Knights of Columbus fundraise with steak sandwich sales

first_imgThe white and blue banner that hangs from the double arches of the Knights of Columbus building at the intersection of South and God quads reads, “Home of Football Game Day Steak Sales $1,000,000 Since 1973.” Talk to any member of the Notre Dame Knights of Columbus, though, and they will tell you it’s about much more than the steak.Photo courtesy of Notre Dame Knights of Columbus “Notre Dame Knights are proud of their steak sale program, but more than the time spent on game days raising funds, the council enjoys working with some of the charities we support,” Robert Rauch, Notre Dame class of 2012 and former president of the Notre Dame Knights of Columbus, said.“For instance, we annually conduct several events with the Corvilla Home, one of our first charities,” Rauch, who now works as the College Council Coordinator for the Knights of Columbus Supreme Office, said. “We have annually prepared and consumed a Thanksgiving dinner with residents, we have participated in bingo and bowling events, and we have sponsored a team in their Snowball Softball tournament. The best part of steak sales is being able to have a relationship with the people we support.”According to the Notre Dame Knight of Columbus website, the steak sale began in 1973, but members of the Knights had been grilling steak sandwiches as part of their own tailgate since the late 1950s. Dennis Malloy, a third-year law student, said the location of the sale helped it take hold as a game day tradition.“The location of the Council Home next to the old bookstore was a prime location with thousands of potential consumers,” Malloy said. “We decided to sell only steak sandwiches to provide a distinct treat to our customers and reap the benefits of economies of scale.“Even though the bookstore moved and the glamour of Irish Green is far away, we are an essential part of the game day experience for many who make a special trip to the corner of God Quad and South Quad to visit us.”Malloy, who is a former grand knight of Notre Dame’s branch of the Knights of Columbus, Council 1477, said the Notre Dame Knights have about 100 active members. Each football Saturday, Malloy said at least 15 people work the steak sale at any given time, and about 40 people, including Knights, their friends and family and members of other campus organizations, work the sale throughout the day.Rauch said poor weather can lessen proceeds from the steak sale, but on a typical game day, the Knights will serve about 3,000 sandwiches and raise $10,000. As the sign outside the Knights of Columbus building highlights, the steak sales have raised over $1 million since 1973, a figure which Rauch said is not adjusted for inflation.Sophomore Henry Dickman, who oversees the steak sale this year, said he hopes to involve more student groups in the unique fundraiser.“Steak sales are not only significant in terms of the funds raised, but the event also provides a great way for council members to get to know each other and serve the Notre Dame community,” Dickman said. “Going forward, we’d like to find ways to get other campus groups involved with helping at the sales as well as attracting more students to buy sandwiches.”Rauch said the tradition of the Knights of Columbus at Notre Dame extends much further than the steak sales. The Notre Dame Knights were founded in 1910 and were the first student group on campus aside from athletic teams, the marching band and student government.“Like many things related to Notre Dame football, Knights of Columbus steak sales are rooted in tradition,” Rauch said. “The large stream of fans to the bookstore would smell the steak next door and would buy one on their way in or out. Plus, the steak sale program is all about charity and giving back — both themes that members of the Notre Dame family identify with.“When Fr. Sorin said that Notre Dame would one day be an enormous force for good in this country, he was speaking of people like the Notre Dame Knights who through their steak sale program and all their other activities serves as this force by being a charity that evangelizes.”Rauch said the sale can be taxing at times, but the benefits far outweigh the challenges.“College students typically don’t enjoy waking up before 8 a.m. on a Saturday morning, much less multiple Saturdays in a row, but that’s what the men of this council do every game day,” he said. “But when you have a good cause to support, you keep that in site and you keep going.”Jeff Gerlomes, Notre Dame class of 2014 and former president of the Notre Dame Knights of Columbus, said while the steak sale serves as a favorite game day tradition, it also goes beyond the bounds of Notre Dame football to make a tangible impact on peoples’ lives.“When we see that line down the quad, it’s humbling to think that this sandwich is as important to some of these people as a tartan cape or a golden helmet,” Gerlomes said. “Even more important, though, is that this fundraiser is our biggest opportunity to make a direct impact on some of the most serious social injustices around us. Instead of just campaigning for the poor and marginalized, we can aid programs that really help them on a lasting and personal level.”Tags: Game Day Tradition, Knights of Columbus, Steak Sandwich Salelast_img read more

EPA administrator speaks at ND

first_imgMargaret Hynds | The Observer Just days after Pope Francis’s arrival in the U.S. and address to the nation’s leaders, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administrator Gina McCarthy spoke on campus Friday afternoon to both students and the press, discussing climate change and Notre Dame’s recently announced efforts to reduce its carbon footprint and integrate a variety of sustainable energy sources.In the next five years, the University will cease burning coal in its campus power plant, and by 2030 it plans to halve its carbon emissions, University president Fr. John Jenkins said last week.At Friday’s press conference, McCarthy quoted Francis’s words earlier in the week and stressed the importance of the nation getting behind efforts to prevent further climate change.“On Wednesday, during remarks at the White House, the Holy Father Pope Francis said, ‘When it comes to the care of our common home, we are living at a critical moment in history,’” she said. “Indeed the Pope, President Obama and countless other world leaders have made it clear that the time to action climate change is now, and that all of us — whether in the public, private, academic or faith-based communities — have a role to play in addressing this global challenge for the sake of our kids and especially for those most vulnerable. That’s why we must act today.“And I have to say, the pope’s time in Washington was indeed personal for me, not just as a Catholic but as someone who has been in the fight against climate change for many years.“His trip reaffirmed the tide really has turned … that we’re past the old days of debating the science and making incremental progress, and right now we do have solutions available to us so that we can take actions now that are not just good at addressing climate but that are also good for our economy and those most vulnerable,” she said.McCarthy described Notre Dame’s plans for the integration of sustainable energy and reduction of carbon emissions as “an opportunity to demonstrate what the pope’s moral responsibility actually looks like.”“The steps we are taking here today at ND are something that I want to make sure everybody knows and is celebrating, because they are a tremendous example of bringing life to the pope’s challenge; of recognizing that we have a moral responsibility and we do have actions that we can and must take today,” she said. “I want to explain to everybody just how excited I am to be on this campus, under this president’s leadership and actually tackling this issue in a way that’s going to add value to the campus, but perhaps more importantly bring life to the intersect of faith and values that the challenge of climate change demands.“That is really so well aligned with the message of this pope. And I commend the University of ND for setting ambitious goals and efforts in taking action already to reduce their carbon footprint, which they expect to halve by 2030. That is what leadership and that is what stewardship actually looks like,” she said.Executive Vice President John Affleck-Graves also spoke, detailing further what the University hopes and plans to do in the coming years in regards to renewable energy.As the University works through its coal cessation plan, he said, it has explored and is currently working on a number of other energy strategies.“At the moment, we’re using a lot of natural gas, we’re looking at creating our first geothermal field set to go in after next June as we complete the research building on the east side of campus,” he said. “We’re going to have a geothermal field under the parking area there, and we’re looking at other geothermal fields in several places on campus.”In addition to geothermal energy, Affleck-Graves said Notre Dame is investigating other avenues to create a more “diversified strategy.”“[We’re] moving more and more towards renewable energy, so we arrive at a situation where most of our energy will come from renewable sources,” he said. “ … We’re looking at a hydroelectric plant on the river. We’re working with the city of South Bend, and that’s in the planning and approval stages. There’s a lot of regulation that goes around that.“We’re also looking at solar, particularly in some of the parking fields that we have, where we have large open areas that we can maybe put solar on top of parking structures, and maybe a little bit of solar on top of roofs.”When asked about the cost of moving from traditional sources of energy to renewable sources, Affleck-Graves said he did not foresee that being a large issue for the University. The cost of investing in things like a geothermal field would be high, he said, but after the field goes in there would no longer be installation costs associated with it.“I wouldn’t say it’s new money, it’s an element of new money but also the redirection of money. … Instead of a new coal fire burner, we’ll invest in another alternative source,” he said.McCarthy said because climate change is a reality now, action needs to be taken immediately to protect the disadvantaged and future generations.“It’s not just about the challenge of keeping our children safe in the future, but it is all about protecting them today, protecting the most vulnerable and making sure we meet the president’s call for us to take action and meet that moral responsibility,” she said.Tags: EPA, Notre Dame, Pope Francis, renewable energylast_img read more