Student government hosts South Bend Scavenger Hunt

first_imgFor students who are looking for a study break or a change of pace, Notre Dame’s student government is hosting a scavenger hunt of the South Bend area. Students who visit the five sites on the Fall 2019 scavenger hunt list — and submit photo evidence — will be entered into a raffle for a prize.Junior Jessica Reeg and sophomore Erica Maggelet organized the scavenger hunt to promote the South Bend Adventure Guide, which the department of student engagement and outreach launched in August. The guide provides a list of sites and events students can explore in the South Bend area. The department hopes the scavenger hunt will help publicize the guide, as students share their experiences on social media.“As the department of community engagement and outreach, one of the biggest things we wanted to do is try to get more and more kids involved in the South Bend community — not just as a place to volunteer — but actually be a part of the community and go out, eat at local restaurants and shop and visit parks,” the department’s director, Alex Yom, said.Yom said he hopes the South Bend Adventure Guide can help bridge the divide between the Notre Dame and South Bend communities, encouraging students to step off campus and experience the city’s culture.“We saw there’s kind of a gap in between the availability of things to do in South Bend and not many people knowing about how to get there or what to do,” Yom said. “So we wanted to kind of fill that gap by developing a guide where people could turn to see, ‘If I’m looking to go off campus, this is somewhere I could go.’”Yom said the South Bend Adventure Guide offers “all kinds of different activities for students to do if they’re looking for a break from the everyday routine on campus.” He noted that students can now visit South Bend’s Howard Park, which had its grand reopening on Nov. 29. As a fun way to explore the city, Reeg encouraged students to check out “First Fridays” in downtown South Bend. Every first Friday of the month, she said, downtown South Bend has a themed showcase of events, restaurant deals and a different monthly theme. Although this semester’s scavenger hunt ends on Dec. 13, Reeg said the department is planning a spring scavenger hunt for next semester. She said she hopes students will take the opportunity to explore the community.“A lot of other schools have big college towns, especially state schools,” Reeg said. “And I think that there’s a tendency for Notre Dame students to stay within their little safe bubble, not really leave campus much because, in theory, you could really stay here — we have restaurants, we have things to do. And a lot of dorm culture stays on campus so [students] don’t even really go out socially too.”Sophomore Emma Kerr said she thinks many students have stigmas and preconceived notions about the city of South Bend.“I wasn’t sure about the South Bend area coming to Notre Dame, especially as a lot of my friends were going to big and bustling cities,” Kerr said. She said she would be interested in the scavenger hunt and hopes other students will take the time to engage with the South Bend community in meaningful ways.“There’s a lot going on in the city,” Kerr said. “And I think that sometimes kids just don’t take that initial step into the community.”Yom said the department of community engagement and outreach wants to foster a culture of engagement between students and the South Bend area. Currently, he said the department is developing a partnership with the Moreau First-Year Experience program, and they plan to put the South Bend Adventure Guide on next year’s Welcome Weekend app. “We’re trying to build a culture of getting off campus and enjoying the South Bend community from your first year on,” Yom said.Before the semester comes to an end, Reeg encouraged all students to visit the scavenger hunt locations and DM their photos to @sbadventure_guide on Instagram. ”[If you win the raffle], you get a gift card to Rocco’s Pizza — which is also another place on the guide,” Reeg said.Tags: Department of Community Engagement, Downtown South Bend, South Bend Adventure Guidelast_img read more

IPE Awards Seminar: Too much self-interest in banking dangerous

first_imgToo much self-interest in banking makes the sector dangerously fragile, exposes the public to unnecessary risks and distorts the economy, according to Anat Admati, George GC Parker professor of finance and economics at the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University in the US.Addressing the IPE Awards Seminar in Noordwijk, the Netherlands, yesterday, she said: “There are things to do about [the failing banking system], but they may not get done, unfortunately. There is a lot of politics and a lot of confusion and a lot of self-interest in this.”That is a governance problem, and it goes all the way to the politicians. Key to the observation is that banking is not a system, right now especially, where markets work. It requires firm and effective regulation, sensible regulation.”The root cause of the problem is that banks hold a lot of leverage, unborrowed funding, with the loss-absorbing equity ratio on their balance sheets being too small. “The credit crunch did happen not because they had too much equity but because they had too much debt,” she said. “Banks make bad lending decisions – too little or too much, boom and bust or too much and too little at the same time.”She added that, “even now, the continued weakness and distorted incentives of banks dampen new lending that would help economic recovery”.Instead of the small amounts of equity banks currently hold – around 5% – Admati suggested they ought to hold an equity ratio of 20-30%.Holding more equity is not expensive she said.In addition, some of the risks taken in the current banking sector, such as excessive leverage risks, benefit only the very select few – while many will suffer.And while regulators have authority, she accused them of lacking the political will to change things.Admati believes some banks may no longer be viable.In the preface for her book ‘The Bankers’ New Clothes’, published earlier this year, she writes: “A cleanup of such banks and of the financial system is important even if it means eliminating or shrinking some banks.”Hiding from reality and providing public support to banks that cannot otherwise survive or which are too big and too complex to control, as governments all over the world are doing, is dangerous and expensive.”last_img read more

Chch residents expect sex workers to return

first_imgRadio NZ News 27 November 2017Family First Comment: “Residents were already gathering pictures of condoms and needles in their gardens, video of sex workers shouting as well as pictures of business transactions taking place in front of their homes.”Poor families – having to put up with a flawed law and pathetic support from police and council.Some Christchurch residents are dreading the summer as they expect street based sex workers to return to their neighbourhood.Residents in St Albans, a suburb just north of the central city, said, for the last six years, they had been abused, they had seen sex workers engaged sex acts in their backyards and they frequently saw condoms and needles littered across the driveways.Christchurch City Council had been grappling with how to deal with it, although last month it threw out a potential bylaw which would limit where sex workers could work, proposed by the residents and their lawyers.The council believed enforcement would not be practical – instead they opted for a community-led working group, backed by the police and the New Zealand Prostitutes’ Collective.But one resident, Matt Bonis, said he was sceptical it would change anything in the long run.The next stepChristchurch City Council voted for a community working group last month, partly due to the impracticalities it saw with the legal-framework and enforcement of a bylaw.But none of the sex workers RNZ spoke with said they had been spoken to by council staff, before it decided a community-based working group was the right approach.RNZ put this to the council, who confirmed no staff had been deployed to Manchester Street to consult with the sex workers directly prior to the council vote.The council’s head of strategic policy, Helen Beaumont, said there was no need to, as the focus was on the legal viability of a bylaw.“No, we didn’t speak to the sex workers, we used the Prostitutes’ Collective as their sort of union,” she said. “They have a very good understanding of the situation for the sex workers on the street, so they were able to provide that perspective to us.”Ms Beaumont said representatives from the working group would be sent out to Manchester Street in the coming weeks.READ MORE: http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/national/344834/chch-residents-expect-sex-workers-to-returnlast_img read more

Sen. Coats Supports Bill to Curb EPA Regulation

first_imgCoats supported legislation to block an EPA regulation Wednesday.WASHINGTON, D.C. – Senator Dan Coats (R-Ind.) today supported legislation to block an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulation that would set the ground-level ozone standard to an unprecedented low level.“The EPA’s unceasing campaign to implement job-killing regulations has reached a new low, literally,” said Coats.“This proposed regulation would tighten required air quality compliance standards across the board while disregarding economic impact and the significant environmental investments already made by Hoosier businesses. I will not stand idly by while the Obama Administration issues job-killing regulations that will strangle Indiana’s economy.”Coats is an original cosponsor of the Clean Air, Strong Economies (CASE) Act, which would require the EPA to focus on the worst areas for air quality before lowering the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ground-level ozone across the country. Introduced by Senator John Thune (R-N.D.), the legislation is cosponsored by Coats and eight other senators.last_img read more

Kawhi files lawsuit against Nike over ‘Klaw’ logo

first_imgToronto Raptors star Kawhi Leonard has filed a lawsuit against Nike in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of California in an attempt to reclaim control over a logo Leonard says he created.“In 2011, just after being drafted to the National Basketball Association, Kawhi Leonard authored a unique logo that included elements that were meaningful and unique to him,” the lawsuit reads. “Leonard traced his notably large hand, and, inside the hand, drew stylized versions of his initials ‘KL’ and the number that he had worn for much of his career, ‘2.’ The drawing Leonard authored was an extension and continuation of drawings he had been creating since early in his college career.“Several years later, as part of an endorsement deal with Nike, Leonard allowed Nike to use on certain merchandise the logo he created while Leonard continued to use the logo on non-Nike goods. Unbeknownst to Leonard and without his consent, Nike filed an application for copyright registration of his logo and falsely represented in the application that Nike had authored the logo.”Leonard addressed the lawsuit briefly while talking with reporters Tuesday ahead of Game 3 of the NBA Finals against the Golden State Warriors.“It happened over a long time ago. You guys are just finding out. Not a big worry of mine,” Leonard said.A Nike spokesperson declined to comment.The lawsuit goes on to say that Leonard intends to use the “Klaw” logo in various capacities — including clothing lines, footwear and in connection with sports camps and charity functions — but that Nike has objected to his doing so. Leonard, therefore, wants to regain control of the logo, which he created while he was part of Jordan Brand’s stable of athletes.Since then, though, Leonard became a shoe free agent — before eventually signing a deal with New Balance earlier this season. The Boston-based company has created multiple campaigns involving Leonard this season — one being “Fun Guy,” and another, more recently, being “King of the North,” playing off a phrase from the recently concluded HBO series “Game of Thrones.”The nine-page lawsuit would, in theory, allow for a new campaign with New Balance sometime in the future — or at the very least would again give Leonard (should he win) control of a logo he says should be his.The lawsuit goes on to explain, in detail, how Leonard came up with the idea for the logo, which was developed at the start of his rookie season during his lockout-shortened 2011-12 campaign with the San Antonio Spurs.“Leonard is known for his extremely large hands,” the lawsuit reads. “Throughout his career, spectators have noticed Leonard’s large hands and they are often described as contributing to his success as a player.“Since at least his college years, Leonard contemplated and conceived of ideas for a personal logo which would be unique to him and reflect something meaningful relating to his own image. In late December 2011 or January 2012, Leonard refined a logo he had been creating for several years that encompassed his large and powerful hands, his initials and his jersey number.“Leonard shared his original work of authorship with family and friends, solicited the advice and expertise of a creative designer, received comments and suggestions, and made modifications to his design.”Later in the lawsuit, it states Leonard and Nike have gone back-and-forth multiple times over the past several months regarding the use of the logo, with the last correspondence being in March, when Nike told him, “it owns all intellectual property rights in the Leonard Logo and demanding that Leonard immediately cease and desist from what Nike claimed was the unauthorized use of the Leonard Logo.” Source: ESPN Finally, the lawsuit says the goal of the plaintiff is for Leonard to be declared the sole author of the logo; that Leonard’s use of his logo doesn’t interfere with Nike’s rights, including “without limitation any rights Nike may claim to possess with respect to the Leonard Logo”; and that the defendant committed fraud on the Copyright Office in registering the Leonard Logo, along with “any such other and further relief as this Court deems just and proper.”Leonard and the Raptors will face the Warriors for Game 3 of the Finals at Oakland’s Oracle Arena on Wednesday night. The series is tied at a game apiece.last_img read more