Vermont one of few states to see increase in bad mortgages

first_imgWhile Vermont still has the second fewest bad mortgages (delinquent plus foreclosed) east of the Mississippi, Vermont was one of only a handful of states that saw an increase in bad mortgages between October 2010 and October 2011, this is in contrast to the Unites States as a whole, which has seen a drop in non-current housing loans of 7.5 percent over the last year. Meanwhile, Vermont’s number has increased 5.7 percent. Vermont is one of only seven states to see an increase in bad mortgages.The October Mortgage Monitor report released by Lender Processing Services, Inc. (NYSE: LPS) shows mortgage delinquencies nationwide (see chart below) continue their decline, now nearly 30 percent off their January 2010 peak. Meanwhile, foreclosure inventories are on the rise, reaching an all-time high at the end of October of 4.29 percent of all active mortgages. The average days delinquent for loans in foreclosure extended as well, setting a new record of 631 days since last payment, while the average days delinquent for loans 90 or more days past due but not yet in foreclosure decreased for the second consecutive month.Judicial vs. non-judicial foreclosure processes remain a significant factor in the reduction of foreclosure pipelines from state to state, with non-judicial foreclosure inventory percentages less than half that of judicial states. This is largely a result of the fact that foreclosure sale rates in non-judicial states have been proceeding at four to five times that of judicial. Non-judicial foreclosure states made up the entirety of the top 10 states with the largest year-over-year decline in non-current loans percentages.The October data also showed that mortgage originations are on the rise, reaching levels not seen since mid-2010. Mortgage prepayment rates have also spiked, as much of the new origination is related to borrower refinancing; loans originated in 2009 and later are the primary drivers of the increase. While FHA origination activity is down, GSE and FHA originations still account for the vast majority of all new loans – nearly nine out of every 10 new mortgages.As reported in LPS’ First Look release, other key results from LPS’ latest Mortgage Monitor report include:Total U.S. loan delinquency rate: 7.93%Month-over-month change in delinquency rate: -2.0%Total U.S. foreclosure pre-sale inventory rate: 4.29%Month-over-month change in foreclosure pre-sale inventory rate: 2.5% States with highest percentage of non-current* loans: FL, MS, NV, NJ, ILStates with the lowest percentage of non-current* loans: ND, AK, SD, WY, MT*Non-current totals combine foreclosures and delinquencies as a percent of active loans in that state.Notes:(1) Totals are extrapolated based on LPS Applied Analytics’ loan-level database of mortgage assets.(2) All whole numbers are rounded to the nearest thousand. About the Mortgage MonitorLPS manages the nation’s leading repository of loan-level residential mortgage data and performance information on nearly 40 million loans across the spectrum of credit products. The company’s research experts carefully analyze this data to produce a summary supplemented by dozens of charts and graphs that reflect trend and point-in-time observations for LPS’ monthly Mortgage Monitor Report. To review the full report, visit http://www.lpsvcs.com/NEWSROOM/INDUSTRYDATA/Pages/default.aspx(link is external).About Lender Processing Services Lender Processing Services, Inc. (LPS) is a leading provider of integrated technology, services and mortgage performance data and analytics to the mortgage and real estate industries. LPS offers solutions that span the mortgage continuum, including lead generation, origination, servicing, workflow automation (Desktop®), portfolio retention and default, augmented by the company’s award-winning customer support and professional services. Approximately 50 percent of all U.S. mortgages by dollar volume are serviced using LPS’ loan servicing platform, MSP. LPS also offers proprietary mortgage and real estate data and analytics for the mortgage and capital markets industries. For more information about LPS, visit www.lpsvcs.com(link is external). JACKSONVILLE, Fla. – December 1, 2011last_img read more

US Elba Island LNG export project pushed back again

first_imgElba Island LNG (Image courtesy of Kinder Morgan)US energy company Kinder Morgan said on Wednesday that the start-up of its Elba Island liquefied natural gas (LNG) export project near Savannah, Georgia had been pushed back, again.“Our Elba liquefaction project, we now anticipate that it will be in service in the first quarter of 2019,” Kim Dang, President of Kinder Morgan said during a conference call discussing the company’s third-quarter results.Dang added that Kinder Morgan does not expect the new delay to have a “material impact on our construction costs, given the way our construction and commercial contracts are structured.” He did not discuss the reasons behind the newest delay.To remind, Kinder Morgan said earlier this year that the in-service date for the liquefaction facility located near the existing import facility at Elba Island was pushed back to the fourth quarter of this year. The original start-up of the facility was expected in the third quarter of this year.Kinder Morgan said previously that delays in getting the liquefaction units assembled and then delivered to the site as well as some construction delays had contributed to pushing back the in-service date.The nearly $2 billion Elba liquefaction project’s EPC contractor is IHI E&C while the project is supported by a 20-year contract with the Hague-based LNG giant Shell.The project is currently building a total of ten liquefaction units with a total capacity of 2.5 million tonnes per year of LNG.The first of the ten units is expected to be placed in service in the first quarter next year, with the remaining nine units scheduled to come online throughout 2019, according to Kinder Morgan. LNG World News Stafflast_img read more