Student trainers play key role in keeping football team healthy

first_imgAlthough they spend most of their time in the training room or on the sidelines, Notre Dame’s student trainers perform a valuable service for the football team. Working closely with the head trainers of the Sports Medicine staff, student trainers are responsible for everything from providing the players with water to assisting trainers with medical treatments. Photo courtesy of Rose Hart The football student trainers work with the head trainers and play an integral role in helping the team stay healthy.Junior Rose Hart said she wanted to be a student trainer before she was even at Notre Dame. Her brother, a former Notre Dame student, told her about the program and encouraged her to do it, she said.“I had been telling my friends since junior year of high school, ‘I’m going to be an athletic trainer at Notre Dame,’” Hart said.Student trainers’ primary responsibility is working closely with head trainers to ensure the players are healthy and hydrated on and off the field, Hart said.“We do pre- and post-practice treatments,” she said. “We’ll assist the head trainers in whatever they need us to do. It’s a lot of taping ankles, wrists, fingers.”Junior Claire Boyce works alongside Hart and said the student trainers enjoy their responsibility.“We work in the training room helping with rehab treatments and other responsibilities,” Boyce said in an email. “We also work with the football team and take pride in being ‘hydration specialists’ at practices and games.”Although games can be hectic on the field, Hart said the trainers always have a good time on football Saturdays.“Sometimes it’s a little bit of running around, making sure everything’s good,” Hart said. “Everyone’s so nice and helpful. It’s not really that stressful. It’s mostly just fun.”Not only do student trainers put in up to 20 hours of work during football season, but they sacrifice typical game day experiences, such as tailgating and cheering alongside their classmates in the student section.“Initially I thought I’d miss tailgating, but once I started working the games, I realized being on the sidelines was just as fun,” Boyce said. “Working alongside the team every day, I’m very invested in ND football, so I love getting to watch the games from the field.”Hart said she was worried about missing out during her freshman year but has come to love working on game days. This year, she worked the first two home games but had the third game against Miami (OH) off. She said she spent the day tailgating with her friends and family but missed being part of the training team.“I found myself missing being inside game day — getting to be on the field before the game, and setting up, and seeing all the pre-game things,” she said. “It’s a very different experience. I definitely don’t regret it, but sometimes my friends miss me.”Both Hart and Boyce have been student trainers since their freshman year, when they applied, interviewed and shadowed upperclassmen for a year before being selected to continue for the next three years. Hart said the student trainers have a great community with each other and the teams with which they work.“There’s about 20 of us and we’re really close, so it’s really fun,” Hart said.The student trainers even have some traditions of their own, including watching the team walk to Notre Dame Stadium before every game, Hart said.“One of my favorite things to do is after we have everything set up and we hear the band start to play, Claire and I will run up to the top of the Stadium,” Hart said. “I stand at the top and look over and can see the Main Building, the Basilica, the library and everything. I get to see the team walk in and all the fans get really excited. It’s an awesome view.”Tags: football, Football Friday Feature, Sports Medicine, Student trainerslast_img read more

Martinique team defeats Dominica Signman X-Men in basketball tournament

first_img 48 Views   no discussions Signman X-Men team membersDominica Signman X-Men returned to Dominica on Sunday after a satisfactory visit to Martinique to participate in the Charles Fidelin Invitational Basketball Tournament July 10 to 15, 2012. The teams which were expected to participate were Host Golden Star of Martinique, College Team from Canada, and Professional Team from France, St Lucia Club Team and Clayton State Lakers from Georgia USA. Regrettably St Lucia did not arrive but the games began with a schedule X-Men playing host Golden Star on Thursday and Friday, with a mix team of X-Men and Golden Star playing the team from Canada on Saturday.The other scheduled games were Canada versus France on Wednesday, Clayton State versus Canada on Thursday and France versus Clayton State on Saturday.Dominica Signman X-Men did not fare well in the first game against Golden Stars as X-Men not accustom to playing on hard wood and glass backboard did not adjust to these new conditions and for some of the players their first time at such a tournament. However the team played its best but lost to Golden Star by a score of 63 points to 50 points, top scoring for X-Men were Davidson Toulon 12 points and Joseph Hypolite 10 points.The second which by all independent accounts should have been a victory for X-Men, but in the end the home court advantages were much to overcome despite the valiant effort to defeat the host Golden Star. The final score was Golden Star 74 points to X-Men 71 points, top scoring for X-Men was guest player Ramal Carbon 35 points and Peter Ricketts 14 points. Of note the performance by Carbon and Ricketts got instant request to play in Martinique which has in place a semi-pro league offering free passage and living expenses while in Martinique with a stipend.But more interest was my discussion with the US coach when he indicated how impressed he was of Carbon and hopefully we can work something out for the young man.Press Release Share Tweet Sharecenter_img Share Sharing is caring! NewsSports Martinique team defeats Dominica Signman X-Men in basketball tournament by: – July 17, 2012last_img read more

NBA free agency news: Pau Gasol wants to play another year

first_imgStill on the mend from foot surgery, Gasol, 38, said recently in Spain he wants to continue “playing and competing at the highest level.”“The expectations are to recover and see what happens with the free agent market this summer,” he said (translated from MundoDeportivo.com). “If I recover, I think I can continue playing at a high level.” Related News Pau Gasol’s best basketball years certainly are behind him, but that doesn’t mean he’s ready to walk away from the NBA.The six-time All-Star was bought out by the Spurs in March before he signed on with the Bucks. He appeared in just three regular-season games for Milwaukee before a stress fracture in his left foot cost him the remainder of the season. “Having continuity in the Bucks is something that I think would be positive and that I would like,” Gasol said. “I made the decision to leave San Antonio to join this project that I believe has real potential to win the NBA title. This season we were close.”Gasol has enjoyed a decorated 18-year career in the NBA with six All-Star appearances and two NBA titles as a member of the Lakers. He’s averaged 17.0 points and 9.2 rebounds per game in that span.However, Gasol’s 2018-19 season showed a steep decline in his productivity. He averaged only 3.9 points and 4.6 rebounds in 12 minutes per game between the Spurs and Bucks after averaging 10.1 points and 8.0 rebounds in 2017-18. Kevin Durant may never be the same again, Achilles specialist sayscenter_img He said in March he wanted a chance to win a championship with the Bucks and stands by that desire to play in Milwaukee. Kawhi Leonard offers Kevin Durant heartfelt recovery advicelast_img read more

Ivory Coast appeals to CAS over loss of 2021 Cup of Nations

first_imgFILE PHOTOAbidjan, Ivory Coast | AFP | The Ivorian Football Federation (FIF) appealed to the Court of Arbitration for Sport against the decision to strip the country of the 2021 African Cup of Nations on Thursday.The Confederation of African Football took the 2019 tournament from Cameroon due to delays in preparations and offered it the 2021 finals, which had already been awarded to the Ivory Coast.“The FIF was surprised to learn that the president of CAF (Ahmad Ahmad) decided on his own authority, without any prior consultation … to reassign the 2021 edition, which was entrusted until then to the Ivory Coast, to Cameroon,” the FIF said in a statement. “The preparation and work required to organise this great competition, which is particularly important for all Ivorian football and the Ivory Coast, constitutes important economic, financial and human investment.”Ahmad has indicated that the Ivory Coast has now been offered the hosting rights for 2023.Share on: WhatsApplast_img read more

County Commission to Consider Body Cameras for PBSO

first_imgThe Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office says it has some catching up to do.The agency, which serves most of the county, lacks body cameras.However, that could soon change.County mayor Dave Kerner said last week that he plans to raise the idea of shifting sales-tax money, in an effort to find the nearly $19 million Sheriff Rick Bradshaw says he needs to buy the cameras.Kerner added that he plans to bring up the discussion this summer.The mayor went on to say that he had “positive” talks Tuesday with County Administrator Verdenia Baker, and had also spoken with Bradshaw.Twelve municipalities in Palm Beach County currently have body cameras, as does Florida Atlantic University’s police department.PBSO is responsible for 1,874 of the 2,227 square miles in the county.The agency is also contracted to 14 of the county’s 39 municipalities, or a combined population of 185,000 people.Its proposed 2020-2021 is about $740 million.Currently, PBSO has dashboard cameras in 960 of its 3,200 vehicles, which include patrol cars, unmarked units and support vehicles.last_img read more

Penguins fire GM Ray Shero

first_imgIn this April 12, 2012, file photo, Pittsburgh Penguins general manager Ray Shero talks with reporters as the NHL hockey team cleared out their locker room at the Consol Energy Center in Pittsburgh.  AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)PITTSBURGH (AP) – The Pittsburgh Penguins fired general manager Ray Shero on Friday while the status of coach Dan Bylsma will be evaluated.Team co-owners Mario Lemieux and Ron Burkle said it was time to take the franchise in a new direction after the team’s latest playoff flameout. The Penguins lost to the New York Rangers in the Eastern Conference semifinals this week.Assistant general manager Jason Botterill will serve as general manager on an interim basis while the team searches for Shero’s replacement.The Penguins rolled to the Metropolitan Division title this season but failed yet again to produce a bookend to the championship they won with stars Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin in 2009. Pittsburgh is just 4-5 in playoff series since raising the Stanley Cup after blowing a 3-1 series lead against New York.“We share the disappointment of our fans that we have not had success in the playoffs over the past five seasons,” Lemieux and Burkle said in a joint statement. “We believe that new leadership in the general manager’s office will bring a new approach and new energy, and help us return to championship form.”Penguins President and CEO David Morehouse didn’t blame the 51-year-old Shero’s ouster on one specific failure.“This is a decision that’s been in the works for a long time since we’ve won the Cup,” Morehouse said. “We wanted to get back to the Stanley Cup finals and we haven’t and we’re going to make some changes.”The Penguins hired Shero in 2006 and tasked him with building a foundation around Crosby that could turn Pittsburgh into a dynasty. The Penguins reached the finals in 2008 and won it all the following season thanks in part to Shero’s ability to find the right supporting cast to build around Crosby and Malkin’s otherworldly offensive talent.Shero remained aggressive in investing in a “win now” mode as the ensuing disappointments piled up. He wasn’t afraid to go “all in” as he put it last year after trading for Jarome Iginla, Jussi Jokinen, Brenden Morrow and Douglas Murray at the deadline. The moves often created headlines but little else, and splashy moves and a sellout streak seven years and counting proved no longer enough for Shero to keep his job.Morehouse believes Shero’s replacement won’t need to make an overhaul. It’s why the team started what will be a busy offseason by focusing on who will call the shots, not take them.“What we wanted to do first is address the situation at the top and the leader of the organization is the general manager,” Morehouse said. “It’s not a complete rebuild. This is a team that has had a level of success. What we’re trying to do now is get from good to great.”Whether Bylsma will be along for the ride remains unclear.The affable, open-minded Michigan native was a revelation when the Penguins promoted him from their American Hockey League affiliate in the spring of 2009, hoping his optimism would help a loaded team break out of a midseason funk.It worked brilliantly. Four months after taking the job, the former NHL nomad who spent nine seasons as a gritty fourth-line forward was raising the Cup in triumph. Considering Crosby and Malkin were both in their early 20s at the time, more parades were expected.Five years later, the wait continues. While Pittsburgh enjoyed nearly unparalleled success in the regular season – including easily capturing a division title this year despite losing more than 500-man games to injury – the Penguins again struggled to adapt in the postseason.Morehouse said the new general manager will determine whether Bylsma and the rest of the stack gets another shot. The 43-year-old Bylsma has two years remaining on his contract, the product of an extension he received last June as a vote of confidence from Shero following a four-game sweep at the hands of Boston in the Eastern Conference semifinals.The extension came with a promise to adopt a more defensive-minded approach. The Penguins even brought in longtime NHL coach Jacques Martin as an assistant, an old-school yin to Bylsma’s new-school yang.It led to a similar destination: the Penguins watching the final stages of the two-month slog to the Cup go on without them. Now they’ll try to get back to the top with a new architect.“A lot of teams would like to be where we are,” Morehouse said. “However we do have high expectations and we do want to get to them.”last_img read more

Saints bounce back into win column with 5-3 victory over Eastern Washington

first_imgThe Selkirk Saints scored four times in the second period to bounce Eastern Washington University 5-3 in B.C. Intercollegiate Hockey League Sunday afternoon in Cheney, Washington.The win allowed the Saints to end the weekend at .500 after suffering its first loss of the season, 2-1 Friday night at home against Trinity Western University.”We started slowly today, which has become a running theme over the last number of games,” said Saints head coach Jeff Dubois. “But we also put in one of our best periods in the second to take control of the game, and we limited Eastern’s chances for the most part in the third.”Leaving their game on the bus, Selkirk took six minor penalties in the opening frame and watched as the Eagles grab the early lead on a Joel Blasko power play marker.But the second period was a different story, beginning with a goal from Cody Fidgett on an early man-advantage. Minutes later, Fidgett fired a shot off the pad of Eagles starter Jason Greenwell and Beau Taylor pounced on the rebound to give the visitors their first lead of the night. EWU forward Ryan Pajimola tied the game briefly on another Eagles power-play, but the Saints responded with a pair of goals before intermission.First, Scott Swiston took a long lead pass from Ben Starbuck and fired home from the top of the circle to re-take the lead. And with just 28 seconds remaining in the frame, Jordan Wood tipped in a Lucas Hildebrand point shot to pad the Selkirk lead. Wood and Jake Flynn traded third period goals and netminder Stephen Wolff came up big with a breakaway save off Pajimola to help preserve the two-goal lead. Wolff made 30 saves on the day to pick up the victory in his first start since November 10th.” It was good to get back on a winning note right away, especially with a weekend off coming up,” Dubois explained.”I think the sense of urgency kicked in after the first that we didn’t want to lose back-to-back games going into a break and from there they guys responded the right way.” Selkirk, which started the season setting a new BCIHL record with 13 staright wins, is now off until Friday, February 1 when the team travels to Kamloops to face Thompson Rivers University.The Saints’ next home game comes one night later when Simon Fraser University visits the Castlegar Rec Complex.last_img read more

49ers at Washington: 5 keys to staying undefeated

first_imgSANTA CLARA – For the fourth time in six games, the 49ers are on the road. It seemed like a brutal opening act when the schedule was unveiled in April, especially knowing their recent road history.“I know we didn’t win a single road game last year, preseason or regular season, so those plane rides were not very fun,” tight end George Kittle recalled.New year, new results.As the undefeated 49ers (5-0) go to visit Washington (1-5), they are not spooked by an away game. Of course it helped …last_img read more

Southern Africa is running dry

first_imgForty one million people in the SADC region of Africa are in need of humanitarian food aid. The worst drought in 35 years is a result of a changing climate and Africa will need to adapt to this new normal. Africa needs to start planning for a world where extreme weather is the new normal. (Image: World Vision)Sulaiman PhilipAcross the Southern African Development Community (SADC) fields are barren, rivers have long dried up and livestock is left neglected and bedraggled as the territory suffers the worst drought in the last 35 years.Four SADC states – Lesotho, Malawi, Swaziland and Zimbabwe – have declared national emergencies. Mozambique has declared a 90-day red alert in some areas. Seven of South Africa’s nine provinces are drought disaster areas. According to a recently released SADC report, Vulnerability Assessment Results, 2.7 million children are suffering from acute malnutrition; 41 million people face food insecurity and of those, 21 million people need immediate assistance.In June, Botswana’s president and SADC chairperson, Ian Khama, called on the international community to provide humanitarian aid. At the beginning of August he will begin the formal process of declaring the region a disaster area.The designation as a disaster zone unlocks substantial humanitarian aid and funding from the international community. This shock funding allows governments to pay for disaster relief without tapping into national reserves or borrowing.In a statement released by SADC he said that the 2016 harvest would not feed the region and 23 million people faced imminent starvation. Khama will appeal for $2.7-billion (R38-billion) worth of humanitarian and drought relief, and to help strengthen the region’s safety net.“The appeal will be a formal request to the international community to provide assistance to affected member states,” he said. “The severe drought conditions have already taken [their] toll on lives and livelihoods and the situation could deteriorate further if urgent assistance is not provided.”Drought effectsIn 2015, South Africa – traditionally the bread basket of the region – received the lowest rainfall since records began in 1904. It has been a century since South Africa’s pastures have been this dry. In Malawi half of all children under five are malnourished and President Peter Mutharika has declared a national disaster.Despite the drought, South Africa produces more grain than it did two decades ago but harvests are half of what they were two years ago. The last harvest was 9.9 million tons, this year it is expected to be even lower, with just 7.4 million tons available.Maize, the staple food of the region, is now so expensive it is a luxury. The region has also depleted its stockpile of grain reserves. For landlocked countries such as Zimbabwe and Malawi, food costs will double as a result of transport costs from ports in South Africa and Mozambique.In villages in Zimbabwe’s Chivi District and the Neno District in Malawi families are resorting to desperate measures to fill their empty stomachs. A story in Britain’s The Guardian newspaper highlighted the plight of Chidyamakondo High School in southern Zimbabwe. For three years the schools girls’ football team have been national champions. Now Morrison Musorowegomo, the school’s head teacher, told the newspaper’s correspondent: “Students are fainting, struggling to concentrate in lessons, dropping out of school… We’re having to shorten our assemblies and cut back on sport.”Students are also dropping out of school to help families scavenge for food. Even more heart-breaking for Musorowegomo, his students are vulnerable enough to be coerced into exchanging sex for food or cash.Food is a human rights issue, says Malawi’s deputy director for school health and nutrition, Virginia Kachigunda. “We are really at a point where we need support. This is a situation which will eventually recycle poverty in these families. It’s a serious problem.”Climate changeAfrica faces challenges caused by the changing global climate. The environment of SADC is especially fragile and is being affected by higher land and ocean temperatures. In coming decades these changes will alter the weather and will affect when the rainfall season begins; in turn, this will change the agricultural cycle.Historically there was one regional drought every decade, then every five years. The cycle has now sped up and SADC countries are affected every three to five years. Mary Robinson, UN special envoy on El Niño and climate, says El Niño affected by climate change is the new normal. She believes that humanitarian disasters will get worse as the climate changes.Aid workers say that the response should be built on longer term planning. World Vision’s Beatrice Mwangi says this latest drought has shown the need to help affected communities plan for the new reality. Communities need food aid, she adds, but more importantly they need help adapting to the changing climate.The leaders of SADC countries understand that economic development will be hamstrung by more frequent floods, droughts and cyclones. They understand that climate change will damage agricultural infrastructure and that they need to adapt to preserve the progress the region has made. SADC has signed commitments with the World Food Programme that recognise adapting to climate change is an area of co-operation.The African Ministerial Conference on the Environment (Amcen) has developed a framework for the region to deal with the challenges it could face. The aim, it says in the report, is “to unlock resources for promoting strategic interventions that sustain productivity and livelihood improvements for millions of climate-vulnerable people in the region”.last_img read more