Cranet survey

first_img Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article Dream of HR as strategic business partneris yet to become a reality SeniorHR practitioners have every expectation of becoming strategic businesspartners, but is this long-standing aspiration now becoming a reality? In thelatest in our series of research findings, drawn from the 2003 Cranet survey of UK HR functions,we review the survey’s evidence to answer this question.Businessstrategy creation is made difficult by shortening planning horizons,uncertainty in the planning environment, and the pressures of current eventsthat can prompt ‘firefighting‘rather than  strategic action. But onemeasure of HR’s strategicposition in a company is whether or not it is represented on its main board.The survey shows the number of HR directors on the main board to have fallensince 1999, from 53 per cent to 47 per cent of companies.  HR directors continue to sit a step below themain board. Anotherindicator of strategic level activity by HR is the extent to which there areformal processes for people planning in the organisation. Without a writtenstrategy and an HRM input to the process, it is difficult to see how a claim toa strategic role could be sustained. Between1999 and 2003, the number of organisations with a written business strategystayed the same (81 per cent). However, the number of companies with a writtenHR strategy increased over this period from 57 per cent to 62 per cent.A5 per cent increase in public sector boards with a written HR strategy may bedue to the more formalised approach in the public sector and may be aconsequence of a culture where written policies and strategic intentions helpexplain how public money is spent. Equally, the public sector has gone throughconsiderable change and expansion, putting emphasis on workforce planning,training and development.Thenumber of organisations with a written HR strategy increases according to size,so 78 per cent of companies with over 2,000 employees have a strategy.TheHR role in creating business strategies has, by contrast, diminished. The stageat which HR is involved in the development of business strategy shows a slightdecrease, and there has been a rise  in the number of organisationswhere HR has not been involved in the development of business strategy. HR involvementin this area varies according to organisational size: from 2,000 employeesupwards, 63 per cent of organisations are involved from the outset of strategydevelopment.Thedata on who has responsibility (line management or HR function) for the main HRpolicy areas shows that HR still takes the prime responsibility in most areas.Workforce expansion or contraction is still a line responsibility, confirmingthat HR managers are not necessarily involved at an early stage in talks aboutthe size and structure of the business.Wecan conclude from these results that while HR is undertaking a major strategicrole for many businesses, most commonly, it plays a critical role at theimplementation stage. Cranet surveyOn 5 Oct 2004 in Personnel Todaylast_img

first_img Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article Dream of HR as strategic business partneris yet to become a reality SeniorHR practitioners have every expectation of becoming strategic businesspartners, but is this long-standing aspiration now becoming a reality? In thelatest in our series of research findings, drawn from the 2003 Cranet survey of UK HR functions,we review the survey’s evidence to answer this question.Businessstrategy creation is made difficult by shortening planning horizons,uncertainty in the planning environment, and the pressures of current eventsthat can prompt ‘firefighting‘rather than  strategic action. But onemeasure of HR’s strategicposition in a company is whether or not it is represented on its main board.The survey shows the number of HR directors on the main board to have fallensince 1999, from 53 per cent to 47 per cent of companies.  HR directors continue to sit a step below themain board. Anotherindicator of strategic level activity by HR is the extent to which there areformal processes for people planning in the organisation. Without a writtenstrategy and an HRM input to the process, it is difficult to see how a claim toa strategic role could be sustained. Between1999 and 2003, the number of organisations with a written business strategystayed the same (81 per cent). However, the number of companies with a writtenHR strategy increased over this period from 57 per cent to 62 per cent.A5 per cent increase in public sector boards with a written HR strategy may bedue to the more formalised approach in the public sector and may be aconsequence of a culture where written policies and strategic intentions helpexplain how public money is spent. Equally, the public sector has gone throughconsiderable change and expansion, putting emphasis on workforce planning,training and development.Thenumber of organisations with a written HR strategy increases according to size,so 78 per cent of companies with over 2,000 employees have a strategy.TheHR role in creating business strategies has, by contrast, diminished. The stageat which HR is involved in the development of business strategy shows a slightdecrease, and there has been a rise  in the number of organisationswhere HR has not been involved in the development of business strategy. HR involvementin this area varies according to organisational size: from 2,000 employeesupwards, 63 per cent of organisations are involved from the outset of strategydevelopment.Thedata on who has responsibility (line management or HR function) for the main HRpolicy areas shows that HR still takes the prime responsibility in most areas.Workforce expansion or contraction is still a line responsibility, confirmingthat HR managers are not necessarily involved at an early stage in talks aboutthe size and structure of the business.Wecan conclude from these results that while HR is undertaking a major strategicrole for many businesses, most commonly, it plays a critical role at theimplementation stage. Cranet surveyOn 5 Oct 2004 in Personnel Todaylast_img

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *