U.S. Plan to Aid Coal and Nuclear Plants Gets a Bipartisan Thumbs Down From Past Regulators

first_imgU.S. Plan to Aid Coal and Nuclear Plants Gets a Bipartisan Thumbs Down From Past Regulators FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Washington Post;Energy Secretary Rick Perry’s bid to change regulations to help coal and nuclear power plants has run into unusually blunt opposition from a group of former regulators from both parties.Eight former members of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission — including five former chairmen — have filed a letter with the commission opposing Perry’s proposal that would give coal and nuclear plants credit for resilience so that they would have a better chance of beating solar, wind and natural gas competitors.The former commissioners said that Perry was seeking to reverse a quarter century of FERC reforms that have created a marketplace for electric power generators and that many of the coal plants he is aiming to help have no advantage when it comes to reliability.“His focus is clearly coal and there are a lot of dirty coal plants that are not competitive in today’s energy markets,” Elizabeth Moler, a former FERC chairwoman, former deputy energy secretary and former Exelon executive, said in an interview. “To me he’s effectively proposing to subsidize them and put a tax on consumers in doing so. It’s a tax in different clothing. It’s going to cost customers more money to run dirty old coal plants.”In early October, Perry made his proposal to FERC and asked for a decision within 60 days. He proposed that credit be given to power plants with 90-day fuel supplies on site so that they could operate during an emergency including extreme weather or a natural or man-made disaster.FERC is an independent agency, however, and some current members have indicated that the commission would make its own decision. Even one of President Trump’s nominees has stressed FERC’s independence. Robert F. Powelson, who was confirmed in August, said in a speech at the National Press Club on Oct. 16 that “the moment we put our thumbs on the scale is the moment we bastardize the process.”  In an earlier speech on Oct. 4, Powelson said “we will not destroy the marketplace.”Over the past quarter century, FERC has helped create regional electricity grid operators with the ability to accept bids from power plants to supply electricity to the grid. The competition has attracted tens of billions of dollars of investment in natural gas and renewable power sources.The former commissioners’ letter to FERC said Perry’s proposal “would be a significant step backward from the Commission’s long and bipartisan evolution to transparent, open, competitive wholesale markets” and that it “would instead disrupt decades of substantial investment made in the modern electric power system, raise costs for customers, and do so in a  manner directly counter to the Commission’s long experience.”The group wrote that “subsidizing resources so they do not retire would fundamentally distort markets. The subsidized resources would inevitably drive out the unsubsidized resources, and the subsidies would inevitably raise prices to customers.”It said that “investor confidence would evaporate and markets would tend to collapse. This loss of faith in markets would thereby undermine reliability.”Pat Wood III, who was chairman of FERC under President George W. Bush, said that “I understand the politics. I’m sympathetic.”But he said that the reliability Perry said he wanted to favor had more to do with transmission and distribution than it did with they type of fuel used.The group’s letter acknowledged that there are federal tax subsidies for every kind of fuel, but it said that “one step the Commission has never taken is to create or authorize on its own the kind of subsidy proposed here.”Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore), the ranking Democrat on the Senate Finance Committee, said Thursday that FERC should shelve the Perry proposal.“Arbitrarily propping up a dying industry goes against what the GOP has long claimed is its goal – an all-of-the-above energy strategy,” Wyden said in a statement. “This rule clearly picks winners and losers in energy resources, which robs taxpayers of the benefits of competitive markets.”More: Bipartisan group of former FERC commissioners rejects energy secretary’s bid to help coal plantslast_img read more

Announcing Olympia Family Theater’s 12th Mainstage Season

first_imgFacebook4Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Olympia Family TheaterOlympia Family Theater’s 12th Mainstage Season will feature a few familiar titles, 2 south sound originals, and 1 world premiere. Each story will take audiences members on a fantastic journey, across the ocean, across town, and sometimes just across the living room. Our five productions of the season will include Dr. Seuss’ The Cat in the Hat, Winnie the Pooh, 3 Impossible Questions, The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane, and Cinder Edna.Photo courtesy: Olympia Family TheaterDive into the journey with us. There are sure to be a few surprises, new friendships and lots of laughter.Tickets and Subscriptions are on sale now.Dr. Seuss’ The Cat in the HatSeptember 29-October 22, 2017The Cat in The Hat interrupts a rainy afternoon with his unexpected visit to Sally and her brother’s cozy home. Their outspoken and outraged pet Fish is astounded and concerned, but this cat will not be deterred. He will teach us all to make our own fun with nothing but a little imagination. “It’s fun to have fun, but you have to know how.” Along with Thing One and Thing Two, the cat will fill our theater with mischievous humor and madcap style. Young and old alike will delight in this faithful adaptation of a classic book come to life before our very eyes.Winnie the PoohNovember 24-December 23, 2017Join Winnie the Pooh, everyone’s favorite bear “of very little brain” on this frantic adventure. Pooh sets out to rescue Piglet from Kanga’s baths (with soap!) and strengthening medicine. Pooh tries his best but when he eats too much honey and really gets stuck- Owl, Eeyore, Rabbit and his countless relations work together to get him out. Hopefully, Pooh still has time to help his friend.  A.A. Milne’s wit shines throughout this beloved story and makes this a play a journey you will not want to miss.3 Impossible QuestionsFebruary 2-18, 2018A collection of stories centering around the popular character Mullah Nasreddin, who is a well-loved character in the folklore and comic stories of a large number of Islamic cultures. In consultation with the Islamic Center of Olympia, we have collected and adapted the stories of this teacher who sometimes seems a fool and sometimes a hero.  The stories about the mullah (which means teacher) have their origins from as far back as the 13th century where he may or may not have been a real person in Turkey. We celebrate our Muslim friends and neighbors with our retelling of these stories. In many countries and for hundreds of years these tales have been passed down from parents to children and now, we are pleased to share the humor and wisdom of Mullah Nasreddin and this journey with you!The Miraculous Journey of Edward TulaneMarch 16-April 1, 2018With a simple set, live music, and a tender story, Kate DiCamillo’s bestseller comes to life in an unforgettable stage experience. Tossed overboard, stuck in a hobo’s knapsack, and used as a scarecrow, we join a china rabbit doll named Edward as he undertakes a perilous 20-year journey. Along the way, he sheds his arrogance, and his heart grows bigger and softer as he discovers the importance of people, friendship, and love. Based on the book by the bestselling author Kate DiCamillo (Flora & Ulysses, The Tale of Desperaux, Because of Winn-Dixie)!Cinder EdnaMay 11–June 3, 2018Cinder Edna lives next door to a famous girl you have probably heard of, Cinderella. Ella and Edna have cruel stepmothers and stepsisters, but they have different approaches to life’s journey. Cinder Edna has better things to do than sit in the ashes and feel sorry for herself and she doesn’t believe in Fairy Godmothers. She saves her money to put a dress on layaway, just in case a special occasion should arise. She takes the bus to the ball AND she wears comfortable shoes. Although each ‘Cinder’ ends up with the prince of her dreams, one may be a great deal happier than the other. You decide.PERFORMANCESThursday & Friday performances are at 7:00 p.m.Saturday & Sunday performances are matinees at 2:00 p.m.Pay-What-You-Can Performances: Each show has one performance where patrons can pay what they can for a ticket. For these dates no online sales, cash or check at box office starting at noon day of show. The lobby opens 1 hour before the performance time.TICKETSAdvance ticket purchase is recommended due to limited seating! Tickets can be purchased online or by phone with Visa, MasterCard or American Express. Tickets are available 24 hours from the Olympia Family Theater website. Box office hours: 2 hours before each performance (cash, check or credit card)SINGLE TICKETSAdults: $19.00Senior/Student/Military: $16.00Youth (Under 12): $13.00GROUP DISCOUNTS10% off groups of 10 or more to one performance.SUBSCRIBE and SAVESave up to 30% off your seats with a Season SubscriptionSave up to 25% off your seats with a 3-Show SubscriptionAll subscribers get 10% off any additional single tickets they purchaseACCESSIBILITYAll performances are wheelchair accessible. Please mention any special needs when making your reservation.Based in downtown Olympia, OFT is a nonprofit community theater that engages audiences of all ages in performances and programs that entertain and educate.Olympia Family Theater612 4th Ave EOlympia, WA 98501360-570-1638last_img read more