U.S. Plan to Aid Coal and Nuclear Plants Gets a Bipartisan Thumbs Down From Past Regulators

first_imgU.S. Plan to Aid Coal and Nuclear Plants Gets a Bipartisan Thumbs Down From Past Regulators FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Washington Post;Energy Secretary Rick Perry’s bid to change regulations to help coal and nuclear power plants has run into unusually blunt opposition from a group of former regulators from both parties.Eight former members of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission — including five former chairmen — have filed a letter with the commission opposing Perry’s proposal that would give coal and nuclear plants credit for resilience so that they would have a better chance of beating solar, wind and natural gas competitors.The former commissioners said that Perry was seeking to reverse a quarter century of FERC reforms that have created a marketplace for electric power generators and that many of the coal plants he is aiming to help have no advantage when it comes to reliability.“His focus is clearly coal and there are a lot of dirty coal plants that are not competitive in today’s energy markets,” Elizabeth Moler, a former FERC chairwoman, former deputy energy secretary and former Exelon executive, said in an interview. “To me he’s effectively proposing to subsidize them and put a tax on consumers in doing so. It’s a tax in different clothing. It’s going to cost customers more money to run dirty old coal plants.”In early October, Perry made his proposal to FERC and asked for a decision within 60 days. He proposed that credit be given to power plants with 90-day fuel supplies on site so that they could operate during an emergency including extreme weather or a natural or man-made disaster.FERC is an independent agency, however, and some current members have indicated that the commission would make its own decision. Even one of President Trump’s nominees has stressed FERC’s independence. Robert F. Powelson, who was confirmed in August, said in a speech at the National Press Club on Oct. 16 that “the moment we put our thumbs on the scale is the moment we bastardize the process.”  In an earlier speech on Oct. 4, Powelson said “we will not destroy the marketplace.”Over the past quarter century, FERC has helped create regional electricity grid operators with the ability to accept bids from power plants to supply electricity to the grid. The competition has attracted tens of billions of dollars of investment in natural gas and renewable power sources.The former commissioners’ letter to FERC said Perry’s proposal “would be a significant step backward from the Commission’s long and bipartisan evolution to transparent, open, competitive wholesale markets” and that it “would instead disrupt decades of substantial investment made in the modern electric power system, raise costs for customers, and do so in a  manner directly counter to the Commission’s long experience.”The group wrote that “subsidizing resources so they do not retire would fundamentally distort markets. The subsidized resources would inevitably drive out the unsubsidized resources, and the subsidies would inevitably raise prices to customers.”It said that “investor confidence would evaporate and markets would tend to collapse. This loss of faith in markets would thereby undermine reliability.”Pat Wood III, who was chairman of FERC under President George W. Bush, said that “I understand the politics. I’m sympathetic.”But he said that the reliability Perry said he wanted to favor had more to do with transmission and distribution than it did with they type of fuel used.The group’s letter acknowledged that there are federal tax subsidies for every kind of fuel, but it said that “one step the Commission has never taken is to create or authorize on its own the kind of subsidy proposed here.”Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore), the ranking Democrat on the Senate Finance Committee, said Thursday that FERC should shelve the Perry proposal.“Arbitrarily propping up a dying industry goes against what the GOP has long claimed is its goal – an all-of-the-above energy strategy,” Wyden said in a statement. “This rule clearly picks winners and losers in energy resources, which robs taxpayers of the benefits of competitive markets.”More: Bipartisan group of former FERC commissioners rejects energy secretary’s bid to help coal plantslast_img read more

Mikel Obi: Nigerian quits Trabzonspor over coronavirus fears

first_imgFormer Nigeria captain and ex-Chelsea midfielder John Mikel Obi has left Turkish Super Lig leaders Trabzonspor by mutual consent, days after expressing his concerns about the league continuing amidst the global coronavirus pandemic.The Turkish top flight is one of only a handful across the world that are continuing to fulfil games, albeit behind closed doors.But on Saturday, 32-year-old Obi, who has been a major part of Trabzonspor’s title challenge, posted on social media that he disagreed with that policy. A club statement released on Tuesday said he had now ended his contract, giving up his wages in order to become a free agent.Obi had written on his Instagram that “there is more to life than football. I do not feel comfortable and do not want to play football in this situation.”“Everyone should be home with their families and loved ones in this critical time. Season should be cancelled as the world is facing such turbulent times,” it added.The post, which was made a day before Trabzonspor’s game against Istanbul Basaksehir, received positive responses from other Turkey-based former Chelsea players Radamel Falcao – who replied “you are right John” – and Didier Drogba, who commended Obi’s “words of wisdom.”The number of coronavirus cases in Turkey stood at six at the time of Obi’s post, though it has now leapt to 47.The government has ramped up measures to halt its spread, closing schools and universities, holding sports events without spectators and halting flights to many countries.Meanwhile players from Galatasaray’s basketball team released a joint statement urging the Turkish Basketball Super League to suspend games – the BSL and Britain’s BBL are the only European basketball leagues not yet suspended or cancelled.“We appreciate the Turkish Government has taken measures to slow down the spread of the virus however we find it quite bizarre that we keep playing, despite it being behind closed doors. We have seen how hesitation to take extreme action has provoked a spike in cases in neighbouring countries and we believe now is the time to take extreme action”, the statement said.last_img read more