Radiothon aids hospital campaign

Norfolk General Hospital is using the radio waves to raise money to help radiologists and patients.The hospital will be holding its Year of the Cat 2.0 Radiothon on both of Norfolk’s radio station on May 7.The money raised from the event will be put towards purchasing a new computed tomography scanner. The CT scanner is the most important piece of technology in the hospital to help with diagnosing a wide variety of conditions by helping to see inside the body painlessly.The CT scanner the hospital is currently using went into service in 2006. With around 8,000 scans every year, the 13-year-old machine is no longer up for the job. By the end of 2019 the manufacturer will no longer support the 2006 version of the machine.The new unit that the hospital plans on purchasing costs $1.5 million. It will produce a sharper, easier to read image, and will work faster to reduce radiation exposure.“We invite listeners to call in during the broadcast with their donation,” Jennifer White, director of the NGH Foundation, said in a press release. “Adding your voice will definitely make a difference in the delivery and maintaining of great healthcare close to home.”The day long broadcast will feature interviews with doctors, nurses, hospital staff, and patients who share their stories. More than $1 million has been raised through previous Radiothon broadcasts.Listeners can tune in to either Norfolk radio station (98.9 and 99.7) on May 7 to listen in and make a pledge.

Norfolk General Hospital is using the radio waves to raise money to help radiologists and patients.The hospital will be holding its Year of the Cat 2.0 Radiothon on both of Norfolk’s radio station on May 7.The money raised from the event will be put towards purchasing a new computed tomography scanner. The CT scanner is the most important piece of technology in the hospital to help with diagnosing a wide variety of conditions by helping to see inside the body painlessly.The CT scanner the hospital is currently using went into service in 2006. With around 8,000 scans every year, the 13-year-old machine is no longer up for the job. By the end of 2019 the manufacturer will no longer support the 2006 version of the machine.The new unit that the hospital plans on purchasing costs $1.5 million. It will produce a sharper, easier to read image, and will work faster to reduce radiation exposure.“We invite listeners to call in during the broadcast with their donation,” Jennifer White, director of the NGH Foundation, said in a press release. “Adding your voice will definitely make a difference in the delivery and maintaining of great healthcare close to home.”The day long broadcast will feature interviews with doctors, nurses, hospital staff, and patients who share their stories. More than $1 million has been raised through previous Radiothon broadcasts.Listeners can tune in to either Norfolk radio station (98.9 and 99.7) on May 7 to listen in and make a pledge.

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