Letters to the Editor for Monday, Sept. 9

first_imgMore from The Daily Gazette:Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motorists Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionAmericans should be more compassionateIt is inconceivable to me that our president put so much emphasis on appointing Supreme Court justices who would embark on overturning Roe Vs. Wade because he was so outraged with ending the life of a fetus.Yet he so callously ignored and dismissed the importance of ending a medical program for those from other countries needing to be in the United States for life-saving medical interventions.Within the month, this administration will end this program resulting in medical consequences for many of those people here in the United States for medical support.One might argue that because they are undocumented immigrants, they have no right to receive this help.Others might think that America is a country of compassion that will provide others with the support they need under dire circumstances.These people pose no threat to us.The threat to America is the deserved condemnation against this administration by anyone or any country that has a conscience about how a person is treated when such a program is terminated.Bill ShapiroSchenectady World not yet giving up on its use of coalWhile Americans are noble in their attempt to outgrow coal, the world consumption is increasing.A billionaire coal magnate died recently after just seeing the last obstacle of developing the most recent major coal find in Australia.In the past year, India burned over 600 million metric tons of coal. They welcome cheap Australian coal.In India, 70% of electrical generation is coal-fired electrical generation.India has announced its intended mandate is to bring electricity to 300 million Indians who don’t have electricity. Their fuel of choice is coal because it’s cheap. India has abundant coal reserves, and the direct negative impacts on climate are ignored.India is going to sell coal-generated electricity to Bangladesh.What is ironic is that Bangladesh will be one of the greatest death sources during major weather events.Millions of acres of Bangladesh are only a few feet above sea level.They will suffer hundreds of thousands of casualties from storm surge, malaria and cholera during the next typhoon.Richard MoodyMiddleburghlast_img read more

Docklands building peaks

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Come clean on avoidance

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Q + A

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Lawyers shuffle City deck

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Pelham in $220m Polish push

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Studley toasts LSH agreement

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In the blast zone

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Sweet dreams

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Climate change cause of Greater Jakarta floods, BMKG says

first_imgTopics : Dwikorita said the BMKG recorded higher average temperatures in most Indonesian provinces last year compared to the average temperatures recorded in the same regions between 1981 and 2010.The highest was recorded in Banten and Riau Islands between January and October 2019, with each province seeing an average temperature increase that was more than 1 degree Celsius higher than the temperatures recorded in the provinces between 1981 and 2010, according to BMKG data. In Jakarta, the average temperature last year was 0.82 degrees Celsius higher than the average temperature between 1981 and 2010.BMKG head of climate and air quality information Siswanto said that, between 1866 and 2010, the annual temperature rise in Jakarta was 1.4 times higher compared to the global trend. Climate change-driven global warming is a factor behind repeated instances of severe flooding across Greater Jakarta since early January, including a flood that inundated parts of the capital on Tuesday, according to the Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics Agency (BMKG).BMKG head Dwikorita Karnawati said the string of floods that hit Jakarta and its satellite cities over the past two months was a result of several changes.“In addition to the increase of rainfall intensity and the continuation of extreme conditions, it turns out that the temperature of Indonesia has also significantly increased,” Dwikorita said.center_img He said the global annual temperature had increased at an average rate of 0.86 degrees Celsius from 1866 to 2010, while in the same period, “Jakarta’s land temperature increased at an average rate of 1.6 degree Celsius”.Read also: Rising sea levels threaten 23 million in Indonesia’s coastal cities by 2050: StudyDwikorita said Indonesia needed be cautious and keep watch of the rising temperature “because this is an indicator of global climate change that has a local impact”.“From the results of the BMKG analysis, there is a significant correlation between [the temperature rise] and the concentration of greenhouse gases in Indonesia’s regions,” she said.The BMKG head said the rising greenhouse gas emissions were caused by high concentrations of carbon dioxide, with transportation, industry and deforestation among the main drivers of the change.“Extreme weather and climate phenomena are happening more frequently with greater intensity. Such occurrences are predicted to also happen in the future, from 2020 to 2040, if we fail to carry out mitigation measures,” she said.Greater Jakarta was hit by floods on Tuesday morning following overnight torrential rainfall in the fourth major flood to hit Jakarta and its satellite cities since the beginning of the year. The BMKG found that, from 7:00 a.m. on Monday until 7:00 a.m. on Tuesday, rainfall intensity reached 278 millimeters per day, enough to be categorized as extreme rain given it exceeded 150 mm per day, Dwikorita said. At least 19,901 residents across 214 subdistricts in Greater Jakarta were displaced following the floods, according to the National Disaster Mitigation Agency.Jakarta’s highest daily rainfall since 2007 came on Dec. 31, 2019 at 377 mm per day. The heavy New Year’s Eve downpour caused major floods across Greater Jakarta, Banten and parts of West Java and claimed 60 lives and displaced hundreds of thousands of people for days.last_img read more