College adds scholarship

first_imgSaint Mary’s students will have the opportunity to add to their financial aid package with a new scholarship funded by the Hearst Foundation. The Hearst Foundation, founded by William Randolph Hearst, has donated $60,000 to Saint Mary’s College to benefit students who are academically talented, but also economically disadvantaged. Students who are members of an underrepresented minority will have priority, according to a College press release. “We anticipate the average award per student to be $2,500 each year, which will be added on top of their current financial aid package,” director of financial aid Kathleen Brown said. The Class of 2014 is the first class of students to receive the Hearst scholarship for the 2012-13 academic year. “We anticipate that 12 students overall will receive this award,” Brown said Scholarships will be given the student’s junior year and renewed for senior year.  Students must be US citizens, eligible for the Federal Pell Grant Program and ideally majoring in science, math or engineering, according to Brown said. The process of determining this year’s Hearst Scholars is currently being finalized, she said. “The hope is that this scholarship will help students to graduate with less debt,” Brown said. Brown said this scholarship is part of an ongoing goal of providing more aid to eligible students. “Part of [President Carol Ann Mooney’s] last strategic plan was that we provide aid to 100 percent of Pell-eligible students,” Brown said. Emphasis for Hearst Scholar candidates is also put on students of an underrepresented minority, the press release stated. Minorities represented 13.5 percent of total students at Saint Mary’s during the 2011-12 school year, according to Saint Mary’s Institutional Research. Underrepresented minorities currently present at Saint Mary’s include African American, American Indian, Asian, Hispanic and Native Hawaiian. The Hearst Foundation has a strong tie to students with culturally diverse backgrounds.  Their mission is to identify and fund outstanding nonprofits to ensure that people of all backgrounds in the United States have the opportunity to build healthy, productive and inspiring lives, according to the Hearst Foundation. Making a Saint Mary’s education affordable to girls with different educational and ethnic backgrounds has also long been a mission of Saint Mary’s, according to the College website. Contact Caroline Rech at crech01@saintmarys.edulast_img read more

Saint Mary’s among top-ten economically diverse colleges

first_imgSaint Mary’s received the No. 8 ranking on New York Times’ list of Most Economically Diverse Top Colleges in the nation, published Tuesday.Sam Coughlin | The Observer According to the article, the colleges in the ranking have all made significant changes in recruiting policies and have made compromises elsewhere to ensure that a diverse student body is a top priority. Oftentimes, talented poor students who have traditionally excelled in high school, do not go onto top colleges, nor graduate from any college.Saint Mary’s College President Carol Mooney said it is the College’s goal to meet the financial needs of every student and ensure all students, regardless of socioeconomic background, have the chance to receive a Saint Mary’s education.“We do not want any student to be unable to attend Saint Mary’s because she lacks the financial means to do so.“As part of our Catholic mission to reach out to those with the greatest need, the College must find ways to allow these students to pursue a Saint Mary’s education,” Mooney said.President Mooney said the College is dedicated to educating all qualified students. In the College’s ongoing campaign, “Faith Always, Action Now,” the College has raised more than $23 million for such scholarships.Compared to the other colleges in the New York Times’ ranking, Saint Mary’s has a noticeably smaller endowment per student, at $80,000. As stated in the article, Vassar’s (no. 1) endowment per student is $340,000, Grinnell’s (no. 2) endowment per student is $880,000 and Harvard’s (no. 6) endowment per student is $1.52 million.Vice president for enrollment management Mona Bowe said the ranking accords with Saint Mary’s mission to enroll  qualified students who are ready to learn, work hard and make a difference in the world.“We first look for students with the academic background we feel will result in a successful academic performance at Saint Mary’s,” Bowe said. “But beyond the academics, we look for students who are well rounded: aware of the needs of others, strong in their faith, willing to go the extra mile, athletes, performers and artists.“A wide variety of backgrounds and interests makes for a rich community where learning happens outside of the classroom as much as it happens in the classroom.”Director of the office for institutional research Daniel Flowers said the article reflects the College’s ongoing efforts to provide education to students from all economic backgrounds, which began nearly 20 years ago.“[NY Times] calculated a ‘College Access Index’ that looks at the percentage of students receiving Pell and the net-price for low and middle-income families while taking into account our financial resources as measured by the endowment size,” Flowers said. “They found that out of the universe of top colleges with a four-year graduation rate above 75% (about 100 institutions) we were near the top of the list in terms of this access index.“We’ve also experienced one of the largest increases in students from economically disadvantaged backgrounds from 2007-08 to 2012-2014, from 14% to 24%,” Flowers said. “Only Vassar and American saw larger increases.”Bowe said the admissions team does not consider the ability for students to pay a requirement for admission.“After acceptance, the financial aid team works very hard to make Saint Mary’s a reality for as many students as possible,” Bowe said.As a member of the enrollment team for almost 20 years, Bowe said she is proud of the mission-driven, ethical approach to recruiting the next generation of Belles.“It is a team effort, from our colleagues that raise the funds for scholarships, to our professors and student life professionals, who tend to the needs of our students,” Bowe said. “And not only do we make it possible for students with less financial means to choose Saint Mary’s, we make it possible for them to stay and graduate on time.“We will continue to be good stewards of the resources that our amazing donors have made possible. We hope to continue to provide access to students who find Saint Mary’s to be a great fit for them.”Flowers said the ranking proves that Saint Mary’s is true to their mission of pioneering education.“In sum, we’re living our mission as there aren’t many other top-quality institutions out there doing more for low and middle-income students than Saint Mary’s College,” Flowers said.Senior Amanda Gilbert said she and many of her fellow Belles felt honored to discover the news of the ranking.“It’s just another great accomplishment for Saint Mary’s in our ongoing mission to be a well-rounded campus full of inspirational and confident women,” Gilbert said. “One of the things we students always say we love about Saint Mary’s is our sense of community.“This ranking came as no surprise to us, for we are constantly aware of our opportunities here to engage with a diverse student body and community.”Tags: Economic Diversitylast_img read more

Knights of Columbus fundraise with steak sandwich sales

first_imgThe white and blue banner that hangs from the double arches of the Knights of Columbus building at the intersection of South and God quads reads, “Home of Football Game Day Steak Sales $1,000,000 Since 1973.” Talk to any member of the Notre Dame Knights of Columbus, though, and they will tell you it’s about much more than the steak.Photo courtesy of Notre Dame Knights of Columbus “Notre Dame Knights are proud of their steak sale program, but more than the time spent on game days raising funds, the council enjoys working with some of the charities we support,” Robert Rauch, Notre Dame class of 2012 and former president of the Notre Dame Knights of Columbus, said.“For instance, we annually conduct several events with the Corvilla Home, one of our first charities,” Rauch, who now works as the College Council Coordinator for the Knights of Columbus Supreme Office, said. “We have annually prepared and consumed a Thanksgiving dinner with residents, we have participated in bingo and bowling events, and we have sponsored a team in their Snowball Softball tournament. The best part of steak sales is being able to have a relationship with the people we support.”According to the Notre Dame Knight of Columbus website, the steak sale began in 1973, but members of the Knights had been grilling steak sandwiches as part of their own tailgate since the late 1950s. Dennis Malloy, a third-year law student, said the location of the sale helped it take hold as a game day tradition.“The location of the Council Home next to the old bookstore was a prime location with thousands of potential consumers,” Malloy said. “We decided to sell only steak sandwiches to provide a distinct treat to our customers and reap the benefits of economies of scale.“Even though the bookstore moved and the glamour of Irish Green is far away, we are an essential part of the game day experience for many who make a special trip to the corner of God Quad and South Quad to visit us.”Malloy, who is a former grand knight of Notre Dame’s branch of the Knights of Columbus, Council 1477, said the Notre Dame Knights have about 100 active members. Each football Saturday, Malloy said at least 15 people work the steak sale at any given time, and about 40 people, including Knights, their friends and family and members of other campus organizations, work the sale throughout the day.Rauch said poor weather can lessen proceeds from the steak sale, but on a typical game day, the Knights will serve about 3,000 sandwiches and raise $10,000. As the sign outside the Knights of Columbus building highlights, the steak sales have raised over $1 million since 1973, a figure which Rauch said is not adjusted for inflation.Sophomore Henry Dickman, who oversees the steak sale this year, said he hopes to involve more student groups in the unique fundraiser.“Steak sales are not only significant in terms of the funds raised, but the event also provides a great way for council members to get to know each other and serve the Notre Dame community,” Dickman said. “Going forward, we’d like to find ways to get other campus groups involved with helping at the sales as well as attracting more students to buy sandwiches.”Rauch said the tradition of the Knights of Columbus at Notre Dame extends much further than the steak sales. The Notre Dame Knights were founded in 1910 and were the first student group on campus aside from athletic teams, the marching band and student government.“Like many things related to Notre Dame football, Knights of Columbus steak sales are rooted in tradition,” Rauch said. “The large stream of fans to the bookstore would smell the steak next door and would buy one on their way in or out. Plus, the steak sale program is all about charity and giving back — both themes that members of the Notre Dame family identify with.“When Fr. Sorin said that Notre Dame would one day be an enormous force for good in this country, he was speaking of people like the Notre Dame Knights who through their steak sale program and all their other activities serves as this force by being a charity that evangelizes.”Rauch said the sale can be taxing at times, but the benefits far outweigh the challenges.“College students typically don’t enjoy waking up before 8 a.m. on a Saturday morning, much less multiple Saturdays in a row, but that’s what the men of this council do every game day,” he said. “But when you have a good cause to support, you keep that in site and you keep going.”Jeff Gerlomes, Notre Dame class of 2014 and former president of the Notre Dame Knights of Columbus, said while the steak sale serves as a favorite game day tradition, it also goes beyond the bounds of Notre Dame football to make a tangible impact on peoples’ lives.“When we see that line down the quad, it’s humbling to think that this sandwich is as important to some of these people as a tartan cape or a golden helmet,” Gerlomes said. “Even more important, though, is that this fundraiser is our biggest opportunity to make a direct impact on some of the most serious social injustices around us. Instead of just campaigning for the poor and marginalized, we can aid programs that really help them on a lasting and personal level.”Tags: Game Day Tradition, Knights of Columbus, Steak Sandwich Salelast_img read more

EPA administrator speaks at ND

first_imgMargaret Hynds | The Observer Just days after Pope Francis’s arrival in the U.S. and address to the nation’s leaders, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administrator Gina McCarthy spoke on campus Friday afternoon to both students and the press, discussing climate change and Notre Dame’s recently announced efforts to reduce its carbon footprint and integrate a variety of sustainable energy sources.In the next five years, the University will cease burning coal in its campus power plant, and by 2030 it plans to halve its carbon emissions, University president Fr. John Jenkins said last week.At Friday’s press conference, McCarthy quoted Francis’s words earlier in the week and stressed the importance of the nation getting behind efforts to prevent further climate change.“On Wednesday, during remarks at the White House, the Holy Father Pope Francis said, ‘When it comes to the care of our common home, we are living at a critical moment in history,’” she said. “Indeed the Pope, President Obama and countless other world leaders have made it clear that the time to action climate change is now, and that all of us — whether in the public, private, academic or faith-based communities — have a role to play in addressing this global challenge for the sake of our kids and especially for those most vulnerable. That’s why we must act today.“And I have to say, the pope’s time in Washington was indeed personal for me, not just as a Catholic but as someone who has been in the fight against climate change for many years.“His trip reaffirmed the tide really has turned … that we’re past the old days of debating the science and making incremental progress, and right now we do have solutions available to us so that we can take actions now that are not just good at addressing climate but that are also good for our economy and those most vulnerable,” she said.McCarthy described Notre Dame’s plans for the integration of sustainable energy and reduction of carbon emissions as “an opportunity to demonstrate what the pope’s moral responsibility actually looks like.”“The steps we are taking here today at ND are something that I want to make sure everybody knows and is celebrating, because they are a tremendous example of bringing life to the pope’s challenge; of recognizing that we have a moral responsibility and we do have actions that we can and must take today,” she said. “I want to explain to everybody just how excited I am to be on this campus, under this president’s leadership and actually tackling this issue in a way that’s going to add value to the campus, but perhaps more importantly bring life to the intersect of faith and values that the challenge of climate change demands.“That is really so well aligned with the message of this pope. And I commend the University of ND for setting ambitious goals and efforts in taking action already to reduce their carbon footprint, which they expect to halve by 2030. That is what leadership and that is what stewardship actually looks like,” she said.Executive Vice President John Affleck-Graves also spoke, detailing further what the University hopes and plans to do in the coming years in regards to renewable energy.As the University works through its coal cessation plan, he said, it has explored and is currently working on a number of other energy strategies.“At the moment, we’re using a lot of natural gas, we’re looking at creating our first geothermal field set to go in after next June as we complete the research building on the east side of campus,” he said. “We’re going to have a geothermal field under the parking area there, and we’re looking at other geothermal fields in several places on campus.”In addition to geothermal energy, Affleck-Graves said Notre Dame is investigating other avenues to create a more “diversified strategy.”“[We’re] moving more and more towards renewable energy, so we arrive at a situation where most of our energy will come from renewable sources,” he said. “ … We’re looking at a hydroelectric plant on the river. We’re working with the city of South Bend, and that’s in the planning and approval stages. There’s a lot of regulation that goes around that.“We’re also looking at solar, particularly in some of the parking fields that we have, where we have large open areas that we can maybe put solar on top of parking structures, and maybe a little bit of solar on top of roofs.”When asked about the cost of moving from traditional sources of energy to renewable sources, Affleck-Graves said he did not foresee that being a large issue for the University. The cost of investing in things like a geothermal field would be high, he said, but after the field goes in there would no longer be installation costs associated with it.“I wouldn’t say it’s new money, it’s an element of new money but also the redirection of money. … Instead of a new coal fire burner, we’ll invest in another alternative source,” he said.McCarthy said because climate change is a reality now, action needs to be taken immediately to protect the disadvantaged and future generations.“It’s not just about the challenge of keeping our children safe in the future, but it is all about protecting them today, protecting the most vulnerable and making sure we meet the president’s call for us to take action and meet that moral responsibility,” she said.Tags: EPA, Notre Dame, Pope Francis, renewable energylast_img read more

Stanford Hall recognized as 2016-2017 Hall of the Year

first_imgPhoto courtesy of Janet Stengle Members of the three winning halls, Stanford, Farley and Carroll, pose with plaques honoring their dorms’ achievements. The Hall of the Year winners were announced in an event held at Legends.HPC co-chair Christina Fernandez said the halls were selected through an extensive evaluation process.“The halls throughout the year submit seven Rockne reports, which adds up to one a month, in which they detail events they have, who attended [and] what the purpose of the event was,” she said. “All [the halls’] presentations detail the work that they’ve done this year — what were their goals, did they achieve them how did they do so, how did they impact residents personal growth.”Fernandez said each dorm’s unique approach to residence life was crucial in selecting victors.“Each hall caters to its residents’ needs differently and that’s something very valuable for us,” she said.Andrew Foster, president of Hall of the Year recipient Stanford Hall, said the dorm made strides in growing an already strong community this year. “It was really just everyone getting out, everyone really forming that good group of people in Stanford Hall — people who are proud to be there,” he said.Stanford Hall vice president, Matt Geenen said a new mantra help to motivate the dorm to be its best.“We had the mantra of ‘record year’ and everyone just really got behind that and it went towards everything we did,” he said. “…  I think it was the whole mentality of the dorm, everyone just really rallied behind it.”This spirit, Geenen said, was shown in events put on by the dorm throughout the year.“I think our new signature event, the Irish Iron Classic, went super well,” he said. “We raised over $1,000 for the center for the homeless. Just having guys from across campus come and lift weights, something they don’t get to do or compete in often I think it was a really great event we did this year.” A similar sense of community helped motivate Carroll Hall, the Men’s Hall of the year, to stage new events and make its community tighter. This growing bond was easy to forge despite changes in the hall, Carroll vice president John McCormack said.“The fact that we had a new rector, two new [assistant rectors], a new cleaning lady … that was just by the wayside,” he said. “[The hall] was [about how] we’re a family, we’re a community and we’re going to take this place to heights it’s never been.” Carroll Hall president Andrew Rebholz said new events were key in helping with the changes.“It’s a lot about making sure the events that we have — we have a lot of events, maybe three a week — are good opportunities to bond,” he said. “[We want to make sure] people come to those and make those the best activities that they could be.”Rebholz said these events were more constructive than in years past.“I would say that if anything changed it was having events based not just on having fun but having discussion events,” he said. “We added a lot of dialogue in Carroll this year which was awesome to see because people could bond on a more spiritual and mental level which is pretty nice to have.”Carly Gray, vice president of Women’s Hall of the Year recipient Farley Hall, said successful execution of the dorm’s signature event was key to Farley’s success.“I think we really pulled off an incredible Be Fine Day,” Gray said. “We were really proud of how much progress we made in terms of that signature event.”A shared sense of community was also cited by Gray as a source of pride for the hall this year.“We work[ed] with hall staff to really create a bond between Farley sisters,” she said. “It’s  … people having strong relationships within the hall and caring about the hall so they come to events and participate in the community. You felt a really great presence on campus this year.”Tags: Carroll Hall, Farley Hall, Hall of the year, HPC, Stanford Hall Notre Dame’s Student Leadership Awards Banquet took place Monday evening at Legends where Hall Presidents Council (HPC) announced Stanford Hall as its Hall of the Year. Men’s Hall of the Year and Women’s Hall of the Year were also announced with Carroll Hall and Farley Hall taking home the awards respectively.last_img read more

Student trainers play key role in keeping football team healthy

first_imgAlthough they spend most of their time in the training room or on the sidelines, Notre Dame’s student trainers perform a valuable service for the football team. Working closely with the head trainers of the Sports Medicine staff, student trainers are responsible for everything from providing the players with water to assisting trainers with medical treatments. Photo courtesy of Rose Hart The football student trainers work with the head trainers and play an integral role in helping the team stay healthy.Junior Rose Hart said she wanted to be a student trainer before she was even at Notre Dame. Her brother, a former Notre Dame student, told her about the program and encouraged her to do it, she said.“I had been telling my friends since junior year of high school, ‘I’m going to be an athletic trainer at Notre Dame,’” Hart said.Student trainers’ primary responsibility is working closely with head trainers to ensure the players are healthy and hydrated on and off the field, Hart said.“We do pre- and post-practice treatments,” she said. “We’ll assist the head trainers in whatever they need us to do. It’s a lot of taping ankles, wrists, fingers.”Junior Claire Boyce works alongside Hart and said the student trainers enjoy their responsibility.“We work in the training room helping with rehab treatments and other responsibilities,” Boyce said in an email. “We also work with the football team and take pride in being ‘hydration specialists’ at practices and games.”Although games can be hectic on the field, Hart said the trainers always have a good time on football Saturdays.“Sometimes it’s a little bit of running around, making sure everything’s good,” Hart said. “Everyone’s so nice and helpful. It’s not really that stressful. It’s mostly just fun.”Not only do student trainers put in up to 20 hours of work during football season, but they sacrifice typical game day experiences, such as tailgating and cheering alongside their classmates in the student section.“Initially I thought I’d miss tailgating, but once I started working the games, I realized being on the sidelines was just as fun,” Boyce said. “Working alongside the team every day, I’m very invested in ND football, so I love getting to watch the games from the field.”Hart said she was worried about missing out during her freshman year but has come to love working on game days. This year, she worked the first two home games but had the third game against Miami (OH) off. She said she spent the day tailgating with her friends and family but missed being part of the training team.“I found myself missing being inside game day — getting to be on the field before the game, and setting up, and seeing all the pre-game things,” she said. “It’s a very different experience. I definitely don’t regret it, but sometimes my friends miss me.”Both Hart and Boyce have been student trainers since their freshman year, when they applied, interviewed and shadowed upperclassmen for a year before being selected to continue for the next three years. Hart said the student trainers have a great community with each other and the teams with which they work.“There’s about 20 of us and we’re really close, so it’s really fun,” Hart said.The student trainers even have some traditions of their own, including watching the team walk to Notre Dame Stadium before every game, Hart said.“One of my favorite things to do is after we have everything set up and we hear the band start to play, Claire and I will run up to the top of the Stadium,” Hart said. “I stand at the top and look over and can see the Main Building, the Basilica, the library and everything. I get to see the team walk in and all the fans get really excited. It’s an awesome view.”Tags: football, Football Friday Feature, Sports Medicine, Student trainerslast_img read more

Student government hosts South Bend Scavenger Hunt

first_imgFor students who are looking for a study break or a change of pace, Notre Dame’s student government is hosting a scavenger hunt of the South Bend area. Students who visit the five sites on the Fall 2019 scavenger hunt list — and submit photo evidence — will be entered into a raffle for a prize.Junior Jessica Reeg and sophomore Erica Maggelet organized the scavenger hunt to promote the South Bend Adventure Guide, which the department of student engagement and outreach launched in August. The guide provides a list of sites and events students can explore in the South Bend area. The department hopes the scavenger hunt will help publicize the guide, as students share their experiences on social media.“As the department of community engagement and outreach, one of the biggest things we wanted to do is try to get more and more kids involved in the South Bend community — not just as a place to volunteer — but actually be a part of the community and go out, eat at local restaurants and shop and visit parks,” the department’s director, Alex Yom, said.Yom said he hopes the South Bend Adventure Guide can help bridge the divide between the Notre Dame and South Bend communities, encouraging students to step off campus and experience the city’s culture.“We saw there’s kind of a gap in between the availability of things to do in South Bend and not many people knowing about how to get there or what to do,” Yom said. “So we wanted to kind of fill that gap by developing a guide where people could turn to see, ‘If I’m looking to go off campus, this is somewhere I could go.’”Yom said the South Bend Adventure Guide offers “all kinds of different activities for students to do if they’re looking for a break from the everyday routine on campus.” He noted that students can now visit South Bend’s Howard Park, which had its grand reopening on Nov. 29. As a fun way to explore the city, Reeg encouraged students to check out “First Fridays” in downtown South Bend. Every first Friday of the month, she said, downtown South Bend has a themed showcase of events, restaurant deals and a different monthly theme. Although this semester’s scavenger hunt ends on Dec. 13, Reeg said the department is planning a spring scavenger hunt for next semester. She said she hopes students will take the opportunity to explore the community.“A lot of other schools have big college towns, especially state schools,” Reeg said. “And I think that there’s a tendency for Notre Dame students to stay within their little safe bubble, not really leave campus much because, in theory, you could really stay here — we have restaurants, we have things to do. And a lot of dorm culture stays on campus so [students] don’t even really go out socially too.”Sophomore Emma Kerr said she thinks many students have stigmas and preconceived notions about the city of South Bend.“I wasn’t sure about the South Bend area coming to Notre Dame, especially as a lot of my friends were going to big and bustling cities,” Kerr said. She said she would be interested in the scavenger hunt and hopes other students will take the time to engage with the South Bend community in meaningful ways.“There’s a lot going on in the city,” Kerr said. “And I think that sometimes kids just don’t take that initial step into the community.”Yom said the department of community engagement and outreach wants to foster a culture of engagement between students and the South Bend area. Currently, he said the department is developing a partnership with the Moreau First-Year Experience program, and they plan to put the South Bend Adventure Guide on next year’s Welcome Weekend app. “We’re trying to build a culture of getting off campus and enjoying the South Bend community from your first year on,” Yom said.Before the semester comes to an end, Reeg encouraged all students to visit the scavenger hunt locations and DM their photos to @sbadventure_guide on Instagram. ”[If you win the raffle], you get a gift card to Rocco’s Pizza — which is also another place on the guide,” Reeg said.Tags: Department of Community Engagement, Downtown South Bend, South Bend Adventure Guidelast_img read more

Pro-Trump Road Cruise Takes Over Fairmount Avenue, County Roads

first_imgImage by Andrew Stevenson / WNY News Now.WEST ELLICOTT — Hundreds of President Donald Trump supporters took part in a road cruise on Saturday afternoon.Image by Andrew Stevenson / WNY News Now.Starting at the former K-Mart parking lot at noon, the parade continued west on Route 394 and back toward Jamestown on Route 430.Organizers encouraged people to participate in their trucks, cars, motorcycles, classic cars or “anything street legal.”Image by Andrew Stevenson / WNY News Now.Participants decorated their vehicles with pro Trump signs, flags and bumper stickers. “Support our president and support our essential workers from the Police, fire and volunteer departments along with everyone who has supported our country in a positive way,” organizers said.Image by Andrew Stevenson / WNY News Now.Previously, two recent pro Trump boat rallies were held on Chautauqua Lake drawing more than 100 watercraft and sky divers. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window),100’s of vehicles in the Parade to honor our President & Police Force1000’s of people were lining the roads throughout the journey of the parade, ALL in support, beeping their horns passing by, waving American Flags & Trump Flags, thumbs up, Smiling & waving from their homes….. Proud to be American !!!!Less than 20 AntiTrumpers…….Winning !!!!!,I’m proud to be an American and will continue to support our president! God bless you President Trump!,Losers and Suckers….,Isn’t it funny how the anti-Trump people are always so negative, even NASTY at their fellow Americans for not FULLY agreeing with them.Shame…….,Loved every minute of the drive, we laughed at all the vulgar mouths, waved and honked horns with all the Trump supporters. And the support for our President Trump was way over the naysayers. I loved every bit of it.last_img read more

Local Governments Could Face $10,000 Fine For Not Enforcing COVID-19 Orders

first_imgImage by Kevin P. Coughlin / Office of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) ALBANY — Under a new directive issued by Gov. Andrew Cuomo, local governments could face a $10,000 per day fine for not strongly enforcing his executive orders or Department of Health emergency regulations.Cuomo issued a statement late Friday requiring all local governments in COVID-19 “hot spots” to establish a framework for reporting their enforcement activities and setting specific consequences for failure to enforce the State Department of Health Emergency Regulations and the Governor’s Executive Orders related to social distancing, mask compliance, and capacity limitations.If local governments do not enforce these legally binding requirements, they will be in violation of the order and can be subject to fines, Cuomo warned.center_img “The Commissioner of Health will issue a Section 16 order to the local governments advising them that they have to step up the compliance, that it is the law and if the local governments don’t step up the compliance, they will actually be in violation of the law and they can be fined. I have asked the local governments many times to actually do the compliance,” Cuomo said. “Compliance is not public education—it is enforcement. People know what the rules are and they’ve heard them every day. Local governments have to do enforcement. Whether or not it fits with their political agenda really is pointless. It’s the law and their job is to enforce the law.”Failure to adhere to the order can result in penalties of up to $10,000 per day, pursuant to Section 12-b of the state Public Health Law.last_img read more

Exclusive! Hear A Chorus Line Composer Marvin Hamlisch’s First Performance of ‘At the Ballet’

first_imgIf you missed Marvin Hamlisch: What He Did for Love on PBS, you can catch up with this fascinating new documentary via iTunes (available now) and on DVD and digital download directly from the filmmakers (www.marvinhamlischmovie.com) on January 14. The DVD will include a 17-minute-long extra feature “Marvin Hamlisch and Ed Kleban: A Beautiful Collaboration,” and Broadway.com has an exclusive audio clip of the Chorus Line composer and lyricist performing their achingly beautiful ballad “At the Ballet” for director Michael Bennett at the show’s first workshop. Click below to savor the moment, click here to read documentary director Dori Berinstein’s reflections Hamlisch, and don’t miss What He Did for Love. View Commentslast_img read more