Vermont’s Creative Economy

first_imgVERMONT ARTS COUNCIL CELEBRATES 40 YEARS OF SUPPORTINGTHE “CREATIVE ECONOMY”Arts Council applauds today’s release of “Advancing Vermont’s CreativeEconomy”by the Vermont Council on Rural DevelopmentMontpelier, Vt. (October 4, 2004) The release today of “AdvancingVermont’s Creative Economy” by the Vermont Council on Rural Development clearly shows that there are social and economic benefits to investing in the arts and culture. According to the report, communities that have thriving cultural centers are more likely to attract business and entrepreneurs than those that do not. The Vermont Arts Council has been working under this premise 1964 and, coincidentally, will begin at year-long celebration of its 40th anniversary this month.”The release of this report couldn’t come at a better time,” said artist, teacher, and Chair of the Arts Council’s board of trustees, Irwin Gelber of Barnet. “Next week, on October 16th at Marlboro College, the Council will kick off the celebration of its 40th Anniversary. It is a great anniversary gift to have this public recognition of what we, who work in the arts, have always known: The arts are central to our quality of life. The arts play a major and often pivotal role in our economy and perhaps most importantly, the arts are a priority in our children’s education.”In addition to providing individual grants and awards to Vermont artists, the Arts Council promotes enduring ways to make the arts a part of all Vermont communities, bringing enjoyment and inspiration to citizens and visitors in all corners of the state. To accomplish this, the Arts Council partners with other public benefit organizations at the local, state and national level, as well as with the private sector in education, human services, and economic development.The Cultural Facilities Grant Program is just one example of how the Arts Council supports a “creative economy.” The Cultural Facilities Grant Program, which is funded by the Legislature and administered by the Vermont Arts Council, provides grants for the improvement of community facilities that provide cultural activities. Recipients of Cultural Facilities Grants include: the Vergennes Opera House, the renovation of which sparked a renewal of the entire downtown area; improvements to the stage lighting at Damon Hall in Hartland; and the addition of accessible restrooms to the Hardwick Town House in the Northeast Kingdom. The “Advancing Vermont’s Creative Economy” report recommends a 400% increase in funding for this grant program from its current $50,000 level to $200,000 annually.”The Cultural Facilities Grant Program is ‘the little engine that could’ of downtown redevelopment and community renaissance,” said Alex Aldrich, Executive Director of the Vermont Arts Council. “Most of the grants we award go toward the improvement of historical buildings in the heart of Vermont’s communities so that a greater variety of cultural activities can be provided to the people of those communities.”Aldrich also sees huge potential in the report’s recommendation #8 that Vermont’s state economists “Track and Report the Impact of the State’s Creative Economy.” “For years, those of us in the arts, humanities, and preservation fields, have seen the impact of our work on community development. Now we have an independent and authoritative voice advocating that this sector deserves public research and investment,” said Aldrich.The Vermont Arts Council was founded in 1964 with a mission to support artists and strengthen the role of the arts in the lives of people and communities. The Council fosters classical, traditional, and emerging forms of artistic expression by functioning as a community partner and a catalyst for artists and organizations. It offers professional development opportunities and technical advice, collects and disseminates arts information, and acts as the state’s foremost arts advocate. For more information about the Vermont Arts Council or its 40th Anniversary Celebration, please call (802) 828-5422 or visit www.vermontartscouncil.org(link is external).Executive SummaryThe creative economy is critical to the future competitiveness of Vermont in the global marketplace. Vermonts heritage, arts and culture are integral strengths. They are an economic sector in Vermont today; they also provide a foundation to the sense of place and creative workforce critical to innovation in other sectors, add value to the Vermont brand, and magnify the attractive power of Vermont as a location to do business. The creative economy is a hidden economic driver, one that deserves understanding, recognition, and investment.The Vermont Council on Culture and Innovation (VCCI) was convened in May 2003 by the Vermont Council on Rural Development. VCCIs charge was to evaluate the role of and challenges to the creative economy in the state and to build a practical and strategic plan for its advancement. This Action Plan is the product of that work. This report makes specific recommendations for how to grow the States creative economy as a vital and complementary part of the states economy as a whole. These recommendations encourage collaboration among Vermonts private sector, cultural organizations, and local, state, and federal government to use Vermonts cultural resources to spark and leverage community and economic development. It documents seventeen recommendations in the four areas listed below that the Governors adminis-tration,Legislature, and public and private partners are encouraged to undertake to expand innovation, enhance community life, attract and encourage entrepreneurs, build Vermonts market identity, and stimulate job growth. Support the Growth of Creative Enterprises by expanding markets, unifying promotion, enhancing the Vermont brand, producing celebratory events, building a Vermont artists and artisans market identity, and providing technical support and access to capital for culturally-based businesses and creative entrepreneurs. Promote and Document the Roles that Creativity, Culture, and Innovation Play in Vermonts Economic Future by tracking and reporting this economic sector, reinforcing arts and heritage education, and instituting a statewide public information campaign.Invest in Communities so They May Build on their Past while Adapting for a Vibrant Future by making culture and heritage priority community investments, supporting historic town and village centers, expanding cultural facilities funding, and encouraging creative entrepreneurial development in vacant industrial space. Develop Vermonts Creative Economy through Community-Based Planning and Improved Statewide Collaboration by facilitating locally designed creative economy projects, building a collaborative umbrella between statewide cultural organizations, and establishing a nonpartisan Governors Commission to provide leadership for the growth of Vermonts creative economy.:Evidence shows that public and private investment in creative enterprises yields favorable economic and social returns,producing jobs and supporting communities.:The development of the creative economy in Vermont is not limited by geography,topography,demographics,or population density.It can play a vital role in every corner of the state.:Just as Vermont was a leader in the manufacturing of things, it is now poised to be a leader in the production of ideas. Like any promising economic sector,the creative economy will need policies and incentives to support its growth.:Strengthening the creative sector will take a long-term and incremental effort.However,pressing needs must be addressed now in order to assure its future competitiveness.:Creative and stimulating communities attract and retain young people.This is a key concern in Vermont,where the loss of its youth to other regions is an historic challenge.:The emerging jobs market places a premium on creative problem solving,yet these skills are not taught consistently throughout Vermont s education system.www.kse50.com/vcci_report.pdf(link is external)last_img read more

Inspirational clubs are England Golf Award finalists

first_img Six inspirational golf clubs are the latest finalists to be announced for the prestigious 2017 England Golf Awards. The clubs, from Cornwall, Hertfordshire, Kent, Suffolk, Sussex and Yorkshire, will be on tenterhooks until the winners of the three categories are announced at a celebration ceremony at Lord’s Cricket Ground on Thursday, 16 March. All six are stand-out examples of clubs which go the extra mile to give the best possible experience to members, visitors and potential new players. But the competition is particularly intense between the finalists in the Strongest Community Engagement Award, which are both operated by Mytime Active.   England Golf Chief Executive Nick Pink said: “These six finalists are fantastic clubs which put their customers first and help to show that golf is a welcoming sport for all. We look forward to highlighting their great work at the England Golf Awards.” The Awards will celebrate all that’s excellent about golf in England. They will recognise leading professionals, elite amateurs, top coaches and the stars of club and county golf who do so much to inspire people to play the game. The latest finalists: GolfMark Club of the Year sponsored by TaylorMade-adidas Golf Essendon Country Club, Hertfordshire Essendon combines the best of golfing tradition with innovative approaches to offer a warm welcome. The club values and listens to its customers and offers great golf and social opportunities for members and non-members, including Pilates and yoga sessions. Busy adult and junior academies have a 100% conversion rate into membership via special introductory packages. The club uses GolfMark to measure progress and identify areas to improve and develop. The Point at Polzeath, Cornwall The club’s owners have used GolfMark to create a thriving business which bucks industry trends and they hope to double it in size over the next three years. The Point is both a golf club and a leisure hub for the local community and holidaymakers, offering facilities such as a health club and hosting the annual Polzeath Beer Festival, which is combined with get into golf activities. It was the Cornwall GolfMark Club of the Year for 2015. Most Welcoming Golf Club, sponsored by american golf Fynn Valley Golf Club, Suffolk The club started 25 years ago, believing golf should be accessible to everyone and the bar has always been open to all, with no dress code. There’s a strong golfing and social programme, great coaching opportunities and an annual ‘give golf a go’ day aimed at families. New members receive a comprehensive welcome pack and plenty of help to settle in and find playing partners. Communication with staff, members and visitors is excellent. Leeds Golf Centre, Yorkshire A ‘welcome’ sign at the entrance, good signposting, no dress code – first impressions count at this golf centre and help to attract new players. New members are introduced to playing partners and surveyed regularly to make sure they’re enjoying their golf. Coaching for all, golfing and social events for members and non-members, an emphasis on short format golf – and an in-house sports rehab physio are all features of this club. Strongest Community Engagement Bromley Golf Centre, Kent Bromley takes golf into the community, for example to schools and leisure centres, to attract people who had never thought of playing. This includes children, young adults, inactive over 60s, local residents with learning difficulties and those living with disabilities. Flexible dress codes and free club hire are other ways of removing barriers. It’s also the first branded Golf Express centre in the country, promoting shorter formats to busy people. Hollingbury Park Golf Course, Sussex Hollingbury Park thinks outside the box to find new ways to introduce local people to golf and its wellbeing benefits. For example, a Christmas open air cinema for families attracted 600 people who received information about children’s birthday parties, free golf taster sessions and other offers, which all had a good take-up. It takes part in local sports festivals, hosts an open week for all, and works with local schools, companies and organisations. More finalists will be announced next week. The England Golf Awards are attracting influential names from the golf and sporting world and tickets cost just £75 per person; anyone booking a table of 10 will get one place free. Everyone attending will be entered in a free draw for prizes including tickets to The Open, a Middlesex Match Day at Lord’s, the Ricoh Women’s British Open and a fourball at Frilford Heath Golf Club. Click here to book. 17 Feb 2017 Inspirational clubs are England Golf Award finalists last_img read more