The Gifted Season 2 Ep 8 Recap The Season Makes Good on

first_imgThe Gifted Season 2 Episode 7 RecapThe Gifted Season 2 Episode 6 RecapThe Gifted Season 2 Episode 5 Recap Stay on target ‘The Gifted’ S2 Finale Recap: Death, Destruction & Hope for Season 3’The Gifted’ Season 2, Ep 5 Recap: The Reunion We’ve Waited For center_img We’ve reached the halfway point of Season Two of The Gifted, and things are just now starting to kick into gear. Much of the first half of this season now feels like the show setting up the world of last night’s episode. We met a new faction in the Morlocks, which I’m positive are going to be even more important in the season’s second half. We got to know The Purifiers, and while they don’t have a huge presence in this episode, their influence ominously hangs over each scene. The Mutant Underground has been pushed even further apart, and even the inner circle is in disarray. The situation feels dire for mutants of all stripes, which makes for some captivating TV.To no one’s surprise, everything went real bad after Rebecca slaughtered everyone in the bank at the end of the last episode. It’s a Purifier’s paradise out there. Humans are attacking mutants, and riots and fires are breaking out all over the city. There’s one particularly horrifying event we’re only shown: A group of human supremacists set fire to a foster home. It’s unclear if any of the kids living there survived. Over the course of the episode, we see each character react to the news. It’s an effective way to make us feel their fear. We all know the feeling of watching the news and seeing something horrible happening in your own country, and feeling completely helpless to do anything about it. Through that lens, we can immediately understand their actions.Emma Dumont and Skyler Samuels (Photo Credit: Annette Brown/FOX)For Lorna, that means getting her baby as far away from the Inner Circle as possible. After Rebecca slaughtered a room full of (mostly) innocent people and ran off on her own, Lorna’s convinced the Inner Circle can’t protect her baby. Especially with the world growing less stable by the minute. This isn’t what Reeva promised her at the beginning of the season. For her, this episode is all about coming to terms with who her father was and why he wasn’t around as she grew up. The show still never says the name “Magneto,” and it feels more awkward here than ever before. Especially since it’s painfully clear who their talking about, what with him leading the “brotherhood” that’s on the news and sending Lorna a metal disc that looks exactly like his iconic helmet when she was a teenager.This episode goes in a different direction when it comes to the flashbacks. Usually, The Gifted opens with one that introduces the general themes of the episode, and most of the time never mentions them again. Here, we got multiple flashbacks throughout the episode to different points in Lorna’s life. We see her as an angry teenager, rejecting the only birthday message she ever got from her father, while keeping the gift itself. We see her as a young adult who gets arrested after flipping over a car belonging to a guy who wouldn’t leave her alone at a bar. Her foster mother gets her out of jail a little too easily, which certainly raises her suspicions regarding who actually made the call. (Hint: It’s a guy whose name the show can’t use for some stupid reason.) The new direction of the flashbacks works so well here. It directly connects them to the main action of the story. It shows us why Lorna and Eclipse feel the way they do without having to shoehorn in exposition about their past. We see it, so we don’t need to be told. It’s just better storytelling. Hey, Gifted? More like this, please.Stephen Moyer and Amy Acker (Photo Credit: Annette Brown/FOX)It also gives the rest of the episode a bit less time to tell it’s story, which turns out to be a good thing. It means the episode only focuses on what really matters. It doesn’t feel the need to give lip service to every character arc. For the most part, each scene has a reason to be here. We don’t need to spend another handful of scenes where Jace Turner broods and drags his feet before ultimately coming down on the side of fascism. Again. Instead, the focus is on Lorna figuring out how she’s going to keep her child safe in a world where Purifiers are killing people like her. Esme offers a hard solution that doesn’t appear to have an alternative: Send Dawn to a boarding school in Switzerland. Lorna’s willing to do it, because it’s the only way to guarantee her safety. As she tells Eclipse when she brings Dawn over to say goodbye, she’d rather have her daughter grow up hating her than not grow up at all.That scene between Polaris and Eclipse is so well done, too. Both Sean Teale and Emma Dumont make you feel how heartbreaking this process is for them. They’ve spent so much time apart this season, it’s easy to forget the great chemistry they had in Season One. They work really well together, and it almost hurts when Lorna takes Dawn away, and for a brief moment as their hands touch, the aurora borealis appears around them. It’s a beautiful, painful scene. It’s why Lorna’s change of heart is completely earned, along with the fact that it isn’t a complete 180. She still puts her child somewhere safe, but doesn’t send her all the way to Switzerland. She follows in her father’s footsteps and asks the woman who raised her to take care of Dawn. It’s a little better, and Eclipse receiving a text update assuring him that his daughter is loved is a perfectly bittersweet moment. The scene directly afterwards provides some excellent contrast too. I’ve been calling Lorna Polaris since the beginning, but this is the episode we really see her become that version of the character. She fashions her old birthday present into the iconic headband. She looks like such a badass here, and I really hope the series can live up to this awesome moment.Guest star Ken Kirby and Natalie Alyn Lind (Photo Credit: Annette Brown/FOX)The Strucker story is surprisingly engrossing as well. The show’s finally doing something with Reed’s powers, you guys! Caitlin and Lauren get him to a university hospital run by a doctor who used to work with his father. We get some more backstory on the Fenris twins, which suitably freaks Lauren out. The more we learn about them, the more they sound like Lauren and Andy. You know, except for the incestuous Nazis thing. That’s not the only thing that starts to freak Lauren out, though. At first, everything seems OK. Dr. Risman is working on treatments that allows mutants whose powers hurt them and others to control or suppress them. The treatment works on Reed temporarily, but the doctor needs to test Lauren’s blood to create a more permanent version. Reed, whose powers have brought him nothing but pain and destruction so far, is on board with that plan, and Lauren is too at first. Especially since she meets a cute boy who shows her that college is still a possibility for her.What the episode does really well in these scenes is subtly convey the feeling that this place isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. At first it seems like the Struckers have found an ally. A doctor who’s sympathetic to the mutants’ plight, and wants to help them however she can. She even points out one girl who can make plants grow. Her parents wanted to cure her, but she insists there’s nothing to cure. So the doctor gave the girl a job tending to the clinic’s plants. OK, so why is she locked up in her own room, like the guy who uncontrollably releases electricity from his skin. Dr. Risman espouses progressive views, but there may be something much more sinister under the surface. Especially once Lauren finds out the true goal of the mutant serum she’s working on. She wants to suppress the X gene permanently. Her assistant says it’ll be for people who don’t want it in themselves or don’t want it in their families. That last part raises additional red flags. Suddenly, it makes total sense when we learn that Risman’s brother is the founder of The Purifiers. She claims to hate him, but we get the sense it’s his methods she disagrees with. She sounds completely on board with his goals. That’s a chilling revelation to leave us with for the week.Blair Redford and Jamie Chung (Photo Credit: Annette Brown/FOX)This was a particularly strong episode of The Gifted. It focused on moving a smaller number of stories forward, and really dove into how the characters are dealing with their situations. This is what I want to see more of on this show. There are some good characters here, and the series is better when they’re given room to breathe. The only bits that don’t work are the Thunderbird/Blink scenes. They spend the episode tracking down Rebecca to learn why the Inner Circle hit the bank. They get the name of what Reeva was after, and that’s it. We learn nothing new, and there’s a ton of needless relationship drama where Blink worries to no end. At least we got a particularly gruesome image of what Rebecca can do to a person. The image of the guy with his limbs and ears in the wrong places is going to stick with me, that’s for sure. And hey, when the rest of the episode is so strong, it’s easier to forgive a weaker storyline. Now I just hope the series can carry this momentum through the season’s second half.The Gifted airs Tuesdays at 8 p.m. on Fox.Previously on The Gifted:last_img

first_imgThe Gifted Season 2 Episode 7 RecapThe Gifted Season 2 Episode 6 RecapThe Gifted Season 2 Episode 5 Recap Stay on target ‘The Gifted’ S2 Finale Recap: Death, Destruction & Hope for Season 3’The Gifted’ Season 2, Ep 5 Recap: The Reunion We’ve Waited For center_img We’ve reached the halfway point of Season Two of The Gifted, and things are just now starting to kick into gear. Much of the first half of this season now feels like the show setting up the world of last night’s episode. We met a new faction in the Morlocks, which I’m positive are going to be even more important in the season’s second half. We got to know The Purifiers, and while they don’t have a huge presence in this episode, their influence ominously hangs over each scene. The Mutant Underground has been pushed even further apart, and even the inner circle is in disarray. The situation feels dire for mutants of all stripes, which makes for some captivating TV.To no one’s surprise, everything went real bad after Rebecca slaughtered everyone in the bank at the end of the last episode. It’s a Purifier’s paradise out there. Humans are attacking mutants, and riots and fires are breaking out all over the city. There’s one particularly horrifying event we’re only shown: A group of human supremacists set fire to a foster home. It’s unclear if any of the kids living there survived. Over the course of the episode, we see each character react to the news. It’s an effective way to make us feel their fear. We all know the feeling of watching the news and seeing something horrible happening in your own country, and feeling completely helpless to do anything about it. Through that lens, we can immediately understand their actions.Emma Dumont and Skyler Samuels (Photo Credit: Annette Brown/FOX)For Lorna, that means getting her baby as far away from the Inner Circle as possible. After Rebecca slaughtered a room full of (mostly) innocent people and ran off on her own, Lorna’s convinced the Inner Circle can’t protect her baby. Especially with the world growing less stable by the minute. This isn’t what Reeva promised her at the beginning of the season. For her, this episode is all about coming to terms with who her father was and why he wasn’t around as she grew up. The show still never says the name “Magneto,” and it feels more awkward here than ever before. Especially since it’s painfully clear who their talking about, what with him leading the “brotherhood” that’s on the news and sending Lorna a metal disc that looks exactly like his iconic helmet when she was a teenager.This episode goes in a different direction when it comes to the flashbacks. Usually, The Gifted opens with one that introduces the general themes of the episode, and most of the time never mentions them again. Here, we got multiple flashbacks throughout the episode to different points in Lorna’s life. We see her as an angry teenager, rejecting the only birthday message she ever got from her father, while keeping the gift itself. We see her as a young adult who gets arrested after flipping over a car belonging to a guy who wouldn’t leave her alone at a bar. Her foster mother gets her out of jail a little too easily, which certainly raises her suspicions regarding who actually made the call. (Hint: It’s a guy whose name the show can’t use for some stupid reason.) The new direction of the flashbacks works so well here. It directly connects them to the main action of the story. It shows us why Lorna and Eclipse feel the way they do without having to shoehorn in exposition about their past. We see it, so we don’t need to be told. It’s just better storytelling. Hey, Gifted? More like this, please.Stephen Moyer and Amy Acker (Photo Credit: Annette Brown/FOX)It also gives the rest of the episode a bit less time to tell it’s story, which turns out to be a good thing. It means the episode only focuses on what really matters. It doesn’t feel the need to give lip service to every character arc. For the most part, each scene has a reason to be here. We don’t need to spend another handful of scenes where Jace Turner broods and drags his feet before ultimately coming down on the side of fascism. Again. Instead, the focus is on Lorna figuring out how she’s going to keep her child safe in a world where Purifiers are killing people like her. Esme offers a hard solution that doesn’t appear to have an alternative: Send Dawn to a boarding school in Switzerland. Lorna’s willing to do it, because it’s the only way to guarantee her safety. As she tells Eclipse when she brings Dawn over to say goodbye, she’d rather have her daughter grow up hating her than not grow up at all.That scene between Polaris and Eclipse is so well done, too. Both Sean Teale and Emma Dumont make you feel how heartbreaking this process is for them. They’ve spent so much time apart this season, it’s easy to forget the great chemistry they had in Season One. They work really well together, and it almost hurts when Lorna takes Dawn away, and for a brief moment as their hands touch, the aurora borealis appears around them. It’s a beautiful, painful scene. It’s why Lorna’s change of heart is completely earned, along with the fact that it isn’t a complete 180. She still puts her child somewhere safe, but doesn’t send her all the way to Switzerland. She follows in her father’s footsteps and asks the woman who raised her to take care of Dawn. It’s a little better, and Eclipse receiving a text update assuring him that his daughter is loved is a perfectly bittersweet moment. The scene directly afterwards provides some excellent contrast too. I’ve been calling Lorna Polaris since the beginning, but this is the episode we really see her become that version of the character. She fashions her old birthday present into the iconic headband. She looks like such a badass here, and I really hope the series can live up to this awesome moment.Guest star Ken Kirby and Natalie Alyn Lind (Photo Credit: Annette Brown/FOX)The Strucker story is surprisingly engrossing as well. The show’s finally doing something with Reed’s powers, you guys! Caitlin and Lauren get him to a university hospital run by a doctor who used to work with his father. We get some more backstory on the Fenris twins, which suitably freaks Lauren out. The more we learn about them, the more they sound like Lauren and Andy. You know, except for the incestuous Nazis thing. That’s not the only thing that starts to freak Lauren out, though. At first, everything seems OK. Dr. Risman is working on treatments that allows mutants whose powers hurt them and others to control or suppress them. The treatment works on Reed temporarily, but the doctor needs to test Lauren’s blood to create a more permanent version. Reed, whose powers have brought him nothing but pain and destruction so far, is on board with that plan, and Lauren is too at first. Especially since she meets a cute boy who shows her that college is still a possibility for her.What the episode does really well in these scenes is subtly convey the feeling that this place isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. At first it seems like the Struckers have found an ally. A doctor who’s sympathetic to the mutants’ plight, and wants to help them however she can. She even points out one girl who can make plants grow. Her parents wanted to cure her, but she insists there’s nothing to cure. So the doctor gave the girl a job tending to the clinic’s plants. OK, so why is she locked up in her own room, like the guy who uncontrollably releases electricity from his skin. Dr. Risman espouses progressive views, but there may be something much more sinister under the surface. Especially once Lauren finds out the true goal of the mutant serum she’s working on. She wants to suppress the X gene permanently. Her assistant says it’ll be for people who don’t want it in themselves or don’t want it in their families. That last part raises additional red flags. Suddenly, it makes total sense when we learn that Risman’s brother is the founder of The Purifiers. She claims to hate him, but we get the sense it’s his methods she disagrees with. She sounds completely on board with his goals. That’s a chilling revelation to leave us with for the week.Blair Redford and Jamie Chung (Photo Credit: Annette Brown/FOX)This was a particularly strong episode of The Gifted. It focused on moving a smaller number of stories forward, and really dove into how the characters are dealing with their situations. This is what I want to see more of on this show. There are some good characters here, and the series is better when they’re given room to breathe. The only bits that don’t work are the Thunderbird/Blink scenes. They spend the episode tracking down Rebecca to learn why the Inner Circle hit the bank. They get the name of what Reeva was after, and that’s it. We learn nothing new, and there’s a ton of needless relationship drama where Blink worries to no end. At least we got a particularly gruesome image of what Rebecca can do to a person. The image of the guy with his limbs and ears in the wrong places is going to stick with me, that’s for sure. And hey, when the rest of the episode is so strong, it’s easier to forgive a weaker storyline. Now I just hope the series can carry this momentum through the season’s second half.The Gifted airs Tuesdays at 8 p.m. on Fox.Previously on The Gifted:last_img

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