Tiler Peck Fills in for Sis-In-Law Megan Fairchild at On the Town

first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 6, 2015 View Comments Peck previously appeared on Broadway previously as Gracie Shinn in The Music Man. Her regional credits include Young Marie in Susan Stroman’s Little Dancer at the Kennedy Center. Her film credits include Ballet 422, A Time for Dancing, Geppetto, Donnie Darko and more. In addition to Fairchild, On the Town stars Tony Yazbeck, Jay Armstrong Johnson, Clyde Alves, Alysha Umphress, Elizabeth Stanley, Jackie Hoffman, Michael Rupert, Allison Guinn, Phillip Boykin and Stephen DeRosa. While Fairchild is on vacation, Peck will play the role at the following performances: March 3 at 7pm, March 4 at 2pm and 8pm, March 14 at 2pm and 8pm, and March 15 at 3pm.center_img Related Shows Love-struck sailor Gabey will have his eye on new Miss Turnstiles this March. New York City Ballet principal Tiler Peck is stepping into the role of Ivy Smith in On the Town for six performances only. Peck (who is married to An American in Paris leading man Robert Fairchild) is filling in for her sister-in-law, fellow New York City Ballet principal dancer Megan Fairchild. On the Townlast_img read more

Vermont Secretary of State launches ‘Transparency Tour’ starts October 11

first_imgVermont Secretary of State Jim Condos announces he will conduct a 12 stop tour to discuss Vermont’s public records and open meeting laws with municipal and state employees and citizens who serve on local government boards. The public is invited and encouraged to attend these events. After a presentation there will be time for Q&A and a general discussion with the audience. This is a great opportunity to address specific issues that you may have questions about, and to discuss the nuances of these laws. Secretary Condos stated, ‘Open and transparent government is good government! Vermont’s citizens deserve accountability in their government.’ ‘This tour allows me to assist Vermont’s public officials who must abide by these laws every day. We recognize that these laws are not always clear and we need to hear from them regarding the challenges they face and the questions they have. I look forward to engaging in an open discussion about the importance of access to public records and public meetings.’ All events will be held from 6-8 pm. Dates and locations are as follows:Montpelier                         Pavilion Building                             Tuesday               October 11th          Colchester                          St. Mike’s College                           Thursday             October 13thNewport                              Goodrich Library                              Thursday             October 20thSt. Albans Town                Town Hall                                           Tuesday               October 25thSpringfield                         Springfield High School                Wednesday        October 26thBrattleboro                        Town Hall                                            Thursday             October 27thSt. Johnsbury                     St. J Middle School                          Tuesday               November 1stMorrisville                          Municipal Offices                            Thursday             November 3rdMiddlebury                        Ilsley Public Library                        Monday               November 7thBennington                        Fire Facility                                        Wednesday        November 9thRutland                                City Hall                                               Thursday             November 17thWhite River Junction     Bugbee Senior Center                   Tuesday               November 22nd We are pleased to welcome the participation of the following organizations: VT League of Cities and Towns, VT Municipal Clerks and Treasurers Association, VT School Boards Association, VT Press Association, VT American Civil Liberties Union and VT Common Cause. To find out more information and to RSVP, please contact Nancy Lynch @ 802-828-2148 or via email at nancy.lynch@sec.state.vt.us(link sends e-mail).last_img read more

CMHC wants you to stay mentally and emotionally well

first_imgDuring a time of crisis such as an infectious disease outbreak, everyone may show symptoms of stress, including older people and those with chronic illnesses which could make them more vulnerable to COVID-19; children and teens; responders to the crisis such as doctors, nurses, other hospital personnel, emergency services personnel, police officers, firefighters, and emergency management personnel; and people who have mental health conditions, including individuals with substance use disorders.Symptoms of stress reaction may include fear and worry about your own health and the health of loved ones and friends, changes in sleeping or eating patterns, or difficulty sleeping or concentrating among other symptoms.  “This crisis has greatly impacted all of us. We are all vigilant and concerned,” said Tom Talbot, Executive Director of Community Mental Health Center, Inc. “Doing self-care is very important for us. Try to know yourself, read your body, understand how to self-regulate, know when to give yourself a break. CMHC’s mission – Partnering for Wellness: Healthy Mind. Healthy Body. Healthy Life. – helps us stay focused on this.”There are a number of steps you can take to help you cope with the challenges of this crisis:Try to limit your exposure to news of the crisis, including on social media. Hearing constant and repeated news about the crisis can be upsetting. Use reliable sources, such as the CDC website and the Indiana State Department of Health website, to seek news and health information.Take care of yourself. Try to maintain your normal eating and sleeping habits, if at all possible. Eat healthy, well-balanced meals, and exercise regularly. Avoid consuming alcohol and drugs.Be sure to relax when you can. Do some favorite activities that you enjoy and that help you feel good, such as reading or watching a favorite TV show.Connect with others. We are continuing to discover ways to reach other online: through social media, teleconferencing, chat groups, etc. Talk with people who you trust about your concerns and how you are feeling.Maintain and practice mindfulness and spiritual wellness. Make time for practices that enhance your sense of connection to self, nature, others, and your belief in a higher power. Such practices may include prayer, meditation, and reflection.“We are all learning new ways to cope with and how to function in our world in the midst of a great upheaval. Be kind to yourself and others. Understand that it is important to embrace hope as we move into the future,” said Talbot.CMHC provides behavioral health and substance use disorders services in Dearborn, Franklin, Ohio, Ripley, and Switzerland counties. CMHC is continuing to maintain some services during the COVID-19 crisis, as behavioral health and substance use disorders services have been declared essential by Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb.For information about services, please phone the following numbers: Lawrenceburg – 812-537-7375; Batesville – 812-934-4210; Brookville – 765-647-4173; St. Leon – 812-576-1600, and Vevay – 812-427-2737. You also may contact 812-537-1302 to get information about available services. This number provides access to Emergency Services, as well, as does our 24-hour toll-free crisis line at 1-877-849-1248.last_img read more

Thiem’s FEAT

first_img– Thiem is the fifth man since the Open Era began in 1968 to come back from two sets down in a major final. He joins Gaston Gaudio (d. Guillermo Coria, 2004 French Open), Andre Agassi (d. Andrei Medvedev, 1999 French Open), Ivan Lendl (d. John McEnroe, 1984 French Open) and Bjorn Borg (d. Manual Orantes, 1974 French Open). In a US Open final, Thiem becomes the first man to come back from two sets down since 1949, when Pancho Gonzalez did the same against Ted Schroeder. – Thiem, 27, is also the first man born in the 1990s to win a Grand Slam title. On the women’s side, players born in the 1990s or later have combined to win 15 majors, including one by a woman born in the 2000s (Bianca Andreescu, 2019 US Open). – This is the first time in men’s tennis that four consecutive Grand Slam finals have gone to five sets (2019 Wimbledon, 2019 US Open, 2020 Australian Open and 2020 US Open). Before this, there had only been two instances of three straight men’s major finals going to five sets (in 1927 and 1946). – Thiem is the second Austrian player, male or female, to win a Grand Slam singles title, after Thomas Muster won the 1995 French Open. Thiem is the only Austrian to make multiple major finals, in which his win-loss record now stands at 1-3. – This was just the second men’s Grand Slam final to feature a deciding-set tiebreaker, after the 2019 Wimbledon final between Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic. Last year was the first time Wimbledon began playing a tiebreaker once the set got to 12-12. – It is the longest span (6 years) between first-time major winners on the men’s side in the Open Era. The previous longest was almost exactly three years between Juan Martin del Potro (2009 US Open) and Andy Murray (2012 US Open). Also Watch: Watch: River Flows Inside People’s Bedroomlast_img read more