New Study Investigates Neuroimaging Use for Stroke Victims

first_img News | Digital Pathology | July 16, 2019 Paige Announces Clinical-grade Artificial Intelligence in Pathology July 16, 2019 — Computational pathology… read more Images of regions of interest (colored lines) in the white matter skeleton representation. Data from left and right anterior thalamic radiation (ATR) were averaged. Image courtesy of C. Bouziane et al. June 1, 2016 — A person is admitted to the hospital with a stroke, but not much is known about whether or not that patient will undergo neuroimaging.A team led by Achala Vagal, M.D., associate professor at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine and a UC Health radiologist, wanted to see whether differences in race, sex and/or age mattered when it came to neuroimaging use. These findings, which showed a difference for young patients, men and African-Americans, were presented at the American Society of Neuroradiology’s (ASNR) annual meeting, May 23-26 in Washington, D.C.“Rates of diagnostic workup in stroke have increased over time; however, less is known about differences in utilization of neuroimaging for stroke from a population perspective,” she said. “In this study, we found that age, sex and race do matter as far as neuroimaging use is concerned.”This study used data from the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky Stroke Study for which UC Department of Neurology’s Brett Kissela, M.D., and Dawn Kleindorfer, M.D., are co-principal investigators. The dataset includes cases from hospitals, clinics, coroners’ offices, nursing homes and physician offices from a five-county region that is representative of the United States for age, percentage of African-American residents, median income and educational level. Patient charts and imaging records from stroke patients in calendar years 2005 and 2010 were pulled by research nurses and reviewed by study physicians. The proportion of imaging use within two days of stroke occurrence or hospital admission date — including head computed tomography (CT) without contrast, head magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), CT angiogram, MR angiogram and carotid ultrasound — was calculated.Researchers also calculated odds of using advanced imaging, adjusting for insurance, the baseline using the NIH stroke scale, patients who came to the emergency room first and the hospital type — academic versus community hospital.“In 2005, there were 3,471 stroke or mini-stroke (transient ischemic attack) events with imaging data available in 3,226 patients, and in 2010, there were 3,431 events with imaging data in 3,213 patients,” Vagal says. “We found that a higher proportion of males received MRI, 55 percent versus 51 percent, and MR angiogram, 36 percent versus 31 percent, as compared to females in both 2005 and 2010, with no gender differences in use of the other imaging techniques.“A higher proportion of African-Americans received head CT imaging without contrast, 96 percent versus 92 percent, MRI, 59 percent versus 51 percent, and MR angiogram, 41 percent versus 31 percent, as compared to Caucasians with no racial difference in the other imaging modalities. All imaging use except CT without contrast and carotid ultrasound was higher in younger patients, aged less than 55 years, as compared to older patients.”The odds of receiving advanced imaging was higher in younger patients (less than 55-years-old), African-American patients and patients who came to an academic center or were seen by a stroke team/neurologist. She says results also showed that odds of receiving a head CT scan without contrast did not differ significantly by age, sex and race.“The differences discovered in this study may be partly driven by age, with younger patients getting more extensive workups and partly by access to stroke expertise,” she says. “However, further understanding of the contributors can provide an important basis for newer lines of inquiry into environmental, socioeconomic and access to healthcare issues.”For more information: www.asnr.org FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 News | Neuro Imaging | June 01, 2016 New Study Investigates Neuroimaging Use for Stroke Victims Investigators find age, sex and race impact what type of imaging is used News | Neuro Imaging | July 05, 2019 Delta T1 Maps Provide Quantitative, Automated Solution to Assess Brain Tumor Burden Imaging Biometrics LLC (IB) a subsidiary of IQ-AI Ltd., is highlighting a recently published study in the American… read more Related Content News | Neuro Imaging | August 16, 2019 ADHD Medication May Affect Brain Development in Children A drug used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appears to affect development of the brain’s… read more Technology | Neuro Imaging | August 07, 2019 Synaptive Medical Launches Modus Plan With Automated Tractography Segmentation Synaptive Medical announced the U.S. launch and availability of Modus Plan featuring BrightMatter AutoSeg. This release… read more News | Ultrasound Women’s Health | July 11, 2019 FDA Clears Koios DS Breast 2.0 AI-based Software Koios Medical announced its second 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Technology | Artificial Intelligence | June 19, 2019 Third FDA Clearance Announced for Zebra-Med’s AI Solution for Brain Bleed Alerts Zebra Medical Vision announced it has received its third U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) clearance for… read more News | Clinical Decision Support | July 18, 2019 Johns Hopkins Named Qualified Provider-led Entity to Develop Criteria for Diagnostic Imaging On June 30, 2019, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) announced the Johns Hopkins University School… read more News | Cardio-oncology | July 29, 2019 Statins Reduce Stroke, Cardiovascular Risk in Cancer Patients Following Radiation Cancer patients taking cholesterol-lowering statin medication following radiation therapy of the chest, neck or head… read more Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 7:33Loaded: 2.15%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -7:33 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. News | Stroke | August 16, 2019 Mobile Stroke Unit Gets Patients Quicker Treatment Than Traditional Ambulance Every second counts for stroke patients, as studies show they can lose up to 27 million brain cells per minute…. read more read more Videos | Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President … read more Image courtesy of UTHealth McGovern Medical Schoollast_img

first_img News | Digital Pathology | July 16, 2019 Paige Announces Clinical-grade Artificial Intelligence in Pathology July 16, 2019 — Computational pathology… read more Images of regions of interest (colored lines) in the white matter skeleton representation. Data from left and right anterior thalamic radiation (ATR) were averaged. Image courtesy of C. Bouziane et al. June 1, 2016 — A person is admitted to the hospital with a stroke, but not much is known about whether or not that patient will undergo neuroimaging.A team led by Achala Vagal, M.D., associate professor at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine and a UC Health radiologist, wanted to see whether differences in race, sex and/or age mattered when it came to neuroimaging use. These findings, which showed a difference for young patients, men and African-Americans, were presented at the American Society of Neuroradiology’s (ASNR) annual meeting, May 23-26 in Washington, D.C.“Rates of diagnostic workup in stroke have increased over time; however, less is known about differences in utilization of neuroimaging for stroke from a population perspective,” she said. “In this study, we found that age, sex and race do matter as far as neuroimaging use is concerned.”This study used data from the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky Stroke Study for which UC Department of Neurology’s Brett Kissela, M.D., and Dawn Kleindorfer, M.D., are co-principal investigators. The dataset includes cases from hospitals, clinics, coroners’ offices, nursing homes and physician offices from a five-county region that is representative of the United States for age, percentage of African-American residents, median income and educational level. Patient charts and imaging records from stroke patients in calendar years 2005 and 2010 were pulled by research nurses and reviewed by study physicians. The proportion of imaging use within two days of stroke occurrence or hospital admission date — including head computed tomography (CT) without contrast, head magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), CT angiogram, MR angiogram and carotid ultrasound — was calculated.Researchers also calculated odds of using advanced imaging, adjusting for insurance, the baseline using the NIH stroke scale, patients who came to the emergency room first and the hospital type — academic versus community hospital.“In 2005, there were 3,471 stroke or mini-stroke (transient ischemic attack) events with imaging data available in 3,226 patients, and in 2010, there were 3,431 events with imaging data in 3,213 patients,” Vagal says. “We found that a higher proportion of males received MRI, 55 percent versus 51 percent, and MR angiogram, 36 percent versus 31 percent, as compared to females in both 2005 and 2010, with no gender differences in use of the other imaging techniques.“A higher proportion of African-Americans received head CT imaging without contrast, 96 percent versus 92 percent, MRI, 59 percent versus 51 percent, and MR angiogram, 41 percent versus 31 percent, as compared to Caucasians with no racial difference in the other imaging modalities. All imaging use except CT without contrast and carotid ultrasound was higher in younger patients, aged less than 55 years, as compared to older patients.”The odds of receiving advanced imaging was higher in younger patients (less than 55-years-old), African-American patients and patients who came to an academic center or were seen by a stroke team/neurologist. She says results also showed that odds of receiving a head CT scan without contrast did not differ significantly by age, sex and race.“The differences discovered in this study may be partly driven by age, with younger patients getting more extensive workups and partly by access to stroke expertise,” she says. “However, further understanding of the contributors can provide an important basis for newer lines of inquiry into environmental, socioeconomic and access to healthcare issues.”For more information: www.asnr.org FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 News | Neuro Imaging | June 01, 2016 New Study Investigates Neuroimaging Use for Stroke Victims Investigators find age, sex and race impact what type of imaging is used News | Neuro Imaging | July 05, 2019 Delta T1 Maps Provide Quantitative, Automated Solution to Assess Brain Tumor Burden Imaging Biometrics LLC (IB) a subsidiary of IQ-AI Ltd., is highlighting a recently published study in the American… read more Related Content News | Neuro Imaging | August 16, 2019 ADHD Medication May Affect Brain Development in Children A drug used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appears to affect development of the brain’s… read more Technology | Neuro Imaging | August 07, 2019 Synaptive Medical Launches Modus Plan With Automated Tractography Segmentation Synaptive Medical announced the U.S. launch and availability of Modus Plan featuring BrightMatter AutoSeg. This release… read more News | Ultrasound Women’s Health | July 11, 2019 FDA Clears Koios DS Breast 2.0 AI-based Software Koios Medical announced its second 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Technology | Artificial Intelligence | June 19, 2019 Third FDA Clearance Announced for Zebra-Med’s AI Solution for Brain Bleed Alerts Zebra Medical Vision announced it has received its third U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) clearance for… read more News | Clinical Decision Support | July 18, 2019 Johns Hopkins Named Qualified Provider-led Entity to Develop Criteria for Diagnostic Imaging On June 30, 2019, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) announced the Johns Hopkins University School… read more News | Cardio-oncology | July 29, 2019 Statins Reduce Stroke, Cardiovascular Risk in Cancer Patients Following Radiation Cancer patients taking cholesterol-lowering statin medication following radiation therapy of the chest, neck or head… read more Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 7:33Loaded: 2.15%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -7:33 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. News | Stroke | August 16, 2019 Mobile Stroke Unit Gets Patients Quicker Treatment Than Traditional Ambulance Every second counts for stroke patients, as studies show they can lose up to 27 million brain cells per minute…. read more read more Videos | Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President … read more Image courtesy of UTHealth McGovern Medical Schoollast_img

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *