Document the Roles that Creativity, Culture, and Innovation Play in Vermonts Economic Future by tracking and reporting this economic sector, reinforcing arts and heritage education, and instituting a statewide public information campaign.Invest in Communities so They May Build on their Past while Adapting for a Vibrant Future by making culture and heritage priority community investments, supporting historic town and village centers, expanding cultural facilities funding, and encouraging creative entrepreneurial development in vacant industrial space. Develop Vermonts Creative Economy through Community-Based Planning and Improved Statewide Collaboration by facilitating locally designed creative economy projects, building a collaborative umbrella between statewide cultural organizations, and establishing a nonpartisan Governors Commission to provide leadership for the growth of Vermonts creative economy.:Evidence shows that public and private investment in creative enterprises yields favorable economic and social returns,producing jobs and supporting communities.:The development of the creative economy in Vermont is not limited by geography,topography,demographics,or population density.It can play a vital role in every corner of the state.:Just as Vermont was a leader in the manufacturing of things, it is now poised to be a leader in the production of ideas. Like any promising economic sector,the creative economy will need policies and incentives to support its growth.:Strengthening the creative sector will take a long-term and incremental effort.However,pressing needs must be addressed now in order to assure its future competitiveness.:Creative and stimulating communities attract and retain young people.This is a key concern in Vermont,where the loss of its youth to other regions is an historic challenge.:The emerging jobs market places a premium on creative problem solving,yet these skills are not taught consistently throughout Vermont s education system.www.kse50.com/vcci_report.pdf(link is external)last_img read more

Human H5N1 cases confirmed in Egypt, Indonesia

first_imgJun 25, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – The World Health Organization (WHO) today confirmed two H5N1 avian influenza cases, one in a 4-year-old Egyptian boy and the other in a 3-year-old Indonesian girl.The boy is from Qena governorate in southern Egypt. He got sick on Jun 20 and was admitted to the hospital the next day, where he is in stable condition, according to a WHO statement.He is Egypt’s 37th H5N1 case-patient; 15 cases have been fatal. Egypt’s last two confirmed H5N1 cases, both in children, also occurred in Qena governorate.Initial investigation indicates that the boy was exposed to dead poultry, the WHO said. The test results were confirmed by Egypt’s health ministry, the country’s Central Public Health Laboratory, and US Naval Medical Research Unit 3 (NAMRU-3), which is a WHO reference laboratory.The Indonesian girl, from Riau province in central Sumatra, fell ill on Jun 18 and has since recovered, the WHO said. The source of her infection appears to be exposure to sick and dead poultry, the WHO said. Indonesia now has had 101 cases with 80 deaths.Azizman Daad, the avian flu team leader at a hospital in the Riau capital of Pekanbaru, said the girl was treated with oseltamivir (Tamiflu) as soon as she was admitted, Agence-France Presse (AFP) reported on Jun 23. She was to remain in the hospital for a week of observation, the report said.The two new cases boost the WHO’s global H5N1 total to 315 cases, with the number of deaths remaining at 191.See also: Jun 25 WHO statement on Egyptian patientJun 25 WHO statement on Indonesian patientlast_img read more

Pelham in $220m Polish push

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Ivory Coast appeals to CAS over loss of 2021 Cup of Nations

first_imgFILE PHOTOAbidjan, Ivory Coast | AFP | The Ivorian Football Federation (FIF) appealed to the Court of Arbitration for Sport against the decision to strip the country of the 2021 African Cup of Nations on Thursday.The Confederation of African Football took the 2019 tournament from Cameroon due to delays in preparations and offered it the 2021 finals, which had already been awarded to the Ivory Coast.“The FIF was surprised to learn that the president of CAF (Ahmad Ahmad) decided on his own authority, without any prior consultation … to reassign the 2021 edition, which was entrusted until then to the Ivory Coast, to Cameroon,” the FIF said in a statement. “The preparation and work required to organise this great competition, which is particularly important for all Ivorian football and the Ivory Coast, constitutes important economic, financial and human investment.”Ahmad has indicated that the Ivory Coast has now been offered the hosting rights for 2023.Share on: WhatsApplast_img read more

Boca Tennis Champ Naomi Osaka Gives Up U.S. Citizenship to Represent Japan at 2020 Olympics

first_imgBoca Raton resident Naomi Osaka, two-time Grand Slam champion and currently the world’s third-ranked tennis player, is giving up her U.S. citizenship in order to represent Japan in the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.Osaka, who is of Japanese and Haitian descent, was born in Japan before she and her family moved to South Florida in 2006 from New York, where they had lived since 2000.According to Japan’s Nationality Act, individuals who hold dual citizenship are required to choose one nationality before their 22nd birthday. Osaka turns 22 this Wednesday.She says, “It is a special feeling to aim for the Olympics as a representative of Japan. I think it will be more emotional to play for the pride of the country.”Osaka already represents Japan in the Fed Cup and on the WTA Tour. Most recently, she surged past Ashleigh Barty, winning the 2019 China Open.She also became the first Japanese player to win a major after defeated Serena Williams in last year’s U.S. Open final, before earning her second Grand Slam tournament win at the 2019 Australian Open.The Olympic Channel reports that Osaka will only be permitted to represent Japan next year if she plays for that country in at least one more national tennis competition organized by the International Tennis Federation.last_img read more

Penguins fire GM Ray Shero

first_imgIn this April 12, 2012, file photo, Pittsburgh Penguins general manager Ray Shero talks with reporters as the NHL hockey team cleared out their locker room at the Consol Energy Center in Pittsburgh.  AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)PITTSBURGH (AP) – The Pittsburgh Penguins fired general manager Ray Shero on Friday while the status of coach Dan Bylsma will be evaluated.Team co-owners Mario Lemieux and Ron Burkle said it was time to take the franchise in a new direction after the team’s latest playoff flameout. The Penguins lost to the New York Rangers in the Eastern Conference semifinals this week.Assistant general manager Jason Botterill will serve as general manager on an interim basis while the team searches for Shero’s replacement.The Penguins rolled to the Metropolitan Division title this season but failed yet again to produce a bookend to the championship they won with stars Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin in 2009. Pittsburgh is just 4-5 in playoff series since raising the Stanley Cup after blowing a 3-1 series lead against New York.“We share the disappointment of our fans that we have not had success in the playoffs over the past five seasons,” Lemieux and Burkle said in a joint statement. “We believe that new leadership in the general manager’s office will bring a new approach and new energy, and help us return to championship form.”Penguins President and CEO David Morehouse didn’t blame the 51-year-old Shero’s ouster on one specific failure.“This is a decision that’s been in the works for a long time since we’ve won the Cup,” Morehouse said. “We wanted to get back to the Stanley Cup finals and we haven’t and we’re going to make some changes.”The Penguins hired Shero in 2006 and tasked him with building a foundation around Crosby that could turn Pittsburgh into a dynasty. The Penguins reached the finals in 2008 and won it all the following season thanks in part to Shero’s ability to find the right supporting cast to build around Crosby and Malkin’s otherworldly offensive talent.Shero remained aggressive in investing in a “win now” mode as the ensuing disappointments piled up. He wasn’t afraid to go “all in” as he put it last year after trading for Jarome Iginla, Jussi Jokinen, Brenden Morrow and Douglas Murray at the deadline. The moves often created headlines but little else, and splashy moves and a sellout streak seven years and counting proved no longer enough for Shero to keep his job.Morehouse believes Shero’s replacement won’t need to make an overhaul. It’s why the team started what will be a busy offseason by focusing on who will call the shots, not take them.“What we wanted to do first is address the situation at the top and the leader of the organization is the general manager,” Morehouse said. “It’s not a complete rebuild. This is a team that has had a level of success. What we’re trying to do now is get from good to great.”Whether Bylsma will be along for the ride remains unclear.The affable, open-minded Michigan native was a revelation when the Penguins promoted him from their American Hockey League affiliate in the spring of 2009, hoping his optimism would help a loaded team break out of a midseason funk.It worked brilliantly. Four months after taking the job, the former NHL nomad who spent nine seasons as a gritty fourth-line forward was raising the Cup in triumph. Considering Crosby and Malkin were both in their early 20s at the time, more parades were expected.Five years later, the wait continues. While Pittsburgh enjoyed nearly unparalleled success in the regular season – including easily capturing a division title this year despite losing more than 500-man games to injury – the Penguins again struggled to adapt in the postseason.Morehouse said the new general manager will determine whether Bylsma and the rest of the stack gets another shot. The 43-year-old Bylsma has two years remaining on his contract, the product of an extension he received last June as a vote of confidence from Shero following a four-game sweep at the hands of Boston in the Eastern Conference semifinals.The extension came with a promise to adopt a more defensive-minded approach. The Penguins even brought in longtime NHL coach Jacques Martin as an assistant, an old-school yin to Bylsma’s new-school yang.It led to a similar destination: the Penguins watching the final stages of the two-month slog to the Cup go on without them. Now they’ll try to get back to the top with a new architect.“A lot of teams would like to be where we are,” Morehouse said. “However we do have high expectations and we do want to get to them.”last_img read more