Radiothon aids hospital campaign

Norfolk General Hospital is using the radio waves to raise money to help radiologists and patients.The hospital will be holding its Year of the Cat 2.0 Radiothon on both of Norfolk’s radio station on May 7.The money raised from the event will be put towards purchasing a new computed tomography scanner. The CT scanner is the most important piece of technology in the hospital to help with diagnosing a wide variety of conditions by helping to see inside the body painlessly.The CT scanner the hospital is currently using went into service in 2006. With around 8,000 scans every year, the 13-year-old machine is no longer up for the job. By the end of 2019 the manufacturer will no longer support the 2006 version of the machine.The new unit that the hospital plans on purchasing costs $1.5 million. It will produce a sharper, easier to read image, and will work faster to reduce radiation exposure.“We invite listeners to call in during the broadcast with their donation,” Jennifer White, director of the NGH Foundation, said in a press release. “Adding your voice will definitely make a difference in the delivery and maintaining of great healthcare close to home.”The day long broadcast will feature interviews with doctors, nurses, hospital staff, and patients who share their stories. More than $1 million has been raised through previous Radiothon broadcasts.Listeners can tune in to either Norfolk radio station (98.9 and 99.7) on May 7 to listen in and make a pledge. read more

Hold the caviar UNbacked body bans export of most endangered sturgeon

Iran will be able to export up to 44,370 kilogrammes of caviar from the Persian sturgeon under the 2006 quotas announced by the Geneva-based Secretariat of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). The other Caspian Sea countries are Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Russia and Turkmenistan. “The CITES Secretariat has not received the required information from the five Caspian Sea States that would allow it to publish quotas for wild specimens of the other sturgeon species in this shared basin,” it said in a statement on the fish, whose stocks have dwindled to dangerously low levels due to over-fishing and poaching.“The Secretariat will therefore not be publishing any more new quotas for the year 2006. In practice, this means that no imports of wild specimens of these sturgeon stocks should take place in 2006,” it added. In January CITES, alarmed that proposed quota levels might not fully reflect declines in sturgeon stocks caught illegally, warned that it would not approve 2006 export quotas for caviar and other sturgeon products until exporting countries provided more data on the long-term survival of the prized fish. The 169 member countries of CITES, which is administered by the UN Environment Programme (UNEP), have set strict conditions for permitting caviar exports. States that share sturgeon stocks must agree among themselves on catch levels and export quotas based on scientific surveys of the stocks. Information recently provided by the sturgeon-exporting countries bordering the Caspian Sea, the Black Sea/lower Danube River and the Heilongjiang/Amur River on the Sino-Russian border show that many sturgeon species were suffering serious population declines.At the request of the CITES Standing Committee, the European Union (EU) will host a meeting in June devoted to tackling illegal trade in caviar. Law enforcement agencies from around the world will discuss how to improve their capacities to detect illegal trade in and sales of caviar. read more