U.S. Plan to Aid Coal and Nuclear Plants Gets a Bipartisan Thumbs Down From Past Regulators

first_imgU.S. Plan to Aid Coal and Nuclear Plants Gets a Bipartisan Thumbs Down From Past Regulators FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Washington Post;Energy Secretary Rick Perry’s bid to change regulations to help coal and nuclear power plants has run into unusually blunt opposition from a group of former regulators from both parties.Eight former members of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission — including five former chairmen — have filed a letter with the commission opposing Perry’s proposal that would give coal and nuclear plants credit for resilience so that they would have a better chance of beating solar, wind and natural gas competitors.The former commissioners said that Perry was seeking to reverse a quarter century of FERC reforms that have created a marketplace for electric power generators and that many of the coal plants he is aiming to help have no advantage when it comes to reliability.“His focus is clearly coal and there are a lot of dirty coal plants that are not competitive in today’s energy markets,” Elizabeth Moler, a former FERC chairwoman, former deputy energy secretary and former Exelon executive, said in an interview. “To me he’s effectively proposing to subsidize them and put a tax on consumers in doing so. It’s a tax in different clothing. It’s going to cost customers more money to run dirty old coal plants.”In early October, Perry made his proposal to FERC and asked for a decision within 60 days. He proposed that credit be given to power plants with 90-day fuel supplies on site so that they could operate during an emergency including extreme weather or a natural or man-made disaster.FERC is an independent agency, however, and some current members have indicated that the commission would make its own decision. Even one of President Trump’s nominees has stressed FERC’s independence. Robert F. Powelson, who was confirmed in August, said in a speech at the National Press Club on Oct. 16 that “the moment we put our thumbs on the scale is the moment we bastardize the process.”  In an earlier speech on Oct. 4, Powelson said “we will not destroy the marketplace.”Over the past quarter century, FERC has helped create regional electricity grid operators with the ability to accept bids from power plants to supply electricity to the grid. The competition has attracted tens of billions of dollars of investment in natural gas and renewable power sources.The former commissioners’ letter to FERC said Perry’s proposal “would be a significant step backward from the Commission’s long and bipartisan evolution to transparent, open, competitive wholesale markets” and that it “would instead disrupt decades of substantial investment made in the modern electric power system, raise costs for customers, and do so in a  manner directly counter to the Commission’s long experience.”The group wrote that “subsidizing resources so they do not retire would fundamentally distort markets. The subsidized resources would inevitably drive out the unsubsidized resources, and the subsidies would inevitably raise prices to customers.”It said that “investor confidence would evaporate and markets would tend to collapse. This loss of faith in markets would thereby undermine reliability.”Pat Wood III, who was chairman of FERC under President George W. Bush, said that “I understand the politics. I’m sympathetic.”But he said that the reliability Perry said he wanted to favor had more to do with transmission and distribution than it did with they type of fuel used.The group’s letter acknowledged that there are federal tax subsidies for every kind of fuel, but it said that “one step the Commission has never taken is to create or authorize on its own the kind of subsidy proposed here.”Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore), the ranking Democrat on the Senate Finance Committee, said Thursday that FERC should shelve the Perry proposal.“Arbitrarily propping up a dying industry goes against what the GOP has long claimed is its goal – an all-of-the-above energy strategy,” Wyden said in a statement. “This rule clearly picks winners and losers in energy resources, which robs taxpayers of the benefits of competitive markets.”More: Bipartisan group of former FERC commissioners rejects energy secretary’s bid to help coal plantslast_img read more

Boathouse in private location could be the ultimate holiday hotspot

first_imgLot 602 Point Break Circuit, Kingscliff NSW.In early 2017, he received development approval from Tweed Shire Council for boathouse andresidential use.“Since then, we have stayed overnight at the property and there is really nothing like waking up to the views across the river and listening to the bird life in the adjoining nature reserve,” he said.“I am now taking the property to market as my children have grown and we don’t use the space as often.”The property is 20 minutes south of the Gold Coast airport, and a five-minute walk to Salt Beach and local cafes. Expressions of interest for The Salt Boathouse close on July 24 at 5pm. Lot 602 Point Break Circuit, Kingscliff NSW.Brisbane developer Don O’Rorke is selling his one-of-a-kind creekfront boathouse at Salt Village in south Kingscliff.Mr O’Rorke, the executive chairman of Consolidated Properties, bought the Salt Boathouse in 2011, due to the property’s location on the creekfront, only a short walk from patrolled beaches, restaurants and a shopping precinct in Salt Village.The property, marketed by Tony Holland of McGrath Real Estate, is being sold with offers between $900,000 to $1.25 million. Lot 602 Point Break Circuit, Kingscliff NSW.The property, has a boat ramp and 19m of direct frontage to Cudgen Creek, is set on 814sq m of land adjoining a nature reserve, and is the only boathouse of its kind on the Tweed Coast.The 150sq m interior of the property features racking and storage for watercraft along with a kitchenette, dining area and bathroom facilities, and has Council approval as a combined boathouse and residence.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home3 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor3 hours agoMr O’Rorke said the property represented a rare opportunity to secure a freehold creek-front property in a masterplanned community, designed by award-winning architect Brian Toyota, who was responsible for the creation of the Mantra and Peppers Salt Village Resorts.“In recent years this property has provided a fantastic place for me to spend quality time with my children,” he said.“The property has also been used as a commercial boathouse from time to time, housing businesses Tweed Coast Adventures and Watersports Guru.”last_img read more

Tiger says he would’ve been healthy for Masters this week

first_imgTiger Woods says he has recovered “night and day” from a sore back that hindered his preparations for the now-postponed Masters and misses the Augusta National showdown while quarantined. In an interview released Thursday by Woods sponsor GolfTV, the 15-time major champion said he is cycling more and playing tennis at times to stay fit and his back pain has eased. Tiger Woods says he would have been ready to defend his title at the Masters this week despite back pain that hampered his preparations for the now-postponed event at Augusta National “Night and day. I feel a lot better than I did then. I’ve been able to turn a negative into a positive,” Woods said. “I’ve been able to train a lot. I’ve been able to get my body back to where I think it should be at.” Woods, who says he would have been ready for the Masters this week, skipped last month’s Players Championship with back pain only to watch it be called off after 18 holes due to the coronavirus pandemic. “It’s hard to unwire those circuits now. I feel a little edgy. I want to get out there. I want to compete,” Woods said. “I felt really alive and wired and kind of irritable. I didn’t know what was going on. I realized it was Sunday and I was supposed to be flying up. “Subconsciously, I had already known I was supposed to be getting ready to go to be playing at the Masters this week. My body was ready to go.” Woods is also able to golf near his home at a course open despite the coronavirus pandemic that has pushed back the Masters to November and kept him and his family isolated at home. “I’ve been able to play some golf,” Woods said. “Medalist is still open here. Every course virtually to the south of us is closed but it remains open so it has been nice to go out there and play and hit golf balls a little bit… just get some activity and some peace of mind.” Players can’t touch rakes or flagsticks and carts are only for drivers, but the strange thing for the reigning Masters champion is practicing with no event in mind. “It’s weird practicing with no end goal to get ready for,” Woods said. “Hypothetically it could be this. Hypothectically it could be that. It seems like it changes from day to day. Week to week there’s always something new.” Read Also: Murray, Kerber to play in virtual Madrid Open“But I did take the jacket off. This jacket cannot get cupcake on it.”Woods said dealing with back pain, which led to spinal fusion surgery that enabled him to resume his career, has helped him cope with the enforced waiting he now faces.“To keep all our hopes up every day, sometimes it’s challenging,” Woods said. “I don’t know how long it’s going to work but so far these little mini goals have worked for us.”FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… Promoted Content10 Risky Jobs Some Women DoTop 7 Best Car Manufacturers Of All Time5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable WayGorgeous Asian Actresses All Men Are Crazy AboutDiscover How Women From Famous Paintings Looked Like In Real Life6 Interesting Ways To Make Money With A Drone9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A TattooBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever MadeBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For ThemTop 10 Most Romantic Nations In The WorldTop 10 TV Friends Who Used To Be Enemies – ‘Go from meal to meal’ – Woods, a five-time Masters winner, stages putting contests with son Charlie to decide in whose closet the green jacket will reside. That’s as close as any rival will get to taking it until November. “I guess I’ll be defending then. Hopefully that all comes about,” Woods said. “This is not the way I wanted to keep the jacket for a longer period of time. I wanted to get out there and earn it again like I did in ’02.” Woods has yet to sit down and sort out what his schedule plan might be when play resumes, knowing the virus impact could delay or cancel more events. “The way the schedule looks we’re going to be awfully busy in the fall,” Woods said. “Trying to figure all that out. “I’m going to sit down with my team and figure out what is the best practice schedule, what are the tournaments I should play in to get ready, when should I rest, all of the things that are kind of up in the air. “What I keep telling everyone around here is let’s just go from meal to meal and it will add up.” – Masters menu food fight – On Tuesday, Woods and his family dined on fajitas, sushi and sashimi with milkshakes for desert, the same menu he would have served that night at the Masters Champions Dinner. This one also included cupcakes and a most un-Masters-like closing food fight. “It got a little interesting at the end,” Woods said. “It got a little ugly where icing was flowing across people’s hair and face so we had a little bit of fun at the end.last_img read more