Six Nations grandmother braces for a killers appeal hearing

first_imgAPTN National NewsA Six Nations grandmother is speaking out after a new trial was ordered for a man convicted of killing her pregnant granddaughter.Tashina General was found buried in a shallow grave in Six Nations six months after she went missing. She was four months pregnant.APTN’s Delaney Windigo has this story.last_img

Half chance for normal monsoon

first_imgThe probability of the South West monsoon this year being ‘Near Normal’ is 39 per cent, ‘Below Normal’ is 32 per cent and ‘Deficient’ is 17 per cent, the India Meteorological Department (IMD) has declared while making its first stage Long Range Forecast (LRF) on April 15, 2019. “The South West seasonal monsoon rainfall (June to September) over the country as a whole is likely to be near normal,” the national weather forecaster said. It also suggested that the probability of there being an ‘above normal’ monsoon is 10 per cent and that of it being ‘excess’ is two per cent. Also Read – A special kind of bondQuantitatively, the seasonal monsoon rainfall (June-September) was likely to be 96 per cent of the Long Period Average (LPA), with a model error of ± 5 per cent, said the IMD. “Overall, the country is expected to have well-distributed rainfall scenario during the 2019 monsoon season, which will be beneficial to farmers in the country during the ensuing Kharif season,” a statement by the IMD read. “Weak El Nino conditions are likely to prevail during the monsoon season with reduced intensity in the later part of the season,” it stated. The forecaster had already declared in a March 29, 2019 press release that “El Nino conditions are likely to persist in the early part of the summer season and likely to weaken thereafter.” Also Read – Insider threat managementEl Nino, which is the unusual warming of the equatorial Pacific Ocean, disrupts global wind patterns affecting climatic conditions in tropical areas like Africa, sub-tropical areas like India as well as the extra-tropical areas like North America. In India, there is a relationship between El Nino events and hotter-than-usual summers along with a decrease in rainfall during the monsoon. Most of the time, these events have also led to drought conditions. In contrast to the IMD, weather agencies in other countries had declared weak El Nino conditions at the beginning of 2019. In January, Japan’s Meteorological Agency, which is also the Asian arm of the World Meteorological Organisation, said El Nino conditions were prevailing and that there was an 80 per cent chance of an El Nino phenomenon staying till spring season of 2019. The Climate Prediction Centre (CPC) of the National Weather Service in the United States of America also concluded, around the same time, that weak El Nino conditions had formed in the equatorial Pacific Ocean. In a March 14, 2019 update, the CPC says that “weak El Nino conditions are likely to continue through the Northern Hemisphere spring 2019 with an 80 per cent probability and summer with a 60 per cent probability”. (The views expressed are of Down To Earth)last_img read more

Adopt healthy lifestyle to get rid of dementia risk WHO

first_imgNew Delhi: If you think that you may be under the risk of dementia then start doing regular exercises, eating healthy diets along with staying away from the harmful use of alcohol and smoking as the World Health Organisation (WHO) in its new guidelines on dementia have stated that potential dementia patients can get rid of the disease by maintaining healthy blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar levels.While releasing the new guidelines on dementia, WHO Director-General Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus has said that in the next 30 years, the number of people with dementia is expected to triple. Also Read – 2019 most peaceful festive season for J&K: Jitendra Singh”We need to do everything we can to reduce our risk of dementia. The scientific evidence gathered for these guidelines confirm what we have suspected for some time that what is good for our heart, is also good for our brain,” Ghebreyesus said in an official press statement released by the WHO. The guidelines provide the knowledge base for health-care providers to advise patients on what they can do to help prevent cognitive decline and dementia. As per the WHO press note, the guidelines would also be useful for governments, policy-makers and planning authorities to guide them in developing policy and designing programmes that encourage healthy lifestyles. “The reduction of risk factors for dementia is one of several areas of action included in the WHO’s global action plan for the public health response to dementia,” the WHO said in its release.last_img read more

You Dont Need Sports Drinks To Stay Hydrated

Christie Aschwanden’s new book, “Good to Go: What the Athlete in All of Us Can Learn from the Strange Science of Recovery,” is available this week. In it, she examines the latest recovery trends among athletes — including Tom Brady’s infrared pajamas, Sue Bird’s coffee naps and Michael Phelps’s “cupping” ritual. She also tests some of the most controversial methods herself, including cryochambers, float tanks and infrared saunas. Below, we’re publishing an excerpt of the book’s chapter on what science really tells us about what we should drink after we work out. Hydrate Till You DrownExercise scientist and physician Tim Noakes was a believer in the dangers of dehydration until two separate experiences left him questioning what he thought he knew.First, Noakes was involved in a study examining participants in a four-day canoe race. During a particularly rough day, one of the paddlers lost all of his drinking water when it washed overboard as he went through some breakers. Despite having canoed about 50 kilometers without drinking, the paddler’s body temperature hadn’t become elevated, as the dehydration theory would have predicted. “We weighed him, and he’d lost about eight or nine pounds, but his body temperature was normal and I thought, oh my gosh — body weight loss has nothing to do with body temperature,” Noakes says. This was a lightbulb moment, because conventional wisdom held that one of the reasons that dehydration was (supposedly) so dangerous was that it put people at risk for heatstroke, and this finding contradicted that assumption.The canoe study prompted Noakes to reconsider the idea that maintaining full hydration was essential to staving off heatstroke. Then, in 1981, a runner wrote to Noakes describing a strange experience she’d had at that year’s Comrades Marathon — a famous 90-kilometer ultramarathon in South Africa. It was the first time that the event had provided drink stations every mile of the 56-mile course, he says, and the runner wrote to say that she’d begun feeling really strange about three-quarters of the way through the race. Her husband pulled her off the course and delivered her to the medics. The first responders assumed she was dehydrated and gave her two liters of intravenous fluid, after which she lost consciousness. She had a seizure on the way to the emergency room.At the hospital, doctors discovered that her blood sodium concentration was dangerously low. The ultimate diagnosis was a medical condition called “water intoxication” or hyponatremia — too little sodium in the blood. Contrary to what the medical crew at the race had assumed, the runner wasn’t dehydrated— she was overhydrated. She’d drunk so much fluid that her blood sodium had become dangerously diluted. Low blood sodium causes cells in the body to swell, and when it happens in the brain, the results can be deadly.Noakes has built a reputation as a loud contrarian on a variety of issues. He is perhaps most famous for his theories about exercise fatigue and has made a career out of pushing against conventional scientific wisdom, some say to his own detriment.5In 2017, the Health Professions Council of South Africa cleared him of a charge of professional misconduct that had been brought by the Association for Dietetics in South Africa, which had complained about advice he’d given on Twitter telling a mother to feed her baby a low-carb, high-fat diet — an eating plan that’s the subject of his latest crusade. So it’s not surprising that he was one of the first and loudest voices on overhydration (the guy wrote a whole book about it).Yet Noakes is far from alone in worrying that the rush to prevent dehydration may have put exercisers at risk of the far more serious condition of water intoxication. In 1986, a research group published a paper in the Journal of the American Medical Association describing the experience of a medical student and a physician who’d become stuporous and disoriented during an ultramarathon. The men were diagnosed with hyponatremia, and they concluded that they’d developed the condition by drinking too much.There’s never been a case of a runner dying of dehydration on a marathon course, but since 1993, at least five marathoners have died from hyponatremia they developed during a race.6This 2005 Noakes paper describes four deaths, and since then, there’s been at least one more, at the London Marathon in 2007. At the 2002 Boston Marathon, researchers from Harvard Medical School took blood samples from 488 marathoners after the finish. The samples showed that 13 percent of the runners had diagnosable hyponatremia, and three had critical cases of the condition. German researchers similarly took blood samples from more than a thousand finishers of the Ironman European Championship over multiple years and found that 10.6 percent of them had hyponatremia. Most of the instances were mild, but nearly 2 percent of the finishers had severe or critical cases. Although the findings indicate that hyponatremia is still a rare condition, what makes them especially concerning is that the early symptoms of hyponatremia are very easily confused with those of dehydration — weakness, headache, nausea, dizziness and lightheadedness.The problem with this model of hydration is that it overlooks basic physiology.How did hyponatremia become an affliction of athletes? In retrospect, it may come down to an error of shifted priorities. In the wake of Gatorade’s massive success, sports drink makers turned to science to promote their products, and researchers focused on things that were easy to measure — body temperature and sweat losses. Based on an idea that dehydration must be a risk factor for heatstroke, attention moved to replenishing fluid loss.The problem with this model of hydration is that it overlooks basic physiology. It turns out, your body is highly adapted to cope with losing multiple liters of fluid, especially during exercise. When you exercise, you lose fluid and salts through sweat, and that translates into a small change in what’s called your “plasma osmolality” — the concentration of salts and other soluble compounds in your blood. You need enough fluid and electrolytes in your blood for your cells to function properly, and this balance is tightly regulated by a feedback loop, says Kelly Anne Hyndman, a professor of medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and leading expert on kidney physiology.When you sweat, your brain senses the corresponding rise in plasma osmolality and directs the release of antidiuretic hormone (ADH), which prods the kidneys to activate aquaporins, which are like tiny straws that poke into the kidneys to draw water back into the blood. “It’s a pathway to conserve water,” Hyndman says. As your body reabsorbs water, your plasma osmolality returns to normal, your brain senses the change, and it shuts down ADH. This feedback loop is finely tuned to keep plasma osmolality in a safe range. Even a tiny drop in electrolytes will activate this system to keep your fluid balance in check. “People always worry they’re going to be dehydrated when the reality is, it’s much easier to over- hydrate because our bodies are so good at conserving water,” Hyndman says. “Being a little dehydrated is not a bad thing. Our bodies can handle it.”Athletes who develop hyponatremia during exercise usually get there by drinking too much because they’ve been conditioned to think they need to drink beyond thirst, says Tamara Hew- Butler, a professor of exercise science at Oakland University and the lead author of several papers on hyponatremia. Even if you don’t drink anything (which she does not recommend), your blood sodium levels will rise in response to sweat losses, and as a result, your body will shift fluid into the blood to maintain your fluid balance, Hew-Butler says.The same feedback loop that calls in the aquaporins also activates your thirst. “You don’t have to drink above thirst — you’ll be fine!” she says. Just as sleepiness is your body’s way of telling you that it’s time to sleep, thirst is how your body ensures that you seek fluids when you need them. No one tells you to sleep before you’re tired, and unless you’re in a situation where you can’t drink for a prolonged period, there’s no sense in drinking before you feel thirsty either. Your body is a finely tuned machine that that is capable of adapting to changing conditions, and it’s not usually necessary to try to outsmart it.You can also forget those pee charts that look like paint swatches for urine, and ignore anyone who says that yellow pee is a sign that you need to drink more water. If you think about hydration from the standpoint of what’s going on inside your body, it’s easy to see why urine hue isn’t helpful. The color of your pee is essentially just a measure of how concentrated your urine is. If it contains more waste than water, it looks dark, and if it’s mostly water, it’s light or almost clear. But that’s not what’s important. What you really want to know is what’s going on in your blood, and your urine can’t tell you that. Dark pee might mean that you’re running low on fluid, but it could also mean that your kidneys are keeping your plasma osmolality in check by conserving water. Very light or clear urine just means that you’ve drunk more water than your body needs, and that’s not necessarily a good thing, especially right before an athletic event.Because of the way the body adapts to fluid loss, the common advice to drink a lot in advance of a big event like a marathon may actually backfire. If you drink a bunch of excess water leading up to a competition, you prime your body to become less adept at holding on to precious fluids, says Mark Knepper, chief of the Epithelial Systems Biology Laboratory at the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. When you’re very hydrated, your body doesn’t need to activate many aquaporins, and over time, it reduces the number in reserve, meaning that you’ll have fewer of these water straws at the ready when you need them.Yet everywhere I look, it seems that people are telling me to drink more water. In his best- selling 2017 book, “The TB12 Method,” New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady presents his magic hydration formula — drink at least one-half of your body weight in ounces of water every day. “At 225 pounds, that means I should be drinking 112 ounces a day, minimum,” he writes. (Brady also contends that “the more hydrated I am, the less likely I am to get sunburned,” a claim disputed by scientists.) If our bodies are so good at adapting to moderate fluid loss and letting us know when we need to drink, why are there still so many messages out there urging us to drink before we feel thirsty?An obvious explanation for this is that most of what we hear about hydration comes from companies and researchers with a vested interest in making it all seem complex and highly scientific. The current guidelines from the ACSM and the National Athletic Trainers’ Association have been updated to warn about hyponatremia, but they still promote the ideas that thirst is a poor indicator of hydration and that more than a 2 percent body weight loss should be avoided. The ACSM, NSCA and NATA all receive funding from sports drink makers, as do some of their members. If staying hydrated were as simple as just drinking to thirst, you wouldn’t need expert advice or scientifically formulated products like Gatorade.From a biological perspective, it’s hard to imagine that the human body is so delicate that it can’t function properly without scientists (or football stars) swooping in with calculators to tell us how to keep it running properly. “You have to trust your body,” Knepper says. Humans have evolved to survive exercising without chugging water or sports drink on some rigid schedule. “You get clues about what you need if you listen to your own body,” he says. “You don’t have to know chemistry to survive.”After examining the science, I can’t help thinking we’ve made hydration unduly complicated. I take my dog running with me most of the time, and I’ve never measured the color of her pee or forced her to drink (as if I could). I make sure she has regular access to water, but she doesn’t always take it. At times, she won’t drink at all during a long run, and on those occasions, she always goes straight to her water dish when we get home and slurps until she’s satisfied. I’ve never had to give her an emergency IV for low fluid levels. If drinking to thirst is good enough for her, it’s probably good enough for me too. CLARA KIRKPATRICK The Limited Science Behind Hydration AdviceSports doctors were also urging athletes to drink. The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), a professional organization of sports science experts (which receives financial support from Gatorade), put out a consensus statement in 1996 recommending that “during exercise, athletes should start drinking early and at regular intervals in an attempt to consume fluids at a rate sufficient to replace all the water lost through sweating (i.e., body weight loss), or consume the maximal amount that can be tolerated.” The message coming from experts was that athletes needed to replace the fluids they lost during exercise lest their performance and health suffer.In the wake of all this promotion, sports drinks have become a multimillion-dollar business. But when a team of medical researchers trained in the evaluation of scientific findings had a look at the research underpinning the boom in sports drinks, they reached a startling conclusion. “As it turns out, if you apply evidence-based methods, 40 years of sports drinks research does not seemingly add up to much,” Carl Heneghan and his colleagues at the University of Oxford’s Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine wrote in a 2012 analysis published in the British medical journal BMJ. When Heneghan’s team gathered and examined all of the available evidence on sports drinks (it even consulted sports drink manufacturers to ask them for their supporting studies, though not all complied), they found what amounted to a bunch of preliminary or inconclusive evidence packaged as more definitive proof.The first, almost universal, problem among these studies was that they were too small to produce meaningful results. “Small studies are known to be systematically biased toward the effectiveness of the interventions they are testing,” Heneghan and his colleagues wrote. Out of the 106 studies they analyzed, only one had more than 100 subjects, and the second-largest study used only 53 people. The median sample size? Nine.“Worryingly, most performance tests used to assess sports drinks have never been validated.”Another common shortcoming was that the studies were often designed in a way that almost assured that they’d find a benefit from sports drinks. Deborah Cohen, an investigations editor at the BMJ who was involved in the project and wrote a summary of the findings, recalls a study in which volunteers who fasted overnight were divided into two groups, one whose members were given a sports drink containing water, salts and sugar and another whose members received water. “People who were given the sports drink fared better,” she says. “Well, no shit.” If you haven’t had any food in 12 hours and then you get a bit of sugar, of course you’ll perform better than the people still running on empty. But to say that this means the sports drink is superior to whatever a normal person would consume leading up to or during exercise just isn’t generalizable, she says. “Who starves themselves overnight and then goes to perform some exercise?” And yet the BMJ investigation found that this type of study design is surprisingly common among tests of nutritional products.Some of the dazzling powers that sports drinks display in the studies touted by their makers may be nothing more than the placebo effect. When people volunteer for a study to test a new sports drink, they come to it with an expectation that the product will have some performance benefit. Studies use a placebo group to factor out such effects, but a placebo only controls for these expectations when it’s indistinguishable from the real deal. So it’s telling, Cohen says, that studies using plain water for the control group found that the sports drink had positive effects, while the ones that used taste-matched placebos didn’t.The BMJ analysis also concluded that many of the measures made in these studies may not matter for real-world performance. “Worryingly, most performance tests used to assess sports drinks have never been validated,” Heneghan and his colleagues write, and some of them are known to produce highly variable results that may not be reproducible.Heneghan and his team concluded that claims about sports drinks rely on small studies with comparison groups that favor the products being studied, a lack of rigorous blinding so that participants were likely nudged to perform better while taking in the sports drinks, and measurements of effectiveness that might not be meaningful in real life. Add to that statistical sleights of hand that inflate the benefits of the drinks (for instance, one study increased the benefit of carbohydrate drinks from 3 percent to 33 percent by excluding a segment of the test from the analysis), and sports drinks don’t come out looking so impressive.When Heneghan’s and Cohen’s reports came out, some sports science experts blasted it as unnecessarily rigid, because they set their standards based on the conventions of clinical medicine rather than sports science, where, for instance, small sample sizes are common. Which standards and methods should be used for assessing evidence is an important debate that is gaining attention within the sports science community. In the meantime, the emphasis on hydration has created another problem to address. In the early 1990s, Gatorade ran a television commercial featuring Michael Jordan called “Be Like Mike.” It featured slam dunks by Jordan interspersed with footage of kids shooting hoops and, of course, Jordan and other happy people drinking Gatorade.Stuart Phillips remembers that ad campaign well. As an aspiring athlete, he, too, wanted to be like Mike. “Michael Jordan drank Gatorade, so I drank Gatorade,” Phillips says. Despite guzzling the sports drink, Phillips never did make it to the pros, but instead grew up to become the director of the Centre for Nutrition, Exercise, and Health Research at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. The Jordan ad taught him a lesson about the power of marketing, though: “If you can get an endorsement from an athlete that everybody recognizes, then who needs science?”Scientific facts don’t sell products; stories do. Jordan was already a basketball superstar by the time Gatorade came calling, and the public was eager to experience something of his greatness. Enter Gatorade — Michael Jordan drank it, and young Stuart Phillips could too. To drink Gatorade wasn’t just to mimic a sports hero, it was to imagine a causal relationship — Jordan drank Gatorade and then made all those slam dunks, so the one must have had something to do with the other.Psychologists call such thinking the “illusion of causality,” and it’s so powerful that it has spawned an entire genre of advertising — the celebrity endorsement. No one would care that a pro athlete uses a particular product if it didn’t somehow appear that the item played some role in that star’s success. The Irish have a saying, “An umbrella accompanies the rain but rarely causes it.” The same could be said of product endorsements and athletic greatness. Still, our minds are quick to connect the dots in the wrong direction.The age of the athlete-endorsed sports drink began on a Florida football field in the mid-1960s. Back then, most coaches and athletes didn’t give much thought to fluid replacement during practice or competition. In some instances, athletes were even counseled to avoid drinking close to a workout lest they upset their stomach. But in 1965, a University of Florida football coach came to Dr. Robert Cade and his team of university doctors1There are conflicting accounts of exactly what question sparked the research that led to Gatorade and who it was that asked. An official history published on the Cade Museum for Creativity & Invention’s website says that “Gatorade was the result of an offhand question posed in 1965 by former University of Florida linebacker Dwayne Douglas to Dr. J Robert Cade, a professor of renal medicine. ‘Why don’t football players ever urinate during a game?’” According to a history of Gatorade published on the company’s website in 2017, “In early summer of 1965, a University of Florida assistant coach sat down with a team of university physicians and asked them to determine why so many of his players were being affected by heat and heat related illnesses.” Both sources say that the researchers involved in developing the drink were Dr. Robert Cade, Dr. Dana Shires, Dr. H. James Free and Dr. Alejandro de Quesada. complaining that his players were “wilting” in the heat. (He also wondered why his players never urinated during games.) After some investigation, Cade and his colleagues concluded that two factors were causing the players to fall victim to the heat — they weren’t replenishing the fluids and salts they were sweating out, nor were they restoring the carbohydrates their bodies were burning for fuel.In a stroke of genius, Gatorade turned the drink’s sodium, phosphorus and potassium into “electrolytes,” which is simply the scientific term for molecules that produce ions when dissolved in water.Cade figured that he could solve the problem by helping players replace those lost resources, so he stirred together some sodium, sugar and monopotassium phosphate with water to create a drink soon dubbed Gatorade, after the University of Florida’s nickname: the Gators. Legend has it, the drink turned the struggling Gators football team around. It finished the season with a winning record, and in 1967, the team won the Orange Bowl for the first time in school history. Other teams took notice of the newfangled beverage, and in 1967, Cade and the University of Florida signed an agreement with canned goods company Stokely-Van Camp to produce Gatorade commercially.2This history is outlined in Darren Rovell’s book, “First in Thirst: How Gatorade Turned the Science of Sweat into a Cultural Phenomenon.” Orders for the drink poured in.What followed was a national campaign to sell the public on the idea that exercise caused dehydration, the cure was Gatorade’s specially developed drink, and this tonic was critical for sports performance — it was created by a doctor and tested in studies, after all. One of the brand’s early print advertisements boasted that Gatorade was absorbed 12 times faster than water (a claim walked back in 1970,3According to Darren Rovell’s book, “First in Thirst: How Gatorade Turned the Science of Sweat into a Cultural Phenomenon.”. after Ohio State team doctor Robert J. Murphy challenged it at a meeting of the American Medical Association).In a stroke of genius, Gatorade turned the drink’s sodium, phosphorus and potassium into a special selling point by rebranding these ordinary salts with their scientific name — “electrolytes,” which is simply the scientific term for molecules that produce ions when dissolved in water. Your body maintains some reserves of these vital ions that it can tap into as needed to keep your body’s fluid and salt balance in check. We do lose electrolytes through sweat, but even when you exercise continuously for many hours, you will simply correct any losses via your normal appetite and hunger mechanisms. (You’ve already experienced this if you’ve ever had a hankering for a salty snack.) One small study of cyclists and triathletes found that it didn’t really matter whether they drank plain water, a sports drink or a milk-based beverage after an hour of hard exercise. As long as they drank some liquids along with a meal, they restored their fluid levels just fine.Gatorade may not have been the first to use this term, but they’re the ones that landed electrolytes in the public lexicon. In 1985, the Gatorade Sports Science Institute was founded to promote the study of hydration and nutrition for athletes, research that also happened to make for great marketing. Conveniently, the studies that came from the GSSI could be used to support the product’s claims. A 1990 magazine ad read: “We test Gatorade in laboratories. We test it at major universities, with sports science experts, on sophisticated scientific equipment with names that are longer than this sentence. What does it prove? Gatorade works.”4According to Darren Rovell’s book, “First in Thirst: How Gatorade Turned the Science of Sweat into a Cultural Phenomenon.”Rovell’s book.Early advertisements presented thirst as the problem that Gatorade was designed to solve, but as the GSSI’s research program progressed, the emphasis moved to a more clinical concept of hydration and the notion that thirst was not a good indicator of whether an exerciser was drinking enough. “Unfortunately, there is no clear physiological signal that dehydration is occurring, and most athletes are oblivious to the subtle effects of dehydration (thirst, growing fatigue, irritability, inability to mentally focus, hyperthermia),” wrote GSSI co-founder Bob Murray in one report. Instead, athletes were advised to drink according to scientific formulas. A Gatorade ad that ran in Northwest Runner in 2001 depicted the glistening torso of a runner with the race number 40 pinned to her shorts and the words, “Research shows your body needs at least 40 oz. of fluid every hour or your performance could suffer.” That’s the equivalent of five 8-ounce glasses of liquid, which means that a runner finishing a marathon in a fast three hours would need to drink 15 glasses of fluid along the way. Gulp.Gatorade wasn’t alone in promoting the benefits of drinking before, during and after exercise. Other sports drink manufacturers, such as the drug company GlaxoSmithKline (Lucozade Sport), also pointed to science when marketing its products. Lucozade, for example, established a “sports science academy” to promote its drink. Together, these campaigns fostered the idea that exercise depletes your fluids and electrolytes (which, remember, is just a fancy name for salts) and that special measures are required to make things right again.It was no longer sufficient to simply drink some water and eat a meal after exercising. The idea these marketing campaigns fostered was that physical activity created extraordinary nutritional needs and that these specially formulated beverages were the best way to meet them. This was science speaking. Reprinted from “GOOD TO GO: What the Athlete in All of Us Can Learn from the Strange Science of Recovery” by Christie Aschwanden. Copyright © 2019 by Christie Aschwanden. With permission of the publisher, W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. All rights reserved. read more

CANADIAN GOVERNMENT ADDS CARICOM NATIONS TO WATCH LIST

first_img MORE THAN PREGNANT WOMEN need to be concerned about Zika Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Airliners spraying for Zika prevention; Zika impacting tourism arrivals Condom use now recommended as a prevention to Zika; sexually transmitted case found in Dallas Related Items:Canadian government issues watch list, CARICOM nations added to Canadian watch list, zika virus Recommended for you Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppCARICOM Nations are now added to a watch list issued by the Canadian Government and that includes the Turks and Caicos; again this stems from the outbreak of the mosquito borne and sexually transmitted Zika Virus.  The Bahamas, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, St Lucia and Trinidad and Tobago are among the CARICOM member states named; the Turks and Caicos is named in a separate notice from Public Health Agency of Canada where pregnant women and those considering pregnancy are told they should avoid travel to the Turks and Caicos, among others.  While Zika and its threats are causing serious health concern within these territories for its residents, the Zika Virus is also a major blow to travel to the region.  In a PBS News Hour article, the Caribbean Tourism Organization or CTO, Secretary General, Hugh Riley is quoted saying what worries him more than the cancellations is the missed business, ‘That is the unknown number of people who may opt out of booking travel to the Caribbean altogether.”CARPHA Executive Director, Dr. James Hospedales is also quoted in the piece from February with, “We’re very concerned about it. And it’s hard to avoid the media amplification, even a 2-to-3 percent decline in tourism is a huge blow, especially for countries that are already in debt or whose economies are struggling.” The article also shared some statistics on the region:  ‘The Caribbean is one of the most tourism-dependent regions in the world, it says. Comprised of more than 700 islands spanning 30 territories, the West Indies sees more than 25 million visitors annually and the U.S. is its No. 1 source. About 15 million Americans visit the Caribbean for vacation every year, contributing nearly $50 billion toward the region’s overall GDP.’According to the Caribbean Public Health Agency or CARPHA, 45 Caribbean and Latin American countries are now reporting Zika.  As of August 30, the CARICOM countries were cited in the Canadian travel notice.last_img read more

Violence trumps peaceful resolution causing Bahamas high murder rate

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, October 18, 2017 – Nassau – Unresolved conflicts are the motives for the spate of murders in the country and Police are urging citizens and residents to settle arguments amicably.   Police, in a media release yesterday, cautioned that there are better ways to resolve disputes and their suggestions involve adding a calm, trusted and experienced counselor to the mix.Talking to Pastors, or private counselors was recommended as a way to avoid the violence.#MagneticMediaNews#stoptheviolence#unresolvedconflictsmotivatesviolence Related Items:#magneticmedianews, #stoptheviolence, #unresolvedconflictsmotivatesviolence Recommended for you Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppcenter_img Improved youth programs, more Police presence and encouragement to ‘walk away’ from TCI House members 15 year old boy shot dead, Bahamas Christian Council says country needs crime solutionlast_img read more

Defense Spending to Hit 700B in FY18 FY19 Under Senate Deal

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR Defense spending in fiscal 2018 and 2019 would reach levels embraced by Defense Secretary Jim Mattis as well as the chairmen of the House and Senate Armed Services committees, under the bipartisan budget deal announced by Senate leaders Wednesday. The agreement would raise the statutory caps on defense spending by $80 billion in FY 2018 and $85 billion the following year, pushing DOD’s base budget well past the $600 billion mark. When funds allocated to the department’s overseas contingency operations account, which are not subject to the Budget Control Act caps, are included, total defense spending is expected to be $700 billion in FY 2018 and $716 billion in FY 2019, reported Defense News.The Senate agreement would roughly match the spending called for in the FY 2018 defense authorization bill, while the topline figure for FY 2019 would match the Trump administration’s new budget request scheduled to be released next week. Last week Mattis told reporters he would be “very happy with” funding at those levels, reported CQ. During testimony before the House Armed Services Committee Tuesday, he called for those exact figures. And on Wednesday, Mattis voiced support for the deal during remarks at the White House made right after the Senate agreement was announced.In a joint statement, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Rep. Mac Thornberry (R-Texas), chairmen of the Senate and House Armed Services committees, praised the funding levels in Wednesday’s agreement as well.last_img read more

Rupee Plunges To New Low Of 5587 Amid RBI Intervention

first_imgThe rupee plunged to a new low of 55.87 in the early Wednesday trade, marking its sixth consecutive record low against the US dollar.The new low spurred the Reserve Bank of India to intervene, with the central bank selling dollars starting from the 55.75 rupee level, traders said according to media reports.RBI intervention during Wednesday’s trading session pushed the rupee to 55.52 but dropped to 55.87 later, NDTV said. Tuesday’s trade saw the rupee closing at 55.39/40 to the dollar.  The currency’s progressive fall in the past couple of days has drawn attention from the government, with Finance Minister Pranab Mukherjee saying on Tuesday that the centre is keeping a close watch on the situation and that necessary measures are taken to tackle the rupee’s impact on the foreign exchange market.”Global slowdown due to unfolding of eurozone sovereign debt crisis has, inter-alia, impacted the Indian economy through deceleration in exports, widening of trade and current account deficit, decline in capital flows, fall in the value of Indian Rupee, stock market decline and lower economic growth,” Mukherjee told the Rajya Sabha.Mukherjee assured that the RBI is intervening in the Forex market to help curb volatility.”Raising of NRI deposit interest rates, easing availability of export credit and stipulation that 50% of balances in the Exchange Earner’s Foreign Currency Account be converted into rupees balances”, are some of the measures being adopted by the central bank, he said.The finance minister also added that the centre is working towards boosting India’s infrastructure sector by increasing direct foreign investment. Other steps include “liberalization of external commercial borrowings (ECB) policy and portfolio investment norms besides steps to improve access to corporate bond market through Infrastructure Debt Funds.””A number of legislative measures/amendments have also been taken for fiscal consolidation/reforms and financial sector reforms”, Mukherjee noted.last_img read more

Delhi to host dialogue on geopolitics

first_imgThe fourth Raisina Dialogue highlighting geopolitics, geo-economics will be held in Delhi in January. Photo: UNBIndia on Friday announced the fourth edition of the Raisina Dialogue will be held in New Delhi between 8 and 10 January next year.This is India’s flagship conference which highlights geopolitics and geo-economics.Observer Research Foundation (ORF) in collaboration with the external affairs ministry of India will host the dialogue, reports UNB.The Raisina Dialogue is designed around multiple formats, including a ‘Young Fellows’ programme, ministerial sessions, plenaries, debates and roundtables, said an official announcement.The 2018 iteration of the Raisina Dialogue covered over 60 different themes, and attracted nearly 600 speakers and delegates from 86 countries.It was jointly inaugurated by Indian prime minister Narendra Modi, and his Israeli counterpart Benjamin Netanyahu.The dialogue hosted high-level delegations from several countries including Australia, Russia, US, Singapore, Indonesia, Iran, France, Sweden, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Mauritius, Japan and Poland.In addition to Indian ministers, secretaries and chiefs of army, navy and air force, key international speakers including Bangladesh’s foreign minister AH Mahmood Ali attended it.last_img read more

French security forces kill one in Paris airport

first_imgSecurity forces at Paris’ Orly airport on Saturday shot dead a man who took a weapon from a soldier, the interior ministry said, adding that nobody was hurt in the incident.Witnesses said the airport was evacuated following the shooting at around 8:30am (0730GMT).”A man took a weapon from a soldier then hid in a shop in the airport before being shot dead by security forces,” an interior ministry spokesman told AFP.He said no one was wounded in the incident.Interior Minister Bruno Le Roux is due to visit the facility, which is in Paris’ southern outskirts, the spokesman added.”We had queued up to check in for the Tel Aviv flight when we heard three or four shots nearby,” witness Franck Lecam said.”The whole airport has been evacuated,” the 54-year-old said, confirming what an airport worker, speaking on condition of anonymity, had said earlier.”We are all outside the airport, about 200 metres from the entrance,” Lecam said.”There are policemen, emergency workers and soldiers everywhere in all directions. A security official told us that it happened near gates 37-38 where Turkish Airlines flights were scheduled.”last_img read more

Young girl set on fire

first_imghe main entrance of Dhaka Medical College Hospital. File PhotoA young girl suffered serious burn injuries as miscreants allegedly set her on fire in Birpur of Narsingdi town on Thursday night.The victim is 17-year-old Phulon Barman, reports UNB.Salauddin Ahmed, officer-in-charge (investigation) of Narsingdi Model police station, said Phulon went to a grocery shop for a small purchase around 8:45pm.While returning to home, two miscreants waylaid the girl and took her to an abandoned place and set the girl on fire after pouring kerosene over her body.Hearing her screams, local people rushed in and took her to sadar hospital. She was then moved to the burn unit of Dhaka Medical College Hospital as her condition deteriorated.last_img read more

Enemies All Around Me

first_imgBy Sean Yoes, Baltimore AFRO Editor, syoes@afro.com“Enemies all around meOne mistake and they’ll down me…I said the enemies all around youOne mistake and they’ll down you”-Ghostface Killah (“Enemies All Around Me”)Fred Hampton, the revolutionary chairman of the Illinois chapter of the Black Panther Party would have been 70-years-old on Aug. 30 if he were still alive.Fred Hampton (Courtesy Photo)Hampton and Mark Clark, his colleague with the Panthers, were brutally murdered in Chicago by a cowardly mélange of a tactical unit operating under the auspices of the Cook County, Illinois State’s Attorney’s Office, the Chicago Police Department and the FBI. Hampton’s bedroom was riddled with bullets as he slept next to his pregnant girlfriend and later he was shot twice in the head at point blank range.In 1970, the coroner ruled the deaths of Clark and Hampton “justifiable homicides,” although in 1982, survivors and relatives of Clark and Hampton were paid $1.85 million by the City of Chicago, Cook County and the federal government in a civil lawsuit.Many chroniclers of the Black American liberation movement argue Hampton and Clark, and so many others, were ultimately victims of the effort known as COINTELPRO (Counterintelligence Program), a series of covert, often illegal operations, conducted by J. Edgar Hoover’s FBI, to disrupt and decimate groups Hoover deemed a threat. COINTELPRO “officially” operated between 1956 and 1971. In 1969, it focused on the Black Panther Party and specifically, the charismatic Hampton, who worked to augment the ranks and influence of the BPP by crafting an alliance between his group and a Southside Chicago street gang with thousands of members, which would have doubled the size of the national Black Panther Party.Simultaneously, Hampton led efforts to unite Black, White and Hispanic community organizers, a prospect which scared the hell out of Hoover and his milieu and compelled them to destroy the Panthers.Baltimore’s Marshall “Eddie” Conway, another iconic figure of the Black Panther Party and Black liberation movement, was also a victim of COINTELPRO. In 1971, Conway was convicted in the murder of a Baltimore police officer in a dubious trial. Conway consistently maintained his innocence, yet he was jailed for decades until he was released on parole in 2014, after an appellate court ruled his jury was given improper instructions.Thank God we still have him with us. Conway today works for the Real News Network here in Baltimore.As we honor the legacy and the work of Hampton, Conway and other soldiers in the Black liberation movement, in 2018, members of Baltimore’s Black advocacy community should heed the lessons derived from their plight.The night Hampton was murdered he was drugged with a sleep agent by William O’Neal, a member of the BPP turned FBI informant.According to a report by the Chicago Reader posted in January 1990, O’Neal, who was in charge of Hampton’s security and held keys to Panthers’ headquarters and safe houses,  provided the FBI the floor plan to Hampton’s apartment where he and Clark were ultimately murdered. After his cover was blown, O’Neal, fled to California under the alias of William Hart and entered the federal witness program.He secretly returned to Chicago in 1984, but eventually committed suicide on MLK Day 1990.The point is, the specter of COINTELPRO, if not the official government apparatus is very real in the minds of some within Baltimore’s Black advocacy community; the tactics of murder and mayhem wielded in the 1960’s and 1970’s have been eschewed by infinitely more subtle tools. In 2018, we have witnessed the emergence of shadowy online groups, who hurl anonymous accusations and attacks. Those who question their motives or their identities are tarred and feathered on social media, or worse.Ultimately, the result is the same, chaos and confusion sown within groups that are doing work in Baltimore that has prevented the city from being torn asunder at one of the most precarious times in Baltimore’s history. Individuals who have worked on behalf of disenfranchised communities have been ostracized an accused of protecting bullies and criminals, by digital hobgoblins.The message to the city’s Black advocacy and activist community is simple; stop flailing and focus, every Brother ain’t a Brother and every Sister ain’t a Sister.“Enemies all around meOne mistake and they’ll down me…I said the enemies all around youSean Yoes (Courtesy Photo)One mistake and they’ll down you”Sean Yoes is the Baltimore Editor of the AFRO and author of Baltimore After Freddie Gray: Real Stories From One of America’s Great Imperiled Cities.last_img read more

ProteinNanoparticle Material Mimics Human Brain Tissue

first_imgA composite material consisting of a horse protein and metallic nanoparticles displays magnetic properties very similar to those of human brain tissue, scientists have found. The work, published in the June 20 online edition of Physical Review B, may help lead to a more thorough understanding of the magnetic behavior of brain tissue and other complex natural materials. Studying the magnetism of many natural substances, such as rocks, soils, and biological materials, can be difficult because they tend to be a mix of several magnetic components. This means that valuable structural and functional information, which can be obtained from a material’s magnetic properties, is often left undiscovered.“It can be very difficult to separate the different components to study them individually,” said the study’s lead scientist, geophysicist Ann Hirt, to PhysOrg.com. Hirt is a researcher at the Institute of Geophysics in Zurich, Switzerland. “Often, the use of several analysis methods is necessary and, even then, definite conclusions are seldom. Finding and investigating model materials may help remedy this problem.”As a first step, Hirt and her team identified the different components in the brain that produce magnetic signals. They used various magnetic methods, which are normally used to identify magnetic minerals in rocks. They found that the brain tissue, in which the other components are embedded, contributes the strongest magnetic signal, followed by iron in the blood of the brain. Next is ferritin, an iron-carrying protein found in nanoparticle form. Recently, a fourth component was discovered, but its identity has eluded scientists. It is either the iron-oxygen compound magnetite or a very similar compound, maghemite — or perhaps even a blend of the two. Magnetite and maghemite have such similar magnetic properties that distinguishing between them is very difficult.“Although the signal from the tissue itself was very strong, we could easily subtract it from the total magnetization,” said Franziska Brem, another Institute of Geophysics scientist geophysicist on the team. “The remaining signal appeared to be a combination of the signals from ferritin and magnetite.”To confirm this, the group measured the magnetic properties of a model system for which they knew the exact content and that they could study with certainty: a mixture of horse-spleen ferritin and protein-coated magnetite nanoparticles. The results show a striking similarity to the measurements for actual brain tissue.“Based on these measurements, we can assume that the ferritin and magnetite/maghemite behavior in brain tissue is very close to that of our model material,” Brem said.By Laura Mgrdichian, Copyright 2006 PhysOrg.com Researchers use magnetically actuated microrobots to deliver stem cells to tissue targets Explore furthercenter_img Citation: Protein-Nanoparticle Material Mimics Human Brain Tissue (2006, July 21) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2006-07-protein-nanoparticle-material-mimics-human-brain.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Empowering women to rewrite social norms

first_imgMedha Mukherjee, a young entrepreneur started feministaa.com, with the aim to provide a platform to women and address their issues. She started the project four years back and hasn’t looked back since then. When asked how and why she became an entrepreneur, Medha said, “Entrepreneurial hunger is a desire to change something and create an impact. That craze for changing something will drag you to build anything that drives that change.””A friend and I opened a lemonade shop in our neighborhood when we were just 12. At that point, we were just filling up a need gap in the market. But concurrently the entrepreneur in me was born. Although I worked in a multinational for short time, I was longing to start something of my own,” she added. Why feministaa.com? She replied, “I saw women in my family and around not doing enough to realise their full potential. Their minds were stymied by the pressures of a patriarchal society. As a result, they were conditioned to look for different excuses. But when they saw women from their generation doing well, it started creating a positive impact on them.” Medha, who initially started it as a blog, decided to launch a full-fledged website after she was introduced to ‘word press’. She began to write about all kinds of women and their lives. “Soon I found that my audience wanted to read about women who were achievers, as it inspired them. So I started communicating with famous and successful women; it could be professionals, authors, actors, requesting them to mentor my readers,” mentioned the young entrepreneur. Talking about the challenges she faced during the journey, Medha replied with an example, “The impact of patriarchal superiority was so strong that when I went to Bangalore to pitch for my first investment, I was asked ‘who handles your team’. They couldn’t believe that I, a woman could manage a team.” She always felt the need for a media platform for women and hence decided to work on this project. Now, they will be holding their first event in March in Mumbai, in association with ‘coworks’– a platform which facilitates startups. Medha is happy that finally there is no stopping, funds have come and the website has started making small money too. A known name among young entrepreneur, Medha believes that as long as the purpose for what you are working for is sorted, it is easier to work for yourself than for someone else.last_img read more

Net Neutrality a Big Step Nearer as Congress Republicans Concede Fight

first_img This story originally appeared on Fortune Magazine 2 min read Senior Republicans late Tuesday signalled they had would give in to President Obama’s plans for ‘net neutrality’, paving the way for the provision of internet services to be regulated for the first time like a public utility.The New York Times reported South Dakota Senator John Thune as admitting that there was little prospect of getting Congress to overturn a ruling by the Federal Communications Commission on Thursday that is likely to bar companies from offering faster Internet connections at premium rates.“We’re not going to get a signed bill that doesn’t have Democrats’ support,” the NYT quoted Thune, who is also chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee, as saying. “This is an issue that needs to have bipartisan support.”The FCC’s five Commissioners are split on the issue, with three Democrats led by chairman Tom Wheeler all likely to vote in favor of enforcing ‘net neutrality’, while the two Republican commissioners oppose it.However, the ruling is likely to be vigorously contested by a broad swathe of companies from Comcast Corp. to IBM Corp. and Verizon Communications Inc. that have lobbied heavily for freedom to price their services as they see fit and argued that tighter regulation will deter investment in building out broadband internet across the country.Many have seen the initiative as a landmark expansion of central government’s regulatory agenda, which advocates have justified by stressing the need to prevent oligopolistic control of a service which has flourished over the last two decades, not least, because of its openness. How Success Happens February 25, 2015 Hear from Polar Explorers, ultra marathoners, authors, artists and a range of other unique personalities to better understand the traits that make excellence possible. Listen Nowlast_img read more

Recap Two lanes shut due to accident on M6 in Cheshire

first_imgUPDATE: All lanes have now reopened An accident is causing delays on the M6 motorway in Cheshire this evening. Two lanes are closed and traffic is queuing due to an accident on the Northbound carriageway at J18 A54 Middlewich Road (Middlewich / Holmes Chapel). Lanes one and two (of three) are closed, according to traffic data company Inrix and police are understood to be at the scene. A Highways England spokesman said: “A road traffic collision has closed 2 lanes on the M6 in Cheshire northbound within J18. Delays are building. North West Motorway are currently on scene. Take care on approach.” We’ll bring you live updates as we get them on the feed below. For the latest news and breaking news visit www.stokeontrentlive.co.uk Read MoreSearch for missing midwife Samantha Eastwood enters eighth day as ex-fiance appeals for safe return Get all the big headlines, pictures, analysis, opinion and video on the stories that matter to you. Follow us on Twitter @SOTLive – the official Sentinel account – real news in real time. We’re also on Facebook – your must-see news, features, videos and pictures throughout Stoke-on-Trent, North Staffordshire & South Cheshire. You’ll also find us on Instagram here .last_img read more

Author to discuss scientists views on race at Baker Institute lecture

first_imgLong Description The lecture will begin at 6 p.m. in Baker Hall’s Doré Commons.In the book, Morning explores different conceptions of race and the ways scientists are influencing ideas about race through teaching and textbooks — even as the scientific community debates the issue. For example, Morning finds that while many sociologists now assume race is a social invention or “construct,” anthropologists and biologists are far from such a consensus. She also examines how corporations and the government use scientific research in ways that often reinforce the idea that race is biologically determined.Morning will be available to sign her book after the lecture, and copies will be available for purchase.The event is sponsored by the Baker Institute’s Science and Technology Policy Program, Race Scholars at Rice of the Kinder Institute for Urban Research and the Department of Sociology. Rice faculty, staff and students who want to attend must RSVP by email (bipprsvp@rice.edu), by fax (713-348-5993) or on the Web at www.bakerinstitute.org/events/the-nature-of-race-how-scientists-think-and-teach-about-human-difference. A webcast of the event can also be seen at this address. AddThis ANN MORNING ShareAuthor to discuss scientists’ views on race at Baker Institute lectureFROM RICE NEWS STAFF REPORTSAnn Morning, an associate professor of sociology at New York University, will discuss her book, “The Nature of Race: How Scientists Think and Teach About Human Difference,” Sept. 15 at the James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy.last_img read more