Pet neuter plan draws some howls

first_img“If what (the proponents) are saying were true, you’d see dozens of dogs running around in packs without collars,” said Bob Yarnall Jr., president of the American Canine Association. A former animal-control officer, Yarnall contends that most dogs euthanized at shelters are old or sick. “Responsible people should have the right to pursue their hobbies and interests. “It’s their dog.” For guidance in drafting his bill, Levine looked to Santa Cruz County, which in the mid-1990s enacted a mandatory spay and neuter program. Animal intake in shelters dropped by nearly two-thirds, officials said, and the percentage of cats and dogs that have been euthanized also dropped significantly. mza[email protected] (916) 441-4603160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! SACRAMENTO – Get Fido fixed or pay a hefty fine. A state lawmaker wants to force pet owners to spay or neuter nearly all cats and dogs by the time they’re four months old, part of an ambitious plan to reduce the hundreds of thousands of pets he says are euthanized at shelters in California each year. Owners who fail to comply face a $500 fine. The proposal, set to get its first legislative hearing in an Assembly committee today, would exempt only dogs and cats used for breeding by a licensed breeder, as well as guide and police dogs. The bill would “address the needless slaughter” of as many as 500,000 animals in California each year, said Assemblyman Lloyd Levine, D-Van Nuys, the author of the bill, AB 1634. “There has to be a better way.” Few quibble with Levine’s motive, but some critics say the bill would impose a financial hardship on hobbyist breeders, who would have to pay to obtain permits. The fees would be set by local jurisdictions, but permits could cost from $50 to $100 per animal, according to Levine’s office. “Who knows how much it’ll cost,” said Andrea Ansell, a small-scale breeder of Shih Tzus in the Sacramento area. “I think they’re punishing the reputable breeders.” Others accuse proponents of exaggerating the problem, and say the bill would deprive people of the right to breed a dog or cat they’ve grown to love. last_img

first_img“If what (the proponents) are saying were true, you’d see dozens of dogs running around in packs without collars,” said Bob Yarnall Jr., president of the American Canine Association. A former animal-control officer, Yarnall contends that most dogs euthanized at shelters are old or sick. “Responsible people should have the right to pursue their hobbies and interests. “It’s their dog.” For guidance in drafting his bill, Levine looked to Santa Cruz County, which in the mid-1990s enacted a mandatory spay and neuter program. Animal intake in shelters dropped by nearly two-thirds, officials said, and the percentage of cats and dogs that have been euthanized also dropped significantly. [email protected] (916) 441-4603160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! SACRAMENTO – Get Fido fixed or pay a hefty fine. A state lawmaker wants to force pet owners to spay or neuter nearly all cats and dogs by the time they’re four months old, part of an ambitious plan to reduce the hundreds of thousands of pets he says are euthanized at shelters in California each year. Owners who fail to comply face a $500 fine. The proposal, set to get its first legislative hearing in an Assembly committee today, would exempt only dogs and cats used for breeding by a licensed breeder, as well as guide and police dogs. The bill would “address the needless slaughter” of as many as 500,000 animals in California each year, said Assemblyman Lloyd Levine, D-Van Nuys, the author of the bill, AB 1634. “There has to be a better way.” Few quibble with Levine’s motive, but some critics say the bill would impose a financial hardship on hobbyist breeders, who would have to pay to obtain permits. The fees would be set by local jurisdictions, but permits could cost from $50 to $100 per animal, according to Levine’s office. “Who knows how much it’ll cost,” said Andrea Ansell, a small-scale breeder of Shih Tzus in the Sacramento area. “I think they’re punishing the reputable breeders.” Others accuse proponents of exaggerating the problem, and say the bill would deprive people of the right to breed a dog or cat they’ve grown to love. last_img

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