The Latest: Gymnastics seeking new host for championships

first_imgThe Latest: Gymnastics seeking new host for championships The head of English soccer says he does not expect crowds to be allowed back into matches “any time soon.”The Premier League and other soccer competitions in England have been suspended two months during the coronavirus pandemic.The English Football Association, which owns Wembley Stadium and runs the national teams, is cutting its annual budget by 75 million pounds ($93 million) as it tries to offset a potential “worst-case scenario” deficit of 300 million pounds over the next four years.FA chairman Greg Clarke says “with social distancing in place for some time to come we do face substantial changes to the whole football ecosystem.”In a letter to the FA Council, Clarke says “it’s hard to foresee crowds of fans – who are the lifeblood of the game – returning to matches any time soon.” Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditThe Latest on the effects of the new coronavirus outbreak on sports around the world:___The search is on for a new host for the women’s European gymnastics championships. The English Football League, which operates the three professional divisions below the Premier League, has told clubs games might be played without fans until 2021.The Premier League is trying to find a way of restarting next month. Liverpool is 25 points clear with nine games remaining.The FA Cup quarterfinals are yet to be played.___More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports,Tampa Bay Lightning advance to face Dallas Stars in Stanley Cup finals, beating New York Islanders 2-1 in OT in Game 6 May 4, 2020 European Gymnastics, the continental governing body, says that France isn’t able to host the championships if they’re rescheduled to the fall of 2020, so the “call for a new host is open.”The championships were meant to take place in Paris from April 29 through May 3 as a tune-up ahead of the Olympics but were canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic. European Gymnastics is still hoping to stage them on a new date.European Gymnastics says the men’s European championships will remain in host nation Azerbaijan on rescheduled dates later this year, and the rhythmic gymnastics championships will stay in Ukraine.It’s looking for a new host for the European trampoline championships to replace Sweden. That event has been moved from this month to spring 2021.___ Associated Press last_img read more

After coming out, hack struggles to find self-acceptance

first_imgI was drunk and lonely at my own going away party, four days away from calling Syracuse home for the next four years. I’d been nervously looking forward to what was in my future. A new home with new friends. New classes and a new life. This was a night to celebrate the excitement of looking forward. But I was looking back.The late hours of Aug. 17, 2012 were creeping into the early ones of the following day. Everything before has run together, and the days after are a blur. The day I first came out. The day I first said “I’m gay” out loud, instead of letting it repeat in my head, over and over and over. I just wanted to tell someone before I left for college. It was a goal that consumed me. It was a goal that I was constantly aware I was failing at.My right shoulder rested on the living room armchair, my left hand carrying the drink that I was slowly sipping on. I blocked out the 50 drunk high schoolers around me dancing to music blasting out of the small speakers on my counter top. People would come up and talk to me, asking if I was OK. Each time I wanted to just come clean and be honest, break down into an emotional mess and say everything that was isolated to my own tormented head.I had gone every day of my life that I could remember wanting to say it. Different loops of when, where, how and who ran through my mind in what felt like every waking moment.The party made worse everything that was already making me sad. It’s hard to pinpoint why I was too scared to say it. I can’t really explain why I pulled my best friend aside later that night and finally did say it. All I know is that expressing it out loud in the long and echoing hallway of my apartment building felt liberating in the moment.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textEverything would be easy after that, I had convinced myself. But the short-term relief hasn’t provided me the same long-term liberation that I had hoped and expected. Not even close. Today, as I write this, I feel the same as I did four years before.I’ve spent the four years since as a writer, editor and general addict of The Daily Orange. Each and every single one of my 624 bylines has told someone else’s story. The past three months alone have included stops to St. Louis, Chicago, North Carolina, Queens, Houston and even a Donald Trump rally. I started by covering women’s tennis as a freshman, and finished by covering the Final Four to end my senior year.This is the last time my name will appear, and this is the last chance I have to tell the story that defines me. It’s a story that I thought, by now, would be easy to tell.In the days after my first coming out story, I felt like a pro at telling people.The next afternoon I told two of my friends on two different walks. One on Broadway near my home, the other in Central Park. I told another on Facebook chat and one over text. I told my freshman year roommate over the partial wall of our split double. (I was the first gay person he’d ever met!) I let down a girl who liked me at a party. I told people that were my friends and people that weren’t. I was riding a high, but it didn’t feel natural. I still had an uneasy lump in my gut before the words ever came out. It felt relieving, but it didn’t feel right. It didn’t feel like I was telling people about the person I wanted to be, just the person that I was.It wasn’t because I got negative reactions. In fact, I only got support. Sure, some people were surprised. Others said awkward things or asked awkward questions. One person apologized for not knowing, another proclaimed they always knew. Everyone accepted me. Except me.It’s supposed to be easy now. It’s no longer weird and people don’t judge you. The Supreme Court said gay people could get married, everyone changed their profile picture on Facebook for a day and it became normal, maybe even mainstream. I wish I was one of those people who could blindly bandwagon with the rest. But seeing the celebration of others only adds to the torture because it reminds me of a feeling I don’t think I can have. I’m a part of a community that I don’t feel like I fit into.There are so many success stories about people being themselves. It gets better, I’ve heard. It might not be a secret anymore, but it’s still a struggle. It was before I wrote this and will be after.Having this platform to write shows what I’ve accomplished. I came to The Daily Orange to write about sports. I lived a dream come true. But it’s also served as a way to perpetuate what I didn’t accomplish, and may never will.I still look back to Aug. 17, 2012, and to the hours that crept into the morning after. I remember how I felt, because it’s how I still feel. In that moment, I wanted the courage to tell people the truth. In this moment, I’m still trying to live that truth.Sam Blum is a senior staff writer at The Daily Orange, where his column will no longer appear. He can be reached at sblum@syr.edu or @SamBlum3.-30- Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on May 1, 2016 at 9:54 pmlast_img read more

Watch EPL Live: Machester United Vs Stoke City on JOY Sports on Multi TV

first_imgTune in to JOYSports and ADOM TV on MULTI TV this and every Saturday for live action from the English Premier League as Manchester United taking on the stubborn Stoke City @ 2:00pm prompt.Expert Pre-match analyses with Kwame Dwomoh-Agyemang and his team commences at 1:30pm with Kick off at 2:00pm. Remember that this game is exclusive to JOYSports, your 24 Sports Channel on Multi TV.MATCH FACTSSir Alex Ferguson’s autobiography may have given Manchester United a sly boost by resurrecting his beloved siege mentality. The only current player to come under quote worthy criticism, Wayne Rooney, has merely reaffirmed his allegiance to David Moyes – a manager many doomsayers predicted he wouldn’t work well with – and once more the Old Trafford gates clang shut to outsiders.Rooney went on to inspire a narrow but important defeat of Real Sociedad, and few would doubt he could do the same against struggling Stoke; with Norwich (in the League Cup), Fulham and Sociedad up next, United could build a fair head of steam before meeting Arsenal. Crisis?What crisis?  Three little points but eight huge places below Moyes, Mark Hughes has a similar job on: changing the attitudes of a club dominated by its previous manager. At least it’s a change that most fans and players wanted, but Stoke wouldn’t have chosen to be 16th, just a point above the relegation zone.  JOY Sports ………….. the thrill of the gamelast_img read more