Docklands building peaks

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

First Cyber Battalion coming to Indiana

first_imgIndianapolis, IN—The Army National Guard announced that the Secretary of the Army will station the 127th Cyber Protection Battalion in Indianapolis, Indiana. Indiana was selected out of eighteen states competing for this significant achievement. As the seventh-largest Army National Guard contingent in the nation, the Indiana National Guard will join the U.S. Cyber Command’s mission pool by the fiscal year 2022.last_img

O’Shea has a point to prove

first_img O’Shea said: “The negative vibe around because of such poor performances has not totally gone – we didn’t win, we got a draw, but it’s something to start with.” The home side started the game well, but fell behind on the stroke of half-time when their concentrations slipped and Bafetimbi Gomis pounced to convert Kyle Naughton’s pass for his third goal in as many games. However, Sunderland were back on level terms with 62 minutes gone when Jermain Defoe fired past Lukasz Fabianski from Jeremain Lens’ through-ball, and they might have claimed all three points in a rousing finish during which they might have been awarded a penalty for handball against Ashley Williams. All in all, it was a much improved display from Advocaat’s men, with O’Shea’s leadership and organisational skills proving invaluable on his return to the team after being named only among the substitutes for the opening two fixtures. The Republic of Ireland international said: “Look, it’s one of those things. The manager is the manager. I have always been brought up in the way that you have to respect the decision of the manager. “I do my stuff in training and if he is going to pick me, he is going to pick me. That’s the way I have always kind of done things. “I was obviously delighted to come back in and help the team anyway I can. But more importantly, the squad a s whole, we have to have that attitude if we want to succeed in the Premier League. “Yes, everyone wants to play, but as the manager will always say, he’s going to have to disappoint a few people. That’s just the Premier League.” Sunderland skipper John O’Shea has urged his team-mates to use their first point of the season as a springboard to ease themselves up the Barclays Premier League table. The Black Cats belatedly opened their account for the campaign with a hard-fought 1-1 draw with Swansea on Saturday and showed commendable resilience to claw their way back into the game after falling behind. It was not the win head coach Dick Advocaat craved after desperately poor performances in defeat by both Leicester and Norwich and they remained at the foot of the table on goal difference, but it was a start. Advocaat hopes to increase that competition further during the remaining days of the transfer window and sent a fresh message to chairman Ellis Short, who had earlier used his programme notes to hit back at criticism of his reign, after the final whistle. The Dutchman said: “We still need something, and hopefully our president will realise that as well because you cannot bring that every week.” Opposite number Garry Monk headed back to South Wales bemoaning the two points that got away, but was satisfied with his side’s start to the season. He said: “At this moment in time, I think as a team we are a handful. That’s the way we set up, it’s the way I want us to play. “We are aggressive without the ball and we will try to be aggressive with it as well. Unfortunately, we didn’t the get three points we probably should have had.” Press Associationlast_img read more

Thiem’s FEAT

first_img– Thiem is the fifth man since the Open Era began in 1968 to come back from two sets down in a major final. He joins Gaston Gaudio (d. Guillermo Coria, 2004 French Open), Andre Agassi (d. Andrei Medvedev, 1999 French Open), Ivan Lendl (d. John McEnroe, 1984 French Open) and Bjorn Borg (d. Manual Orantes, 1974 French Open). In a US Open final, Thiem becomes the first man to come back from two sets down since 1949, when Pancho Gonzalez did the same against Ted Schroeder. – Thiem, 27, is also the first man born in the 1990s to win a Grand Slam title. On the women’s side, players born in the 1990s or later have combined to win 15 majors, including one by a woman born in the 2000s (Bianca Andreescu, 2019 US Open). – This is the first time in men’s tennis that four consecutive Grand Slam finals have gone to five sets (2019 Wimbledon, 2019 US Open, 2020 Australian Open and 2020 US Open). Before this, there had only been two instances of three straight men’s major finals going to five sets (in 1927 and 1946). – Thiem is the second Austrian player, male or female, to win a Grand Slam singles title, after Thomas Muster won the 1995 French Open. Thiem is the only Austrian to make multiple major finals, in which his win-loss record now stands at 1-3. – This was just the second men’s Grand Slam final to feature a deciding-set tiebreaker, after the 2019 Wimbledon final between Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic. Last year was the first time Wimbledon began playing a tiebreaker once the set got to 12-12. – It is the longest span (6 years) between first-time major winners on the men’s side in the Open Era. The previous longest was almost exactly three years between Juan Martin del Potro (2009 US Open) and Andy Murray (2012 US Open). Also Watch: Watch: River Flows Inside People’s Bedroomlast_img read more

Change in philosophy helps Division-III Texas Lutheran end losing streak

first_img Comments The 0-10 Texas Lutheran football team needed a community. And it was going to take some prodding. That is how bad the situation got in Seguin, Texas. Danny Padron is the solution to the problem. Padron, a man who was already the head of a different community: the O’Connor High School (Texas) Panthers. Texas Lutheran went back to school, back to the roots and back to the community for the Texas football connections it needed. And through five games, it has worked. The community is there. And it is because the leader is there. ‘Coach Padron and his coaches did the right things across campus — they’re vocal about a student athlete’s success academically,’ TLU Athletic Director Bill Miller said. ‘They made themselves visible across campus. ‘They’ve become part of the community.’AdvertisementThis is placeholder text And in the process of becoming part of that community, he has brought Division III Texas Lutheran back to its long forgotten traditional Texas football roots. Currently, Texas Lutheran sits at 3-2 on the season. On Sept. 18, TLU snapped a 14-game losing streak with a win in the second game of the season against East Texas Baptist. But for the school, it is less about the record and more about the change in philosophy. ‘What we were doing before wasn’t working,’ Miller said. ‘As a result, this new coach has come in and increased the level of discipline in the program.’ At different points in TLU’s football history, that sense of community wasn’t there. After it was a powerhouse in the mid 1970s in the NAIA, the football team sunk into submission. The Bulldogs weren’t in a conference at the time, making scheduling in-state opponents nearly impossible. So the sport was dropped after the 1987 season. In 1998, after a change in dynamic for small colleges in Texas, the team joined the American Southwest Conference and started to rebuild what was once a strong program. Naturally, it had problems along the way. But that 2009 season was the tipping point for the school. A change was needed. Enter Padron. Padron, a long-time high school football coach, had all the connections, including perhaps the most important one in Miller. Miller and Padron coached together at Judson High School in Converse, Texas, for six years in the 1980s, and Miller had followed Padron’s progress as head coach, even after he left to work at Texas Lutheran. In a state as big as Texas, and with a sport as popular as football, Miller knew the talent was out there. And he knew Padron could reach it. But Miller also knew Padron wasn’t going to be an easy recruit himself. Texas high school football is a big deal, and Miller knew Padron was happy at O’Connor High School. And TLU does not even have a football stadium. ‘Our facilities,’ Miller said, ‘probably aren’t as good as where he was at.’ Padron himself wasn’t sure if he wanted to make the switch, either. The team was playing well, and he had the opportunity to coach with his son, a math teacher at the school. He was next in line for athletic director at the high school and kept turning down offers from schools to coach elsewhere. But his old friend Miller came to him with a strong appeal. Padron met with the then-Texas Lutheran president Ann Svennungsen and was impressed with the pitch she had. ‘She had a great vision,’ Padron said. ‘I said, ‘Well, I could at least go through the process.” What sold Padron was that he could surround himself with the coaching staff he wanted. When he began to think harder about the decision, he started phoning in some friends and getting their take on the situation. One by one, those friends were sold, and his would-be coaching staff came together. However, one thing was holding Padron back. His son, Andy, had just joined the O’Connor staff. And Padron didn’t want to lose the opportunity to coach with him. But he didn’t want to force his son to coach at the college level if he wasn’t ready. After all, Andy had just graduated in 2007 from the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, where he started at quarterback for championship teams. ‘He was one of the reasons I didn’t want to leave. I told him, ‘I’m not going to go because of you,” Padron said. ‘He said, ‘Dad, I want to coach in college.” So the Padrons took up coaching over in Seguin. When he arrived in January, the team was decimated. After the fall 2009 semester, only 50 players remained. Miller said this turnover wasn’t necessarily a bad thing. ‘Some of the players we had in the program were not good fits for the university, both on and off the field,’ Miller said. ‘He had to completely change the mindset of some of the players that were already here; he had to develop an expectation of winning.’ So the coaches took to recruiting. These coaches were so accustomed to the recruiting aspect from the other direction that they had to make adjustments now that they were the ones trying to get players to come to them. ‘We didn’t get our feet back on the ground until the summer,’ Padron said. ‘We were learning on the run. We worked our heads off. We were working six, seven days a week and did a great job all over the state of Texas. ‘We relied on a lot of our friendships. We know a lot of high school coaches. They were able to trust us, and we got good boys. Not the best ones, but it’s a start.’ The coaches were able to recruit about 90 freshmen, and of the top 44 out on the field, 36 of them are fresh out of high school. The coaches and administrators are excited about the quick start to the season, but they recognize the rest of the road won’t be smooth. Upcoming games include conference matchups against No. 10 Hardin-Simmons on Oct. 23 and No. 5 Mary Hardin-Baylor on Nov. 13 to end the regular season. Regardless of how the season ends, Padron is satisfied with the change he’s already seen in his short time in Seguin. The community is getting there. From one person to the next. Padron was the start. ‘It’s about teaching them how to be a good person — that’s the reason why I coach,’ Padron said. ‘It’s not just about winning football games, it’s about making the people we work with better.’ knmciner@syr.edu Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Published on October 13, 2010 at 12:00 pmlast_img read more

How Syracuse men’s lacrosse adopted the faceoff culture

first_imgThat includes three overtime losses, two of which he lost the opening faceoff in extra time and the opponent won on the ensuing possession. It’s the only knock on his short, yet decorated collegiate resume, and he knows it. The game-changing faceoff has eluded Williams, and he’s hell-bent on fixing his late-game failures to validate his program’s investment in him.As SU stares down its first NCAA tournament opponent on Sunday, Williams could be the difference between an early exit or a national championship.“The more you’re in (crucial faceoffs), the more comfortable you get there,” Williams said. “It’s just another faceoff and you’ve just got to go out there with the mentality that you’re going to get your team the ball.“We’re not saving lives, it’s just a faceoff.”But that simple task is exactly what SU is leaning on to break its longest championship drought since prior to 1983.One of the most celebrated lacrosse programs ever is wagering its present-day legacy on Williams and the faceoff. It was a new direction birthed from an embarrassing mess on the national stage, and Syracuse has done nearly all it can to clean up. What’s left is for Williams to make his own season-ending highlight reel — one he ends with a ring.Logan Reidsma | Senior Staff Photographer Comments Even with his playing days a handful of decades behind him, Donahue knows some things never changed with the faceoff. The quickest clamper at the X is still king in Donahue’s mind. “If you’re not a clamper, you’ve got to figure out how to be a clamper,” he’ll say. But if nothing else, Donahue’s keen on change. The method to winning faceoffs has evolved, and now Donahue’s tweaking stances and angles to the ball.To his unit of five faceoff men at Syracuse, a group that affectionately refers to itself as “The Sandbox,” Donahue preaches an oversimplified technique at the X before adjusting: Knee down, head leaned in and use power from your legs to trap the ball.“Coach Donahue is a scientist when it comes to this stuff,” junior specialist Joe DeMarco said. “He studies it more than anybody I’ve ever met. Working with him, I think understanding the technique is the biggest thing.”Coach Donahue is a scientist when it comes to this stuff. He studies it more than anybody I’ve ever met. Working with him, I think understanding the technique is the biggest thing.SU junior faceoff specialist Joe DemarcoDonahue’s become renowned for his knowledge, and it’s set Syracuse apart in its recruiting efforts. He managed to coach up Daddio through the rest of 2014. Daddio finished seven of his final 12 games above 50 percent in faceoffs. But what Donahue needed was a blank canvas. A player he could mold early.Desko could now deliver recruiting pitches with the promise of extra care being given to the faceoff specialists. That in fact, his program had a specialist for the specialists.Finding their manFormer Holy Cross head coach Jim Morrissey will be the first to say Minnesota is far from a lacrosse hotbed. Top-shelf talent is almost nonexistent, and lacrosse programs shrivel in the shadow of the Northeast’s kingpins.But Morrissey, leading a sub-par Crusaders program, felt he couldn’t pass up any recruiting email he received. Including one from Ben Williams, a lieutenant colonel at Saint Thomas Academy, a military high school on the periphery of Minneapolis.“I was the lucky one,” Morrissey said. “Us coaches get a million emails. I was the lucky one that said I need to read pretty much every email, because who was I not to turn over every stone?“Luckily I turned over that stone and there was Ben Williams.”In Williams’ first and only season under Morrissey in 2014, he largely self-taught his way to a 53-percent faceoff clip. But he sought more out of his skill set. More out of a program than just going off on his own in practice to try new faceoff methods he occasionally picked off YouTube.He sought top-level competition and believed he was that caliber of a player.Never did Williams think Syracuse would be his platform to face the country’s best players, but that’s what happened once Donahue caught wind of Williams’ availability. He asked Gurenlian to watch the film on the Holy Cross freshman, and the faceoff connoisseur saw “immense potential.”“(You) can’t miss out on this kid,” Gurenlian told Donahue. “He’s special.”Aaron Na | Contributing Photographer That’s largely what it took for Syracuse’s prized possession to come into form, and he set an immediate precedent. He won 17-of-20 faceoffs against Siena in his first game with the Orange.An SU community long familiar with the run-and-gun, transition offense of Roy Simmons Jr.’s teams was submerged in déjà vu. Syracuse was running an adjusted form of the same operation, this time only using half the field. The ball hardly ever landed on the defensive side, as Williams kept torpedoing the offense from midfield.“Yep,” Donahue said when asked if he anticipated the immediate jolt from Williams. A smile creaked across his face. “I don’t know how else to answer that. I had a good feeling. I knew what I saw right away.”An 85-percent pace was unrealistic, but Williams hardly slowed down. He won at least 65 percent of faceoffs in six games last year, and shutout opponents at the X in 14 different quarters. Syracuse was handling the ball more than it had in years, and that played perfectly into the sticks of a dynamic offense run entirely by savvy veterans like Kevin Rice and Randy Staats.This season hasn’t gone much differently, as Williams’ faceoff clip is off just 0.8 percent from last year. He’s lost double-digit faceoffs only five times this season and averaged about 14 faceoff wins per ACC game.He’s given the Orange a rock to lean on for two years, fine-tuning his stance every week with Donahue so he can continue to incessantly feed the offense.The faceoff can propel a run or dig yourself out of a hole. It’s pretty important … You definitely think that way, but you kind of just have to focus on one at a time.Ben WilliamsWilliams is a master of that, despite the Carrier Dome scoreboard operators rejecting his request to hide the faceoff totals. Now he doesn’t look at the scoreboard anymore.But with each individual faceoff has come a trend that’s happened in bunches. A product of Syracuse developing a dependability on Williams to win early, and continue to winning. His fourth-quarter and overtime numbers have sunk this season, and in the Orange’s four losses this year, he’s won only 37 percent of faceoffs after the third quarter.Kiran Ramsey | Design Editor Facebook Twitter Google+ Gurenlian worked privately with Williams during the summer after his freshman year to get “the system” down pat. Morrissey, another former Syracuse All-American, phoned a strong recommendation for Williams into Desko. That pressed the veteran SU head coach to move quickly on the faceoff specialist, who drew interest elsewhere, namely an hour down the highway at Cornell.Desko had Williams, his parents and two brothers fly out to campus in June 2014 and sit in his office. He admits, as the head coach, he said things to Williams he wouldn’t normally say to a recruit: He had a hunch, and the opportunity for immediate impact was there.We needed him.SU head coach John DeskoAfter a campus tour from Donahue that served more as an extended recruiting pitch, the family departed home to Mendota Heights, Minnesota. It wasn’t long before Desko rang Williams’ line, and asked him to join the program.The program’s history was too good to pass up. The chance for immediate playing time was too good to pass up. And working with Donahue, who sold Williams’ father, David, from the onset, was far too good to pass up.“Desko said he believed in my ability as a player,” Williams recalled. “… Coming from a coach who probably talks to a lot of good players, that really meant a lot.“You never thought in a million years that John Desko would call me on the phone and say that.”LiftoffThe only thing Donahue wanted Williams to do was face the ball. The faceoff specialist previously taught himself to stand more upright at the X and face upfield, that way it was a straight shot to the goal if he won the draw. Williams had success in his self-taught ways, but the Syracuse assistant coach was adamant. Donahue needed Williams to let him install the system he wanted.From that point, only a matter of inches barricaded Williams between his formidable presence at Holy Cross and astronomical success. Williams always overcompensated when Donahue asked him to adjust a knee or hand. The assistant coach had to remind him it was just little tweaks, ones that still can make the difference in winning or losing a faceoff.Kiran Ramsey | Design Editor Making the “scientist”Two-hundred and ninety-five days after SU’s national championship implosion, when the team finished 9-for-30 at the X, Donahue was still looking for the right answer.Chris Daddio, SU’s turbulent faceoff man who went 0-for-4 against Fowler in the championship, was mired in an average season. He’d converted 48 percent of his chances through five games in 2014, and was headed into a matchup against St. John’s only 10-for-39 in his last two games — games that Syracuse lost by 13 goals combined.The timing was more than appropriate for Donahue to seek a faceoff remedy for the program. Through a bit of good fortune that SU was playing the Red Storm in Kennesaw, Georgia for the Cobb County Classic, former Orange All-American Liam Banks introduced Donahue to Major League Lacrosse faceoff man Greg Gurenlian.The two sat down for a substantial discussion that weekend in March, and Gurenlian pitched Donahue on The Faceoff Academy, Gurenlian’s coaching service. It wasn’t long before the Syracuse assistant coach was hanging on his every word.“Donahue deserves a ton of praise,” Gurenlian said. “At his level and with his experience, to buy completely into a new system with somebody that he hadn’t known for a long time, I give him a ton of credit.“He looks at the game differently. Not many (players) get a knowledgeable coach at the faceoff X.”It’s a coaching system that prioritizes faceoff stance, moves and countermoves among the eight pillars Gurenlian preaches. They started coaching Daddio that weekend in Georgia, and in turn, Donahue started absorbing the skills he needed to become a bona fide expert. “Oh definitely,” SU head coach John Desko said when asked about the national championship changing his perspective on faceoffs. “… We were feeling good about ourselves and all of the sudden the other team has the ball (15 of 16) times after goals.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“That was a big difference in that game.”May 27, 2013, was the springboard for Desko and his staff to leap into a largely untouched realm of the game with faceoff specialists. He enlisted assistant coach Kevin Donahue to master the modern intricacies of the position and ultimately reel in a program-changing player. Enter Ben Williams, a sophomore transfer from Holy Cross in 2015, who rose from a middling, 50-50 faceoff man to one of the sport’s elite under the guidance of Donahue.His first season was historically good last year. Williams finished with 256 wins at the X, the second-most in Orange history, and in turn notched the second-highest faceoff percentage in the country. The 6-foot junior has continued to trail blaze, boasting a top-five faceoff percentage this year and has No. 8 seed Syracuse (11-4, 2-2 Atlantic Coast) poised for a deep run into the NCAA tournament if he can win faceoffs at the copious rate he’s capable of.“I expect to help my team to the best of my abilities,” Williams said. “For me, that’s completely dominating. It’s hard to chase perfection, but we’re trying to chase the perfection.”Kiran Ramsey | Design Editor Published on May 13, 2016 at 9:38 pm Contact Connor: cgrossma@syr.edu | @connorgrossman Over and over again, Ben Williams studied the video of Brendan Fowler taking faceoffs. He’s seen it hundreds of times and examined it from every angle. He watched Fowler dominate at the X. How he positioned his body at the whistle. How he untangled himself from scrums around loose balls.How Fowler single-handedly ripped the 2013 national championship game out of Syracuse’s hands, won 15-of-16 draws at one point and turned a five-goal deficit into a 16-10 Duke win.Williams used Fowler to teach himself faceoff techniques in high school. Syracuse used Fowler to pioneer a new direction for its lacrosse program.last_img read more

Syracuse football recruiting: 2017 OL Dakota Davis commits to Orange

first_imgClass of 2017 offensive lineman Dakota Davis committed to Syracuse on Friday, he announced in a tweet. Scout.com first reported the news. Related Stories Syracuse football recruiting: Track the Class of 2017Tommy DeVito, Syracuse football QB commit, named to Elite 11 Final GroupClass of 2017 3-star wide receiver Joshua Palmer commits to SyracuseSyracuse football recruiting: Class of 2017 wide receiver Nykeim Johnson commits to the OrangeClass of 2017 linebacker Tyrell Richards commits to Syracuse Facebook Twitter Google+ The Glenelg (Maryland) High School product is ranked with two stars by Scout and unranked by 247sports.com. He picked Syracuse over offers from Connecticut, Ohio and Old Dominion, amongst others.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAccording to his Hudl.com profile, Davis — 6 feet 5 inches, 310 pounds — runs a 5.50 40-yard dash. He also bench presses 300 pounds and squats 435.Davis is the seventh commit to the Syracuse’s 2017 recruiting class, and the fourth commit in the past week. He’s also the first offensive lineman in Syracuse’s class.You can track the entire Class of 2017 here.Here is Davis’s junior year Hudl highlight tape.center_img Comments Published on June 24, 2016 at 12:14 pm Contact Tomer: tdlanger@syr.edu | @tomer_langerlast_img read more

QPR fight for Premier League survival takes on new impetus

first_imgThat’s if they fail to pay a potentially large fine for breaking the Football League’s financial fair play rules – who govern the second, third and fourth tiers.Football League chief executive Shaun Harvey says they have the right to refuse admission to their competitions to any team which fails to pay outstanding penalties.But he hopes there would be a resolution long before that.last_img

Tipperary Tornado ready for action.

first_imgMatthew Macklin is gearing up for one of the biggest fights of his career tomorrow night.The man with strong Tipperary links will fight in Ireland for the first time in nearly 5 years, when he faces Jorge Sebastian Heiland on Saturday at the 3 Arena in Dublin.The two will clash in a middleweight bout that is also a WBC world title eliminator. Whoever wins will take a big step towards a fight against WBC champion Miguel Cotto, although Macklin’s fellow Irishman Andy Lee could come into the reckoning.last_img read more

Tipp looking for second camogie league win

first_imgBrian Boyle’s team take on Dublin in their fourth game of the Division 1 Group 1 campaign at St Patrick’s College, Drumcondra.Throw-in is at 2 o’clock – we’ll keep you posted on developments from there on Tipp FM.last_img