Mesa announces acquisition of Intellaspace

first_imgTim Williams, president of Mesa Contract Inc., announced the acquisition of Intellaspace from office furniture manufacturer, Weber Knapp. Mesa will continue the Intellaspace brand, providing office furniture dealers with soltuions to meet or exceed ergonomic standards for the workplace. The company will also expand on its portfolio of ergonomic office solutions.Mesa Contract is a manufacturer/distributor of premium ergonomic office accessories, wood desk solutions and steel components.For more information visit www.intellaspace.com(link is external) and www.mesacontract.com(link is external).last_img read more

What we can learn from the Brexit vote

first_img 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Henry Meier As General Counsel for the New York Credit Union Association, Henry is actively involved in all legislative, regulatory and legal issues impacting New York credit unions. Whether he’s joining … Web: www.nycua.org Details With State Legislatures shutting down and Congress going into a summer hiatus now is that time of year when credit unions stop and wonder why they even bother with politics. After all, the bankers seem to have as big a stranglehold as ever over the legislative process and core initiatives, like lifting the MBL cap on the national level or getting municipal deposit authority in states like New York, seem to be a long time away. Why bother making the effort if there is a pretty good chance it will lead to nothing? As a political junkie I love this stuff but I understand this frustration, to a point.Is politics frustrating, futile and even unseemly a good chunk of the time?  Yes? Is the legislative process so bad that it is better to walk away from it all together? Absolutely not.This brings us to Great Britain’s vote to leave the EU. One of the main reasons people voted for leaving is because the referendum empowered them to unequivocally get something done and poke “the establishment” in the eye for not listening to them. A legislative process never would have led to such a decisive decision. It would have tried to placate interest groups, checked with economists and ultimately come up with a proposal to incrementally change the EU.  The funny thing is I bet the majority of Brits would vote for such a muddled unsatisfying result now that they know that there really are negative consequences to living the EU.You see a similar impulse in this country. One of the Appeals of The Donald is his commitment to changing the way things are done consequences be dammed .The problem is that Democracy isn’t about majority rule or getting what you want. Not even the most powerful groups like the NRA, the teachers unions or bankers get what they want all the time. Democracy at its best is about a willingness to muddle through and, overtime, and coupled with a willingness to engage all levers at your disposal get policy makers to listen. If you are really lucky you might get something accomplished.Is it worth it to be part of this unproductive muddle? Well would the industry exist today if the only lobbyists legislators got information from were banking lobbyists? Are you better off today because credit unions complained about the Durbin amendment? And are we better off today because an increasing number of state legislatures are giving their state charters the FOM flexibility they need to grow?The fact is that, as an industry, credit unions have a record of success they can be proud of. I’m getting nervous though that as the years of legislative dysfunction pile up that there ae more and more people who are willing to walk away from the legislative process all together. This is too bad. With enough persistence we will get at least some of what we need but only if we stay engaged and don’t look for the easy way out.last_img read more

Syracuse suffers 41-17 blowout loss at Louisville

first_imgSU went three-and-out on the ensuing possession and pushed Louisville back to the 11-yard line. Five plays later on fourth-and-2 from Louisville’s own 48, Bolin looked to his left, where Syracuse had everyone covered up. He turned back to his right and found a wide-open Keith Towbridge for an eventual 32-yard gain because an Orange defender missed an assignment, defensive coordinator Chuck Bullough said.Louisville eventually scored to go up 21-10 at halftime and as the game progressed, the floodgates opened against an SU defense that struggled because of a lack of in-game adjustments, Bullough said.“That’s the pickle we have right now,” Bullough said. “We’re not old enough to have those adjustments and put them on the field.”At one point, SU’s entire defensive line was made up of freshmen, a position group that was already limited when senior defensive end Luke Arciniega was ruled out with an upper-body injury on Thursday.Once Syracuse was trailing 21-10 at halftime, it was forced to be more aggressive, offensive coordinator Tim Lester said. The Orange attempted 21 passes in the second half compared to 15 in the first. Syracuse had three three-and-outs in the second half and not a single drive went for more than 44 yards.“When you’re down, you take shots,” Lester said. “First down shot. Second down incomplete. And then you get into third-and-10. That’s naturally going to happen when we’re more aggressive.”With the loss, Syracuse has nearly no room for error if it wants to become bowl eligible. Three games remain and No. 3 Clemson comes to the Carrier Dome next week. SU has never beaten a ranked team under Shafer and has allowed more than 40 points in four of the last five weeks.When asked if he feels like there’s been improvement, Franklin said, “It’s always tough to say that when you keep losing games by large margins.”Saturday was just another example. Comments LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Zaire Franklin stood at Louisville’s 15-yard line. Kyle Bolin lay on the ground. Cole Hikutini had the ball in his hands in the end zone.Franklin had a free rush on the Louisville quarterback, hit him in the chest and knocked him to the turf as he threw.But Bolin squeezed the throw into a narrowing window to Hikutini and Syracuse’s hopes of winning began to narrow, too.“Those types of plays, I always feel like I’m so close, but I’m never close enough,” Franklin said.That play gave Louisville (5-4, 4-2 Atlantic Coast) an 18-point lead with more than nine minutes left in the third quarter of an eventual 41-17 win. It cemented a stretch in which the Cardinals scored touchdowns on two of four possessions, excluding a pick-six that immediately preceded it.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textLouisville’s 21 straight points in just more than 10 minutes of game time between the second and third quarters was the turning point of Saturday afternoon’s game at Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium. Thirteen more in the second half buried the Orange (3-6, 1-4). In the same time frame after the interception, SU’s drives ended with three punts and a missed field goal.“It stings,” SU head coach Scott Shafer said. “It stings bad.”Syracuse got off to a fast start with a two-play touchdown possession after a Cordell Hudson interception. But it all fell apart for Syracuse following Eric Dungey’s interception.Louisville’s Trumaine Washington jumped in front of the intended out route and had 39 yards of open field in front of him. Dungey was the last offensive player back to the Orange’s sideline as he walked off the field after throwing a pick-six for the first time in his career. It was the first of three turnovers the freshman had in the game before getting hit in the head and leaving the game.Jessica Sheldon | Staff Photographer Published on November 7, 2015 at 4:07 pm Contact Paul: pmschwed@syr.edu | @pschweds Related Stories Blum: Eric Dungey should have been taken out before 4th-quarter injuryGallery: Syracuse falls to Louisville, 41-17Storify: Syracuse fans react to blowout loss at Louisville Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

DeVry bows to change and plans move to mall

first_imgDeVry sold the land in West Hills for $36 million in September to the real estate investment firm Multi-Employer Property Trust, according to MEPT’s Web site. Now DeVry leases 35,000 square feet at the mall, and has as neighbors The Cheesecake Factory, Pacific Theaters Galleria 16, and DSW. The school charges between $250 and $280 per credit and has three semesters spread throughout the calendar year. Its online classes allow students to read lectures and complete assignments at any time. Like the changing student population at DeVry, schools nationwide are enrolling more students in distance learning classes. Four years ago there were 1.5 million students on-line, according the Sloan Consortium, an organization committed to quality online education based at Babson College in Massachusetts. Now there are almost 3.5 million students online out of 17 million higher education students. WEST HILLS – Enrollment is strong at the DeVry University campus here, but many of its classrooms are only partly full. Over the past few years, the student population has shifted from on campus to online, diminishing the need for classroom space. In response, DeVry is leaving its 108,000-square-foot campus in West Hills next month for a smaller space in the Sherman Oaks Galleria mall. “The physical presence of students on site has shrunk,” said Iraj Borbor, who has been dean of the West Hills campus since it opened in 1999. “We found that we were not really utilizing our space efficiently.” In 2002, one in 12 students took classes online across the 84 DeVry campuses nationwide, according to the school. Now, four out of five do at DeVry, a public for-profit university based in Illinois. “We don’t see it plateauing any time soon,” said Elaine Allen, a statistics professor and researcher at the Consortium. “All we see is the trajectory going up in double digits.” About half of all public institutions offer some form of online education. Internet classes have helped the University of Phoenix become the largest institution of higher learning in the country with campuses far from its namesake. Some schools, like Capella University, do not offer any courses on campus. In the Valley, Pierce College, Los Angeles Mission College and California State University, Northridge all offer online classes. “We hear from our mid-career professionals that this is the way they want to learn,” said Marcella Tyler, spokeswoman at the Tseng College of Extended Learning at CSUN. As on-line schooling grows, concerns over the level of academic integrity persist. At the Web site elearners.com, a clearinghouse for information about online education, chat room posts address cheating. “Personally, I can see how someone with enough money and not enough time might be tempted to fall into such a trap and offer to pay another individual to take the classes for them,” writes a user called Steve. Another post, from a user called Trchaj, said he thought “online schools have the same issues as traditional schools.” Michael Heberling, president of the Center for Graduate Studies at Baker College in Michigan, would agree. Heberling researched the issue for his paper, “Maintaining Academic Integrity in Online Education,” which was published in the spring 2002 edition of the Online Journal of Distance Learning. “Sure it’s easier to cheat online, but it’s also much easier to detect than in a traditional class,” Heberling said. Teachers are more familiar with students’ writing style because pupils submit written questions and comments, instead of asking them aloud. This familiarity makes it easier for instructors to recognize fraudulent work, he said. Having electronic copies of papers also makes it easier for teachers to compare large sections of text to essays purchased online. Web sites like turnitin.com and plagiserve.com allow teachers to “search in reverse.” Tina Peters, who teaches an on-line class at DeVry and researches user experiences for the school, attacked another myth about distance learning. “I think the conception with taking a class online is that’s is easy,” she said. “But a lot of students are surprised by the rigor.” julia.scott@dailynews.com (818) 713-3735 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more