Corruption Risk Seen in Australian Coal Deals

first_imgCorruption Risk Seen in Australian Coal Deals FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The Guardian:A new report shines a critical light on the links between mining companies, lobbyists and politicians, pointing to the Indian mining giant Adani as an example of how a company with a questionable record overseas can still gain mining approval in Australia.It warns the political mining complex in Australia’s two biggest mining states, Western Australian and Queensland, is “susceptible to corruption” due to key weaknesses in their approvals regimes, including inadequate due diligence investigation into the companies and individuals applying for mining leases.It also criticises the “revolving doors” of personnel between government and industry broadly, and political donations regimes.The report, published by Transparency International Australia (TIA), Corruption Risks: Mining Approvals in Australia, was released on Wednesday.Its authors conducted 47 interviews with experts from government, industry, civil society, academics, Indigenous traditional owners and consultants in Perth and Brisbane to gather its evidence. Its list of key weaknesses in the mining approvals regimes is long.The researchers says “industry influence” is a corruption risk in Australia, particularly with regard to large infrastructure project approvals in Queensland and WA.It notes the mining industry has disclosed donations of $16.6m to major political parties over the past 10 years (2006-07 to 2015-16), and warns the under-regulated system of political donations can allow special interest groups to attempt to influence policy-making at all levels of government.It highlights the “revolving doors” of personnel between government an industry as a risk in Australia generally.It points out 191 of 538 lobbyists (35.5%) registered by the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, as of September 2016, were former government representatives.The researchers also warn government departments involved in the mining approvals process in Queensland and WA do not undertake adequate due diligence into the character and integrity of applicants for mining leases, including companies’ track records overseas, and investigations of their financial capacity do not involve an examination of beneficial ownership to understand who the real owners are.The Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis also warned this week that Adani’s ambitions in Queensland faced a new risk, with the company having to refinance more than $2bn in debt on the Abbot Point coal terminal – more than it paid for the port in 2011.More: Mining companies’ links with politicians ‘susceptible to corruption’ – reportlast_img read more

USCG Grants BWM System Approval to Chinese Firm

first_imgChina’s Sunrui Marine Environment Engineering has received a Ballast Water Management System (BWMS) type approval certificate from the United States Coast Guard Marine Safety Center.The fourth certificate was issued after a detailed review of the manufactures type approval application determined the system met the requirements of 46 CFR 162.060.The Sunrui BalClor system incorporates a three step process consisting of filtering and electrolysis during uptake and neutralization at discharge. This approval covers fourteen models with maximum treatment rated capacities between 170m3/h and 8500m3/h.In early December, the USCG awarded the first type approval certificate to Norwegian ballast water treatment (BWT) specialist Optimarin for its Optimarin Ballast System (OBS).Later the same month, Swedish Alfa Laval Tumba AB and Norway-based OceanSaver AS received BWMS type approval certificates.The Alfa Laval PureBallast 3 system incorporates four ultraviolet reactor sizes, which can be arranged either individually or in parallel to achieve treatment capacities ranging from 85m3/h to 3000m3/h.The OceanSaver BWTS MKII incorporates an electro-chlorination, or electrodialysis, process to achieve treatment capacities ranging from 200m3/h to 7200m3/h.last_img read more