Dell Technologies Capital Brings Innovative Technology to Customers

first_imgWhile one very visible venture capitalist may have recently hung up his spurs, the world’s largest privately-controlled technology company today brought out of stealth its venture practice, Dell Technologies Capital.Early on, Dell recognized the value of venture investing as a key tool for innovation, in addition to organic research and development, partnerships and acquisitions. But it was always about more than just investing money.“Capital is merely table stakes to set a startup company on the path to success. New companies are looking for active investment partners who provide breadth and depth of expertise and access to resources and scale,” said Scott Darling, president of Dell Technologies Capital.That why Dell Technologies Capital offers experienced board members, deep technical expertise as well as access to the global scale, channel, original equipment manufacturer (OEM) and go-to-market relationships that are unique to the Dell Technologies’ family of businesses. In addition, we provide access to industry-leading technologists, investors and company executives.And while you may not have heard much from the team of highly experienced investors at Dell Technologies Capital, you might have heard of some of their portfolio companies.“…we were able to utilize Dell Technologies’ ecosystem to collaborate and combine the powerful Dell EMC and Virtustream portfolio…ShareFor instance, Edico Genome announced earlier this year an agreement with Dell EMC to offer a bundled compute and storage solution that increases the maximum rate at which data can be processed.“Accelerating time to answers can lead to faster diagnoses for critically ill newborns, cancer patients and expecting parents waiting on prenatal tests, and allows scientists and drug developers to spend less time waiting for data and more time interpreting results,” Edico Genome CEO Pieter van Rooyen said.Edico Genome’s Dragen bioinformatics processor is now integrated into a 1U Dell PowerEdge 4130 server for genome analysis, as well as Dell EMC’s Isilon scale-out networked attached storage for genomic data storage across all levels of throughput capacity.“As a Dell Technologies Capital portfolio company, we were able to utilize Dell Technologies’ ecosystem to collaborate and combine the powerful Dell EMC and Virtustream portfolio with the speed and accuracy of the DRAGEN processor to offer a complete, cost-effective solution for rapid genomic analysis for new and existing customers,” he recently added.Dell Technologies Capital Capital has been an active investor in more than 70 other early-stage startups, and will continue to invest globally for Dell Technologies’ unique family of businesses including Dell, Dell EMC, Pivotal, RSA, SecureWorks, Virtustream and VMware.For more information about Dell Technologies Capital, including its current portfolio and previous investments, visit delltechnologies.com/capital.last_img read more

Student government hosts South Bend Scavenger Hunt

first_imgFor students who are looking for a study break or a change of pace, Notre Dame’s student government is hosting a scavenger hunt of the South Bend area. Students who visit the five sites on the Fall 2019 scavenger hunt list — and submit photo evidence — will be entered into a raffle for a prize.Junior Jessica Reeg and sophomore Erica Maggelet organized the scavenger hunt to promote the South Bend Adventure Guide, which the department of student engagement and outreach launched in August. The guide provides a list of sites and events students can explore in the South Bend area. The department hopes the scavenger hunt will help publicize the guide, as students share their experiences on social media.“As the department of community engagement and outreach, one of the biggest things we wanted to do is try to get more and more kids involved in the South Bend community — not just as a place to volunteer — but actually be a part of the community and go out, eat at local restaurants and shop and visit parks,” the department’s director, Alex Yom, said.Yom said he hopes the South Bend Adventure Guide can help bridge the divide between the Notre Dame and South Bend communities, encouraging students to step off campus and experience the city’s culture.“We saw there’s kind of a gap in between the availability of things to do in South Bend and not many people knowing about how to get there or what to do,” Yom said. “So we wanted to kind of fill that gap by developing a guide where people could turn to see, ‘If I’m looking to go off campus, this is somewhere I could go.’”Yom said the South Bend Adventure Guide offers “all kinds of different activities for students to do if they’re looking for a break from the everyday routine on campus.” He noted that students can now visit South Bend’s Howard Park, which had its grand reopening on Nov. 29. As a fun way to explore the city, Reeg encouraged students to check out “First Fridays” in downtown South Bend. Every first Friday of the month, she said, downtown South Bend has a themed showcase of events, restaurant deals and a different monthly theme. Although this semester’s scavenger hunt ends on Dec. 13, Reeg said the department is planning a spring scavenger hunt for next semester. She said she hopes students will take the opportunity to explore the community.“A lot of other schools have big college towns, especially state schools,” Reeg said. “And I think that there’s a tendency for Notre Dame students to stay within their little safe bubble, not really leave campus much because, in theory, you could really stay here — we have restaurants, we have things to do. And a lot of dorm culture stays on campus so [students] don’t even really go out socially too.”Sophomore Emma Kerr said she thinks many students have stigmas and preconceived notions about the city of South Bend.“I wasn’t sure about the South Bend area coming to Notre Dame, especially as a lot of my friends were going to big and bustling cities,” Kerr said. She said she would be interested in the scavenger hunt and hopes other students will take the time to engage with the South Bend community in meaningful ways.“There’s a lot going on in the city,” Kerr said. “And I think that sometimes kids just don’t take that initial step into the community.”Yom said the department of community engagement and outreach wants to foster a culture of engagement between students and the South Bend area. Currently, he said the department is developing a partnership with the Moreau First-Year Experience program, and they plan to put the South Bend Adventure Guide on next year’s Welcome Weekend app. “We’re trying to build a culture of getting off campus and enjoying the South Bend community from your first year on,” Yom said.Before the semester comes to an end, Reeg encouraged all students to visit the scavenger hunt locations and DM their photos to @sbadventure_guide on Instagram. ”[If you win the raffle], you get a gift card to Rocco’s Pizza — which is also another place on the guide,” Reeg said.Tags: Department of Community Engagement, Downtown South Bend, South Bend Adventure Guidelast_img read more

Honduras extradites alleged drug kingpin ‘Chancleta’ to the United States

first_imgHe was captured in the Department of Atlántida on September 10 by Honduran National Police, who arrested him while he was driving a pickup truck near the city of La Ceiba along the Caribbean coast. “Lobo’s arrest and extradition to the U.S. has led to the dismantling of an egregious trafficking organization,” said Alysa D. Erichs, the special agent in charge of Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) Miami. “This case highlights the effective collaboration between HSI, DEA and our international law enforcement partners.” Security forces suspect Chancleta assumed control of a major drug trafficking group after Carlos Arnoldo Lobo Alemán was captured in March by troops with FUSINA – an elite unit comprised of Army soldiers and National Police agents. They captured Lobo, also known as “El Negro Lobo” and “El Negro”, at a bakery in San Pedro Sula. Honduran security forces believe he’d been hiding in another Central American country and returned to Honduras days before his arrest. Under Honduran law, Chancleta and El Negro Lobo cannot be tried for crimes committed before 2012. That was the year the Honduran Constitution was changed to legalize the extradition of criminal suspects. Security forces suspect Chancleta assumed control of a major drug trafficking group after Carlos Arnoldo Lobo Alemán was captured in March by troops with FUSINA – an elite unit comprised of Army soldiers and National Police agents. They captured Lobo, also known as “El Negro Lobo” and “El Negro”, at a bakery in San Pedro Sula. Honduran security forces believe he’d been hiding in another Central American country and returned to Honduras days before his arrest. Before he was captured, El Negro Lobo allegedly ran a Honduran drug trafficking gang that works with Colombian organized crime groups, such as Los Mellos de Kasandra. El Negro Lobo also allegedly worked with the Sinaloa Cartel, a Mexican transnational criminal organization which traffics drugs into the U.S., Europe, the African continent and other destinations. In May, Honduran and U.S. law enforcement authorities extradited El Negro Lobo to the United States to face federal drug trafficking chages. Under Honduran law, Chancleta and El Negro Lobo cannot be tried for crimes committed before 2012. That was the year the Honduran Constitution was changed to legalize the extradition of criminal suspects. Attorneys for the two alleged drug kingpins can seek plea bargains with U.S. federal prosecutors in exchange for lighter sentences than they would receive if they were to go to trial and be convicted. By Dialogo October 31, 2014 Before he was captured, El Negro Lobo allegedly ran a Honduran drug trafficking gang that works with Colombian organized crime groups, such as Los Mellos de Kasandra. El Negro Lobo also allegedly worked with the Sinaloa Cartel, a Mexican transnational criminal organization which traffics drugs into the U.S., Europe, the African continent and other destinations. “Lobo’s arrest and extradition to the U.S. has led to the dismantling of an egregious trafficking organization,” said Alysa D. Erichs, the special agent in charge of Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) Miami. “This case highlights the effective collaboration between HSI, DEA and our international law enforcement partners.” He was captured in the Department of Atlántida on September 10 by Honduran National Police, who arrested him while he was driving a pickup truck near the city of La Ceiba along the Caribbean coast. Honduran security forces took another step toward dismantling a major narco-trafficking organization by extraditing to the United States alleged drug gang boss Juving Alexander Suazo Peralta, who is also known as “Chancleta.” Officers with the Special Operations Command (Cobra) of the Honduran National Police along with U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) agents escorted Chancleta to Toncontín National Airport for a flight to Miami. There, the alleged organized crime boss will face federal drug trafficking charges; U.S. federal prosecutors allege Chancleta directed large shipments of cocaine and hallucinogenic drugs into the United States. In May, Honduran and U.S. law enforcement authorities extradited El Negro Lobo to the United States to face federal drug trafficking chages. Attorneys for the two alleged drug kingpins can seek plea bargains with U.S. federal prosecutors in exchange for lighter sentences than they would receive if they were to go to trial and be convicted. Honduran security forces took another step toward dismantling a major narco-trafficking organization by extraditing to the United States alleged drug gang boss Juving Alexander Suazo Peralta, who is also known as “Chancleta.” Officers with the Special Operations Command (Cobra) of the Honduran National Police along with U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) agents escorted Chancleta to Toncontín National Airport for a flight to Miami. There, the alleged organized crime boss will face federal drug trafficking charges; U.S. federal prosecutors allege Chancleta directed large shipments of cocaine and hallucinogenic drugs into the United States. last_img read more

Venezuelans Unable To Prevent Diseases

first_imgBy Voice of America November 25, 2019 The regular water supply in Venezuela has declined notably, following a spike in power outages, creating more hardship for Venezuelan citizens. According to a study from the Venezuelan Observatory of Public Works, 72 percent of people store water. Not all, however, have the means to do it following international health standards to prevent diseases, such as by using airtight containers.Neither can all people boil water to make it potable, because the gas supply is increasingly irregular. “We don’t boil it, we collect it, and drink it like that, ready for whatever comes,” Miriam Vega told Voice of America’s Venezuela 360. Vega, who lives with her family in an impoverished area of Caracas, made the decision to limit the use of gas to ensure that her family is able to cook the little food they can afford.Like her, thousands of Venezuelans are forced to ration their use of basic services. The Nicolás Maduro regime, however, affirms it works to guarantee the quality of life of in communities.“Venezuela has a social security system, a social protection system, missions, great missions, and, specifically, a profoundly humane public health system that’s profoundly inclusive,” Maduro said at the end of August.Citizens who spoke to Voice of America, however, say the basic services crisis prevents them from following even the simplest recommendations to avoid propagating diseases, including dengue, chikungunya, or Zika, which can be fatal if not treated on time.last_img read more

NCUA’s MBL rule detailed in free March 3 webcast

first_imgLarry Fazio, director of the NCUA Office of Examination and Insurance, will deliver an overview of the agency’s recently finalized member business lending rule during a NAFCU webcast March 3.Thursday’s webcast is free, but registration is required.Last week, the NCUA Board voted 3-0 to approve a final MBL rule that, effective Jan. 1, 2017, eliminates the waiver process. Also, 60 days after the rule’s publication in the Federal Register, the personal guarantee requirement is eliminated.At the conclusion of the webcast, credit union viewers will understand the details of the final rule and how it will impact them. The webcast will also address some of the key areas examiners will focus on when reviewing commercial lending policies and infrastructure. continue reading » 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Carillion disclosures used as ‘good practice’ 12 months before bankruptcy

first_imgFailed engineering firm Carillion’s dividend disclosures were used as an example of good practice in a report published by the UK’s audit watchdog less than 18 months before the company collapsed.A December 2016 report from the Financial Reporting Council’s (FRC) Financial Reporting Lab singled out Carillion’s 2015 annual report as an example of good practice in dividend disclosure.The Lab noted that Carillion’s disclosure addressed “the factors and risks the board considers in setting the policy”.It highlighted the firm’s discussion of “distributable reserves and cash resources available to support the dividend”. UK politicians have since accused Carillion’s bosses of putting dividends ahead of its pension scheme. Carillion’s annual report for 2016 detailed that it had paid £393.7m (€450.7m) to shareholders since 2012, while making deficit contributions to its defined benefit (DB) schemes of £209.4m in total. Since last year, the UK’s Pensions Regulator has increased its emphasis on companies striking a balance between dividend payments and pension scheme deficit reduction payments.Tim Bush from Pensions & Investment Research Consultants told IPE: “The FRC’s Lab made the fatal error of trying to patch up with disclosure, rather than deal with the core of the problem, which is the numbers being unreliable and wrong.“It has managed to pick losers in a way that would make short sellers envious, but which makes the FRC as regulator an endorser – something it is unwise to do.”The FRC told IPE the Lab Report contained the views of investors, not those of the FRC.FRC criticised by MPs’ committeesMeanwhile, a report into Carillion’s collapse accused the FRC of a “timid” approach to the case. The joint report by the UK parliament’s Work and Pensions and Business select committees found that FRC’s “limited intervention” had failed to deter Carillion from an overly optimistic view of its financial health.It also claimed that the FRC was “happy to walk away after securing box-ticking disclosures of information.”The committees’ report said: “It was timid in challenging Carillion on the inadequate and questionable nature of the financial information it provided and wholly ineffective in taking to task the auditors who had responsibility for ensuring their veracity.”The FRC argued in response that it was “a strong, transparent regulator which makes use of its statutory powers and innovates, for example, by first introducing audit retendering and most recently an extended audit firm monitoring and supervisory approach”. Carillion was involved in the construction of a high-speed rail link between London and ManchesterA review of the FRC’s operations – and potentially its future – is currently underway. The business secretary Greg Clark has appointed former top civil servant Sir John Kingman to head the probe. He is currently taking evidence from stakeholders.At its peak, Carillion employed 43,000 people around the world, with roughly half of them in the UK. Last year it issued three profits warnings before going bust in January – dumping a pension liability estimated at £800m on the Pension Protection Fund, the UK’s defined benefit lifeboat scheme.Watchdog’s culture reviewAhead of the committees report, the FRC released its own Audit Culture Thematic Review last week.It described the study as a “snapshot” of the steps being taken by audit firms “to establish, promote and embed a culture that is committed to delivering consistently high quality audits.”“The FRC’s reports continue to highlight shortcomings of audits and then scandals highlight even more problems”Prem Sikka, University of SheffieldPrem Sikka, a professor of accounting at the University of Sheffield and long-standing critic of international accounting standards, queried why the FRC had published the thematic review ahead of the select committee report.The review said “nothing about the FRC’s own role” in failing to open up audits to public scrutiny, he added.“Which bit of their culture is changing and how?” Sikka said. “The FRC’s annual audit inspection reports continue to highlight shortcomings of audits and then scandals highlight even more problems.”Separately, the report also hit out at the UK government for failing to take decisive action to tackle corporate complacency and wrongdoing.The politicians said: “The government has recognised the regulatory weaknesses exposed by this and other corporate failures, but its responses have been cautious, largely technical, and characterised by seemingly endless consultation.“It has lacked the decisiveness or bravery to pursue bold measures recommended by our select committees that could make a significant difference. That must change.”In response to feedback on a 2016 green paper on corporate governance, the government pledged to bring in legislation requiring companies to explain how their directors comply with section 172 of the Companies Act 2006. This requires directors to have regard to the interests of wider stakeholders such as pension scheme members, employees, and the environment when running their business.last_img read more

ExxonMobil spuds Canadian well

first_imgWest Aquarius rig; Source: EquinorOil major ExxonMobil has started drilling operations on a well located offshore Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. According to information from the Canadian offshore regulator, C-NLOPB, the Seadrill-owned West Aquarius drilling rig started drilling operations at Harp L-42 well on October 11, 2019.The well is located in license EL 1135, which is operated by ExxonMobil with a 40% interest. Partners are Suncor and Equinor with a 30% interest each.It is worth reminding that ExxonMobil awarded a one-firm well contract to the West Aquarius rig back in 2018 and it was scheduled to start between May and July this year. The contract also included options for further extension.Offshore Energy Today StaffSpotted a typo? Have something more to add to the story? Maybe a nice photo? Contact our editorial team via email. Also, if you’re interested in showcasing your company, product or technology on Offshore Energy Today, please contact us via our advertising form where you can also see our media kit.last_img read more

Gay couple ready to become parents

first_imgBay of Plenty Times 16 July 2012 A homosexual couple considering adoption say sexuality should not be a consideration when choosing a good home for a child.  Kevin and Ben Haraki-Beckett, from Te Puke, say the decision on who should be allowed to adopt should be based purely on those concerned and the environment they could provide.  “Any child that is within the system that needs a good loving family and stable foundation should get that family. Kevin and I could provide that family,” said Ben, a 26-year-old who works in invoice processing.  “I have always wanted a big family. Growing up I always told my mother I would give her three granddaughters and I still want that,” he said.  The couple were reacting to a recent poll which stated adoption by homosexual couples is now accepted by most New Zealanders.  According to the Roy Morgan Research State of the Nation Report, a countrywide survey of 11,500 people, the number who believe homosexual couples should be allowed to adopt has risen from 38 per cent to 56 per cent in the past eight years. The report’s authors said the survey showed New Zealanders have become more open-minded in their attitudes to some key moral and social issues and are now more accepting of homosexuals than ever before. http://m.bayofplentytimes.co.nz/news/a-new-survey-shows-more-people-believe-homosexual-/1454396/Providing a good home takes priorityBay of Plenty Times July 16 2012 A generation ago the prospect of allowing a homosexual male couple to adopt a child would have been met with anger and derision. The Aids epidemic of the 1980s only made more life difficult for those brave enough to declare their sexuality to a wary public. How times have changed.In 1989 Denmark legally recognised same-sex unions and in 2001, the Netherlands became the first country to legalise same-sex marriage. New Zealand hasn’t quite got to the place where same-sex marriage is legal but it is being talked about. Along with Labour MP Louisa Wall, Green Party list MP Kevin Hague has submitted a private member’s bill to legalise same-sex marriage. Questioned on the issue, Prime Minister John Key says he would support a bill to legalise same-sex marriage at its initial stage, but would not guarantee his support would continue through to the final reading that would see it become law. But is adding adoption to the same-sex marriage debate going a step too far?http://m.bayofplentytimes.co.nz/news/editorial-good-home-same-sex-adoption/1454401/last_img read more

Police offices cited for ‘community relations’

first_imgThe Aklan Police Provincial Office bagged the same accolade in the provincial police office category. “Our regional director (Police Brigadier General Rene Pamuspusan) acknowledges the performance of every police office and the performance of our personnel,” said Police Colonel Gilbert Gorero, spokesperson of the Police Regional Office 6. Police Captain Peter John Pisuena of the Jamindan Municipal Police Station was feted as Outstanding Junior Police Commissioned Officer of the Year. On the other hand, Police Executive Master Sergeant Donna Asmod of the Capiz Police Provincial Office was recognized as Outstanding PCR Junior Police Non-Commissioned Officer of the Year while Rennie Baticos was the Outstanding Non-Uniformed Personnel. Various police offices conducted bloodletting, gift-giving and poster-making, among many other activities and programs to improve their relations with the communities they serve./PN ILOILO City – The Iloilo City Police Office (ICPO) was adjudged “City Police Office of the Year for Police Community Relations” (PCR) during the 25th PCR Month celebration held at the Madia-as Hall of Camp Delgado here. In the municipal police office category, the San Jose Municipal Police Station in Antique earned the citation. Several police officers were also given recognition. Police Lieutenant Eduardo Corpuz of the Victorias City Police Station was hailed as Outstanding PCR Senior Police Commissioned Officer of the Year.last_img read more

Johnny DeYoung Jr. wins at Crystal

first_imgCRYSTAL, Mich. (June 13) – Johnny DeYoung Jr. pulled off the win over A.J. Ward in Saturday’s All-Star Performance IMCA Modified feature at Crystal Motor Speedway.The win was dedicated in remembrance of John DeYoung Sr., the patriarch of the DeYoung racing family, who passed away last week.Chance Hoppes was second, followed by Joe Fowler.One hundred and forty-five cars were entered on CMS Internet Night at Crystal.last_img