Questions loom for Froome

first_img(BBC) – Chris Froome is facing questions after returning an “adverse” drugs test at the Vuelta a Espana.The Team Sky rider had double the allowed level of legal asthma drug Salbutamol in his urine.Cycling’s world governing body the UCI wants more details from the team but says Froome is not suspended.The Briton, 32, says he increased his dosage but it was within the legal limits and the UCI is “absolutely right” to ask questions.Froome says he took his team doctor’s advice to up his inhaler use after his asthma symptoms got worse during the Vuelta.He became the first Briton to win the three-week race around Spain and it followed his Tour de France victory in July.He was notified of the “adverse analytical finding” on September 20 2017.The urine test, taken on September 7, showed levels of the drug, Salbutamol, which is commonly taken for asthma, were at 2 000 nanograms per millilitre (ng/ml).That compares to the World Anti-Doping Agency’s (WADA) threshold of 1 000 ng/ml.The use of Salbutamol is permitted, without the need of a therapeutic use exemption (TUE), but only within certain doses.No other samples taken from Froome during the race needed further examination.The organising body of Vuelta said it will “await the UCI’s official conclusions” before any further action, adding its position is one of “extreme caution, as it hopes for this issue to be resolved as quickly as possible”.The information has only come to light following a Team Sky statement yesterday, issued on the back of recent media reports.The UCI also published details of its investigation yesterday.The UCI says analyses of Froome’s A and B samples show levels which exceed the limit.Team Sky insists the rider inhaled no more than the permissible dose.Froome, who has suffered with asthma since childhood, says he welcomed the investigation.“It is well known that I have asthma and I know exactly what the rules are. I use an inhaler to manage my symptoms (always within the permissible limits) and I know for sure that I will be tested every day I wear the race leader’s jersey.“My asthma got worse at the Vuelta so I followed the team doctor’s advice to increase my Salbutamol dosage. As always, I took the greatest care to ensure that I did not use more than the permissible dose.“I take my leadership position in my sport very seriously. The UCI is absolutely right to examine test results and, together with the team, I will provide whatever information it requires.”last_img

first_img(BBC) – Chris Froome is facing questions after returning an “adverse” drugs test at the Vuelta a Espana.The Team Sky rider had double the allowed level of legal asthma drug Salbutamol in his urine.Cycling’s world governing body the UCI wants more details from the team but says Froome is not suspended.The Briton, 32, says he increased his dosage but it was within the legal limits and the UCI is “absolutely right” to ask questions.Froome says he took his team doctor’s advice to up his inhaler use after his asthma symptoms got worse during the Vuelta.He became the first Briton to win the three-week race around Spain and it followed his Tour de France victory in July.He was notified of the “adverse analytical finding” on September 20 2017.The urine test, taken on September 7, showed levels of the drug, Salbutamol, which is commonly taken for asthma, were at 2 000 nanograms per millilitre (ng/ml).That compares to the World Anti-Doping Agency’s (WADA) threshold of 1 000 ng/ml.The use of Salbutamol is permitted, without the need of a therapeutic use exemption (TUE), but only within certain doses.No other samples taken from Froome during the race needed further examination.The organising body of Vuelta said it will “await the UCI’s official conclusions” before any further action, adding its position is one of “extreme caution, as it hopes for this issue to be resolved as quickly as possible”.The information has only come to light following a Team Sky statement yesterday, issued on the back of recent media reports.The UCI also published details of its investigation yesterday.The UCI says analyses of Froome’s A and B samples show levels which exceed the limit.Team Sky insists the rider inhaled no more than the permissible dose.Froome, who has suffered with asthma since childhood, says he welcomed the investigation.“It is well known that I have asthma and I know exactly what the rules are. I use an inhaler to manage my symptoms (always within the permissible limits) and I know for sure that I will be tested every day I wear the race leader’s jersey.“My asthma got worse at the Vuelta so I followed the team doctor’s advice to increase my Salbutamol dosage. As always, I took the greatest care to ensure that I did not use more than the permissible dose.“I take my leadership position in my sport very seriously. The UCI is absolutely right to examine test results and, together with the team, I will provide whatever information it requires.”last_img

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